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MAY
            May 18 - May 22  Fukuhara Workshop

JUNE

            June 3 - Concert in the Rocks 

 

July

August

September

October

    October 7 - 9 Lone Pine Film Festival
           Celebrating Western Directors

November

December

SAVE THE DATE

SATURDAY JUNE 13, 2015
newsflash 2 
Concert Now a Weekend Event!
Click Here 
 
Lone Ranger Canyon Will ROCK..........

                  with one of Country's BEST Bands

DINNER
SOLD OUT
Limited # of 
CONCERT ONLY TICKETS AVAILABLE 

CALL MUSEUM

760-876-9103 


An Amazing Tribute to the pioneers of the 
                                      OUTLAW COUNTRY movement.

JOHNNY CASH,  WILLIE NELSON 

WAYLON JENNINGS,  KRIS KRISTOFFERSON

 

Tony Suraci The HIGHWAYMAN & his Posse of Nine 

Ride  into Lone Ranger Canyon for one of

Lone Pine's

GREATEST 

Concert In the Rocks
Concert Rocks 2015 landscape no text 72 Dpi
Photo of Tony - courtesty of Terri  Rippee

 Tickets on Sale NOW!



Lone Ranger Canyon
 

CONCERT IN THE ROCKS

Saturday  June 13th, 2015


Rex_on_Stage_06_02_2013_RWS_200 Piano_2 Dinner_2__200JG    
Rex_on_Stage_3__06_02_2013_RWS200 Piano_1 Stage_PP_200      

Collage_72_dpi_600_x

Every June, the magnificent Lone Ranger Canyon, located in the Alabama Hills, is transformed into an “under the stars” venue for hosting the annual Lone Pine – “Concert in the Rocks”. The evening begins with a welcoming reception in the museum for annual members. Following the reception, members and other attendees are transported to the Alabama Hills for a "Cowboy Ranch" dinner preceding the show. 


When the entertainment starts, the evening sky is displaying early stars and the setting sun’s shadows are long on the canyon floor as the discreetly hidden lights create unique and mysterious shadows on the canyon walls. Master of Ceremonies  for the evening - Larry Maurice
 

SCHEDULE:
boot_ImageCocktail Reception for Lone Pine Film History Museum Members 4:30 PM

boot_ImageShuttle bus starts at 5.00 PM from the museum. (members and other attendees)

boot_ImageSit down dinner begins at 6:00 PM (Vegetarian Option Available)

boot_ImagePay bar (wine, beer, spirits)

boot_ImageWater and soft drinks provided

boot_ImageConcert commences at dusk

boot_ImageRetu shuttle around 9:30 PM after the concert ends


CONCERT AND DINNER IN THE ALABAMA HILLS

PLEASE NOTE

Transportation to the Canyon IS ONLY by bus service.
Buses will leave the Museum for Lone Ranger Canyon at 5:15 PM.
The entry to Lone Ranger Canyon will be roped off providing entry ONLY to buses.

DINNER IS SOLD OUT
         Limited # of CONCERT ONLY Tickets are available      
$60.00 per person 
BUSES LEAVE MUSEUM for Canyon @ 7:30
There is No Personal Car Parking access at Canyon 

Please Bring Chairs or Blanket

 

CALL MUSEUM FOR TICKETSl 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Please note: Concert Ticket purchases are FINAL. There are NO refunds


Staying the Night
 
Check out our Visitor Guide links for Local Motels
Best_Weste  Comfort_Inn  Dow_Villa
 Boulder_Creek_Rv

 

(CNN)Legendary actress Maureen O'Hara, best known for her roles in "Miracle on 34th Street" and films by John Ford, died Saturday of natural causes, her family said.  O'Hara, 95, passed away in her sleep at home in Boise, Idaho.

“BISHOP CALLS TO HOLLYWOOD AGAIN AND AGAIN” OPENS AT THE MUSEUM OF WESTERN FILM HISTORY FRIDAY JULY 24

Bishop Promo 600xJpegAn exhibit exploring the history of filming in Bishop and surrounding areas opens this Friday night, July 24, at the Museum of Western Film History in Lone Pine from 6 to 8pm. 

Starting in the 1920's theEastern Sierra provided a unique cinematic canvas for Hollywood’s prominent directors. The Sierra's dramatic landscapes provided a complement to the drama, adventure and epicness of their films that were graced by legendary silver screen stars. Langley's article provides a comprehensive overview of the great films shot in the region.

June 25, 2015: The Lone Pine Film Festival is upon us again, when we celebrate the rich film history of our areas: Lone Pine, Death Valley and the Eastern Sierra areas. This will be the twenty-sixth time we have rolled out the welcome mat to celebrities, fans and the curious who just happen by. Some highlights include a rare silent film screening of the first film shot in Lone Pine, The Round-Up, 91920); location tours, panels and full weekend if screenings. This year we celebrate - Silents & The Early Years.

Below you will find a selection of Films, Trailers and Commercials that represent a cross section of Lone Pine's landscape and Western Heritage of the Silver Screen. These include the Trailer for "Showdown in Lone Pine." Trailers for Westerns Made in Lone Pine A selection of TV Western Trailers Early Silent Films Lone Pine Commercials 

Lone Pine Film History Museum

Thursday February 26, 2015 @ 7:00 PM
 

Native Son – Horace Albright – An evening discussion presented by Inyo County, Inyo County Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Terry McAteer, will highlight the incredible career of one of Inyo County's most celebrated men. Horace Albright who helped to found The National Park Service in 1916.

4th Annual 
Alabama Hills Day 

Saturday, April 11th
Alabama_Hills_Day_brand_2015

Alabama_Hills_Day_Poster_2015Come celebrate the 4th Annual “Alabama Hills Day” on Saturday, April 11th from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm in Lone Pine, CA. The purpose of the event is to celebrate this scenic landscape and educate the public about the wide variety of groups/activities that access & interact with the Alabama’s.

 Join the "Rumble " in Lone Ranger Canyon

StarStarStarFull-out, "shimmy, shaking, swingin', rockin', boogie-woogie goodness!"StarStarStar

DINNER TICKETS are SOLD OUT
"CONCERT ONLY" Tickets are Available
See Bottom of This Page

 

COME FOR THE WEEKEND
Rock Roll 3
Friday June 3

Sandy & The High Country

Saturday June 4
Rumble Kings

SPECIAL TOURS

Saturday June 4
Audie Murphy Movie Site Tour

Sunday June 5
Alabama Hills Movie Site Tour

Click This Window for Details

  Concert Rocks POSTER 2016 72 dpi

RadioMicrophone


Radio Spot
KIBS

             

RadioMicrophone

Radio Spot
SIERRA WAVE

 “New Orleans Rock n Roll for the soul”

 

Rumble King is “Red-hot, Wild & Wailin.” They’re a five piece, Rockin’ Rhythm & Blues band that will get you
out of your seats and dancing on the tables. By combining roots Rhythm & Blues, Jazz, Rock & Roll, Rock-a-Billy,
and exotic musical flavors from around the world, this uniquely talented and tight quintet has stumbled across
an original style. Rumble King is led by Aaron Deily, a powerful juke joint style lead vocalist and his explosive
piano, Scott Ramirez and Obie Hughes are “howlin” on saxophones and back-up vocals, with Ulysses Gallegos
on upright bass. The band's renowned, powerhouse drummer is Bill Bateman.

__________________
Just Released
Rumble King Music Video - "I Still Adore You"
and Interviews with the Band

 Tickets on Sale NOW!

CONCERT IN THE ROCKS

Saturday  June 4th, 2016

Rex_on_Stage_06_02_2013_RWS_200 Piano_2 Dinner_2__200JG    
Rex_on_Stage_3__06_02_2013_RWS200 Piano_1 Stage_PP_200      


Collage_72_dpi_600_x

Every June, the magnificent Lone Ranger Canyon, located in the Alabama Hills, is transformed into an “under the stars” venue for hosting the annual Lone Pine – “Concert in the Rocks”. The evening begins with a welcoming reception in the museum for annual members. Following the reception, members and other attendees are transported to the Alabama Hills for a "Cowboy Ranch" dinner preceding the show. 


When the entertainment starts, the evening sky is displaying early stars and the setting sun’s shadows are long on the canyon floor as the discreetly hidden lights create unique and mysterious shadows on the canyon walls. Master of Ceremonies  for the evening - Larry Maurice
 

SCHEDULE:
boot_ImageCocktail Reception for Museum of Western Film History Members 4:30 PM

boot_ImageShuttle bus starts at 5.00 PM from the museum. (members and other attendees)

boot_ImageSit down dinner begins at 6:00 PM (Vegetarian Option Available)

SPONSORS
Alabama Hills Cafe
BLM Logo
Bonanza
 
Boulder_Creek_Rv
Coca Cola
Comfort_Inn
Coso Logo 4 x
Dow Villa
 
Josephs
Lees Frontier
Merry Go Round
 McDonalds
Mt. Whitney Restaurant
Pizza Factory
 
Sierra Storage
 Totem Cafe 1
 
 

boot_ImagePay bar (wine, beer, spirits)

boot_ImageWater and soft drinks provided

boot_ImageConcert commences at dusk


 
boot_ImageReturn shuttle around 9:30 PM after the concert ends

CONCERT AND DINNER IN THE ALABAMA HILLS

PLEASE NOTE

Transportation to the Canyon IS ONLY by bus service.
Buses will leave the Museum for Lone Ranger Canyon at 5:15 PM.

The entry to Lone Ranger Canyon will be roped off providing entry ONLY to buses.


DINNER IS SOLD OUT
         Limited # of CONCERT ONLY Tickets are available      
$60.00 per person 
BUSES LEAVE MUSEUM for Canyon @ 7:30
There is No Personal Car Parking access at Canyon 

Please Bring Chairs or Blanket

______________________________________________________

 CALL MUSEUM FOR TICKETS

760-876-9103

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Please note: Concert Ticket purchases are FINAL. There are NO refunds


Staying the Night
 
Check out our Visitor Guide links for Local Motels
Best_WesternComfort_Inn Dow_Villa Boulder_Creek_Rv

History of Lone Ranger Canyon

While details differ, the basic story of the origin of the Lone Ranger is the same in most versions of the franchise. Six Texas Rangers are drawn into a remote canyon and ambushed by a band of outlaws led by Bartholomew "Butch" Cavendish. All are left for dead.

Later, a young Indian named Tonto stumbles on the scene and recognizes the lone survivor, Ranger Reid (whose first name was never given), as the man who had saved his life at some time in the past. He nurses Reid back to health after digging six graves for Reid's comrades, so that Cavendish will think there were no survivors, forgetting that Cavendish thought he had killed seven men in that canyon, including the traitorous scout who led the Rangers into the trap. Among them is Reid's brother, Captain Daniel Reid, who is a Captain of the Texas Rangers. Tonto fashions a black Domino mask using material from Captain Reid's vest to conceal the Lone Ranger's identity. Even after the Cavendish gang is brought to justice, Reid continues to fight for law and order against evil and crime under the guise of the Lone Ranger.

Yes, Kimosabes, that ambush happened in The Alabama Hills near Lone Pine, California, in what is now called Lone Ranger Canyon. Each year, the Lone Pine community and Lone Pine Film History Museum pay tribute to the heritage of the canyon’s history by transforming the dramatic canyon into a magical entertainment venue under the Eastern Sierra stars.

 

 Rumble King Banner

Rumble king 2

 

Our Mission

The mission of the Lone Pine Film History Museum is to collect, preserve, protect, archive and exhibit a variety of original materials containing information of permanent historical value relating to the history and heritage of the American Western Film for the education and enrichment of the public. The Museum actively pursues collections of personal papers, business and organizational records, as well as memorabilia that reflect and document aspects of Western film history and popular culture for successive generations to discover. The emphasis of the Museum is to organize and preserve in perpetuity the collection and to create an educational archive accessible to the public for research and interpretation of American Western film heritage.

Lone Pine Film History Museum

Wednesday February 11, 2015 @ 7:00 PM
 

What Would John Muir Say?

An Evening Discussion with William Tweed on John Muir and our National Park System in the High Sierra with introductory comments by Dr. Terry McAteer, Inyo County Superintendent of Schools.

img1 72x72 wfCoachWells Fargo Mail Coach

Explore the museums information, right here with sound video, pictures and more. Click to Expand the links below to see more. 

img1 72x72 sideKickSidekicks

Explore the museums information, right here with sound video, pictures and more. Click to Expand the links below to see more. 

img1 72x72 chuckChuckwagon from "The Cowboys"

Explore the museums information, right here with sound video, pictures and more. Click to Expand the links below to see more. 

img1 72x72 hoppyHopalong Cassidy

Explore the museums information, right here with sound video, pictures and more. Click to Expand the links below to see more. 

 101 Ranch Wild West Show...
 Movie Stars And Geronimo Too

alt="101 ranch wild west show"

101 Ranch Company Store And Office

The 101 Ranch was a sprawling 110,000 acres of leased Indian lands that spread across four counties. It was founded in 1879 by Col. George W. Miller, a Confederate veteran. The 101 was a working showplace, self sufficient and employed thousands of people.

The ranch consisted of a school, show grounds, general store and cafe, hotel, newspaper, magazine, blacksmith shop, leather shop, dairy, saddle shop, meat packing plant, oil refinery and even its own scrip (money). Homes for employees were available on the ranch along with guest houses and a “Dude Ranch”. It was a city within itself consisting of a population of around 3,000 people at any given time.

alt-"101 Ranch Wild West Show"

101 Ranch White House

The 101 Ranch became one of the largest diversified farms with cross breeding of animals and agricultural products.

In 1903, Col. George Miller died and the ranch was taken over by his three sons. Each of his sons had a specialty that made the ranch pay off. The oldest was Joe Miller, an expert in grains and plants. The middle son, Zack was a cowman. The third son, George was a financial wizard.

In 1905, Joe started the 101 Ranch Wild West Show, an expansion of the yearly rodeos that featured roping, riding, bulldogging, Indian dancers, trick roping, riding and shooting. The show traveled all over the world. The Millers also introduced a sport called the “terrapin derbies”.

There were close to 80,000 people on the ranch opening day with the first Wild West Show. And no wonder what with such attractions as the Apache prisoner Geronimo, Buffalo Bill, Tom Mix, Bill Pickett and Lucille Mulhall, plus a buffalo hunt and barbecue, Indian sports and dancing, riding and roping contests, bands and a gigantic parade.

Geronimo, as a part of his act, was to shoot a buffalo with his bow and arrow after three tries the cowboys came in to finish the job. Henley notes that this meat was later barbecued, mixed with previously prepared beef and sold in 50 cent sandwiches, which was also quite a price for 1905.alt=101 Ranch Wild West Show""

Earl Henley of Tonkawa – remembers  Oklahoma’s “Gala Day” celebration at the once famed 101 Ranch in which he performed with his trained horse. He gives great details about what it what like at the 101 Ranch Wild West Shows.

A genuine buffalo hunt in the huge arena was also a big drawing card that day, the former cowboy recalls, for large buffalo herds were nearly extinct and this representation was one of the last in the country.

Gala Day marked the debut of Tom Mix as a western performer and featured Buffalo Bill driving a team of buffalo.

The gay and gaudy rodeo offered many thrills, but to the youthful Henley the most exciting act was when Bill Pickett, Negro cowboy, performed for the first time in public his daring feat which originated the sport of “bulldogging”.

alt="Bill Pickett"

Bill Pickett Made 101 Ranch Wild West Show Popular

Pickett jumped from his horse onto the head of a running steer and threw him by sinking his teeth “bulldog style” in the animal’s tender nostrils. “I never saw anyone with as thick a neck at Pickett had.” Henley says. “The cords were as big a man’s thumb and would stand way out as he strained and twisted with the animal. Of course today the cowboys just throw the steer by hanging on to its horns alone and wrestling it down. But you’ll have to admit it was pretty novel the way ole Pick did it.”

It was a thrill to meet such people who have become ‘the greats’ in our western history – people like Buffalo Bill, Hoot Gibson, Pawnee Bill, Tom Mix, and Will Rogers.”

alt="101 Ranch Wild West Show"

101 Ranch Cherokee Strip

At its zenith the 101 Ranch seasonal employed two to three thousand people. Many of the ranch hands were also performers in the Wild West Show. Although exaggerated and stylized their work and their performance were one and the same. Hollywood actors and other famous people from a number of disciplines were among the attractions. Not all were physical performers but simply famous for their accomplishments.

101 Ranch Wild West Show Movie Stars Included:

Tex McLeod a bronc rider, also was one of the 101’s big four ropers along with Sam Garrett, Hank Darnell, and Chester Byers. He became world champion fancy roper at Calgary in 1912

Ed “Hoot” Gibson spent time performing on 101 Ranch Wild West Shows and won the title of “Cowboy Champion of the World” at the Pendleton, Oregon, Round-Up in 1912 before launching his screen career ad a stuntman and later as one of the western greats of silent and talking films.

Tex Ritter joined the Miller Brothers “ 101” Ranch in 1909 and won numerous rodeo titles throughout the west and later toured for three years with the Sells-Floto Circus and in 1931 signed a contract with Carl Laemmle for six talking pictures.

Cowboy Art Accord, who went from the 101 Ranch wild west show to the movies and recognized for his world championship in bulldogging.

Bill Pickett made the 101 Ranch and Wild West Show famous because of the cowboying and “bulldogging” technique.He went to work on the 101 Ranch in 1905 and remained there for thirty years. He founded the art of “bulldogging”, now known as steer wrestling in the rodeo circuit. He was the first person to slide off a horse onto the back of a running steer, twist its neck forcing the animal to the ground while biting the lip of the steer to hold them down, then theatrically throw his hands into the air.  Pickett traveled through North and South America and England with the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. He was headlined as the “Dusty Demon”. Colonel Zack Miller of the 101 Ranch described Pickett as, “…the greatest sweat-and-dirt cowhand that ever lived-bar none.” In 1923, this working black cowboy was featured in a film produced by the Norman Film Manufacturing Company of Florida titled, “The Bull-dogger”. In advertising for the silent movie, Pickett was described as, “(The) World’s Colored Champion” and the “Colored Hero of the Mexican Bull Ring in Death Defying Feats of Courage and Skill”. In 1932, he was kicked in the head by a horse and died eleven days later on April 4, 1932. Prior to his death he had requested to be buried on Monument Hill. In 1936, the Cherokee Strip Cow Punchers Association erected a simple red sandstone marker at his grave site that simply reads: BILL PICKETT   CSCPA

The 101 Ranch Wild West Show lasted 35 years. From 1905 to 1939 the 101 Ranch Real Wild West Show thrilled audiences and gave life to a bygone era.

 

 

Reference above from the http://internationalindependentshowmensmuseum.org/

SEE OTHER VIDEOS

Jim Rogers, philanthropist, education advocate and owner of KSNV-TV, the NBC television affiliate for Southern Nevada, died Saturday evening at his Las Vegas home Saturday night following a lengthy battle with cancer. A 1956 graduate of Las Vegas High School, Rogers earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting and a law degree, both from the University of Arizona. He also earned a master of law degree from the University of Southern California. In addition to KSNV, Rogers owned several other television stations in the West. Through Rogers’ interest in Western and cowboy movie history he discovered the California town of Lone Pine, which has been used as a venue for movies since the era of Hollywood silent filmmaking. Rogers created and financed “The Beverly and Jim Rogers Lone Pine Film History Museum” that celebrates and preserves the diverse movie history of Lone Pine, Death Valley and the Eastern Sierra where hundreds of films have been shot. Many of the museum displays and memorabilia were found and contributed by Rogers. Rogers also collected more than 300 automobiles, many of which are antiques. All the cars are fully restored and most are functional. His collection celebrates American-made automobiles with a few foreign cars favored by U.S. collectors. Rogers is survived by wife Beverly and three children. You can find more details about his life at the links below.

KSNV TV 
Remembering Jim Rogers
Multiple Videos Chronicling Jim's Career

 
KSNV TV

Las Vegas Sun 

Las Vegas Review Journal

The Republic

Jim's Celebration of life was Saturday, in Las Vegas. The tribute was broadcast live on Jim's NBC Station, KSNV and simultaneously streamed over the Internet. The program is below, you can click on it to view. Also noted below is the Boards thoughts on Jim's contributions to Lone Pine.

 

In the mid-1990s Jim Rogers trailed into Lone Pine, California, the small Eastern Sierra community that annually celebrates Hollywood’s long-standing love affair with the unique landscape of the Alabama Hills. Jim loved the heroes and heroines of classic Hollywood and so it was a natural thing for him to embrace the community and their efforts to celebrate Western heroes like Tom Mix, Roy Rogers, Hopalong Cassidy, The Lone Ranger, Gene Autry and John Wayne, to name a few.

The community leaders had a dream – a dream to build a museum that would pay tribute to many legends of the silver screen, providing for exhibits and archives that would forever tell the story of good versus bad; of white hat over black; of a creed that tells us be good, be honest and  be fair because truth alone lives on forever.

Beverly and Jim Rogers provided support and resources to help the community bring these dreams to reality. He funded administrative and legal support and when the community delivered on its promise of acquiring land Jim immediately put his resources in place to build the structure. Since 2006, the Beverly and Jim Rogers Lone Pine Film History Museum has represented the fulfillment of the dreams of a community and stands as a testimony to Jim Rogers’ generosity. And true to Jim’s own passion, he endowed the Museum with his personal treasures and collectibles including saddles, costumes, cars, posters and memorabilia that have become the foundation of the Museum’s exhibits.


Dreams fulfilled…thanks, Jim Rogers…but your greatest tribute will remain the memories that you provide for countless visitors to the Museum. Grandfathers sharing with their sons and grandsons memories of Saturday matinee B Westerns recognize their favorite Cowboy’s poster, a watch from a cereal carton, a comic book, a bicycle, a badge or one of thousands of other collectibles marketed during their youth. It’s touching to see them reminisce. Their eyes become dreamy and old memories become clear as they tell of their long forgotten childhood.

Thanks, Jim for helping dreams come true and ensuring memories are forever. Happy Trails!

 Dick Jones Dies at 87

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AND, IF YOU'RE A QUILT LOVER  
HERE IS THE NEW 2015 "HAPPY TRAILS QUILT


WINNER of THE HAPPY TRAILS QUILT
Will Be Announced at the 2015 
LONE PINE FILM FESTIVAL 

 The Happy Trails Quilt was originally designed by Pearl P. Pereira. The finished quilt measures 70" x 70" and has 13 patterns featuring western scenes inspired by Pereira' many trips to Texas. This fun quilt pattern includes cowboy boots and silhouettes, wagon wheels, saddles, pistols, flowers and much more. The 24" center block is surrounded by 12" album style blocks. The finishing touch is the barbed wire swag border filled with roses, purple sage, bluebonnets, wagon wheels and stars. The Quilt squares were made by the Mt. Whitney Quilt Guild; final HAND QUILTING by Sue Handley.

Happy_Trails_Quilt

Raffel Tickets are $1.00 each or six for $5.00.  Tickets are available in the Lone Pine Film History Museum Gift Shop. For more information, or if you would like to buy raffle tickets, please call the museum @760-876-9909

 _______________________________________

After our 2013 Film Festival, local Quilter - Linda Kimball, collected a number of the Lone Pine Film Festival T-Shirts from previous years and crafted a remarkable quilt. See below. Linda has donated this beautiful Quilt to the Museum for all to see. It is presently displayed in our North West main annex room.

Festival_Quilt_2013

Quilt__1 Quilt_2 Quilt_3 Quilt__4 Quilt__5
         
Quilt__aa Quilt__bb Quilt__cc Quilt__dd Quilt__ee

 After our 2013 Film Festival, local Quilter - Linda Kimball, collected a number of the Lone Pine Film Festival T-Shirts from previous years and crafted a remarkable quilt. See below. Linda has donated this beautiful Quilt to the Museum for all to see. It is presently displayed in our North West main annex room where you will also find many items of memorabila on Randolph Scott.

The Lone Pine Film Festival's "On Location” tours have allowed thousands of visitors over the years to step back in time and see the dramatic locations from movies featuring legendary actors, directed by many of Hollywood's top directors. These cinematic locations have allowed thousands to stand in the same place that Roy, Gene, Hoppy, The Lone Ranger and John Wayne stood. Many of the locations carry memorable names derived from scenes from movies filmed there; the Hoppy Rock, Lone Ranger Canyon and the Gene Autry Rock to name a few. The location tours were the original idea of Founders Dave Holland and Kerry Powell. 

The Museum is in final negotiations with the Bureau of Land Managment (BLM) providing the Museum a general permit to schedule and coordinate Alabama Hills tours throughout the year for visiting groups. These Alabama Hills tours are subject to local tour guide availability. Private tours of the museum( subject to staff availability) can be scheduled by calling  the front desk @. 760-876-9909. 

For those visitors who like to “do-it-yourself” there is also a fine Self Guided Tour to Locations booklet created through a partnership with the BLM, Lone Pine Film History Museum, and the Lone Pine Chamber of Commerce. The booklet contains pictures, a map and a short narration about each site and the movie that filmed there. It is available for $2 to cover reproduction costs.

Lone Pine's 26th Film Festival, which will be held this year October 9 - 11, provides a range of 10 -12 tours to famous Movie Locations. This year's Festival website is in the process of being updated and  should be complete by late June. Click here for Festival Website.

Fukuhara Graphic 2017 

The 20th Annual Henry Fukuhara Manzanar Workshop

Thursday May 18 to Monday May 22, 2017

Henry and Friends: A Legacy of Giving Back

Fun, camaraderie and artistic inspiration 5 days in the Owens Valley,
at the foot of the Eastern Sierra

 8 Instructional Outdoor Demos and 3 Group Critiques by prominent artist teachers



Highlights of 2017 Workshop
Organized by Albert Setton and his gang, the 20th Annual Henry Fukuhara Manzanar Workshop is now open for enrollment. Approximately 100 artists and their supporters will come to town for a 5-day out door event from Thursday May 18 to Monday May 22, 2017.  Their itinerary calls for the artists to paint at sites in or near Keeler, Alabama Hills, the Manzanar National Historic Site, Owens Lake Bird sanctuary, and Lake Diaz.

It will include 8 Instructional Outdoor Demos and 3 Group Critiques by prominent artist teachers including our own Dan Dickman from Keeler. Also teaching will be Dave Deyell from Thousand Oaks,  Phyllis Doyon from Camarillo, Woody Hansen from Sacramento, Ron Libbrecht from Torrance, Rea Nagel from Van Nuys, David Peterson from Sacramento and Albert Setton from Santa Monica.

For information on how to enroll go to www.apcfinearts.com, hover on Workshop to reveal the dropdown menu and click on Workshop 2017.  For a peek at last year’s workshop locations, instructors and group digital show click on Workshop Gallery 2016


Critiques will take place at the theater in the Museum of Western Fillm History on Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

 
Organized by Albert Setton. Assisted by Shelley Pearson; Dan Dickman;
Ron Libbrecht & Jeanette Pauer

 To Enroll: 

1. Send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with your name, address, email, and phone #.
2. Send a check for $150.00 made out to Michele Pearson and mail to:
Michele Pearson, 1244 12th Street, Unit 5, Santa Monica 90401.

For questions or more information contact: 
Shelley: (310) 663-9582 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Al: (310) 428 0051 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

If this is your first Workshop also send/email your contact info  (address, phone, email)

 

* Work submitted for group critiques must be painted during the 2017 workshop, must be at or near completion, must be ¼ sheet (11x15) or larger and must be presented in a mat along with the artist’s plan for the painting. All other works can receive individual critiques during Office Hours.
 
 
A few words On Henry Fukuhara & The Workshop

Fukuhara ImageAccording to a wonderful tribute written by fellow watercolor artist John Salchak, Henry Fukuhara was born in Los Angeles in 1913 and he developed a strong interest in art while in high school. He briefly studied at the Otis Art Institute and showed promise as an up-and-coming artist until, during World War II, at the age of 29, Fukuhara, along with his wife and two young daughters, were sent to the Japanese-American Relocation Center at Manzanar. After being released in 1944, he moved with his family to New York where he joined his father and brother in the wholesale flower business, leaving little time for art.

In 1972, he once again took up painting and quickly developed his own unique personal style. It was not long before he began winning awards and his artwork was being shown in numerous galleries. According to Salchak’s tribute, Fukuhara discovered that he enjoyed teaching and taught many workshops around the country. When Fukuhara and his family moved back to Santa Monica, Calif. in 1987, he continued teaching and mentoring others.

It was in 1998 that he began returning to Manzanar to conduct workshops in watercolor. Because of failing health and eyesight, Fukuhara no longer was able to attend the workshops after 2005, and he passed away in 2010 at the age of 96. His artistic legacy lives on in the workshops that have continued under the aegis of Al Setton, a friend, artist, and great admirer of Fukuhara. He and others are determined to keep the art and memory of Henry Fukuhara alive.

According to Setton, all of the instructors and organizers donate their time to keep the workshop affordable and to encourage artists of all levels to attend. As the organizer of the event, Setton went on to say that treading in Henry’s footsteps was an honor, a privilege, and a large responsibility.

Setton explained that this is an opportunity for professional and amateur artists to get together with others whose artwork reflects their own unique and personal expression. Over the 20 years of the workshop, the artists have painted at various locations in the Alabama Hills, the Manzanar Historic site, Lone Pine, Independence, Keeler and Olancha. There is more information on the annual workshop to be found by visiting www.AlSetton.com.

The visiting workshop artists repeatedly comment on the beauty of the area and the remarkable friendliness, cooperation, and hospitality of the people that live in the area. Speaking of the weather, the group has painted in high wind, dust, cold and snowy conditions. They have had occasion to seek shelter at the Lone Pine airport, as well as the Boulder Creek RV Park. According to Setton however, the majority of the time the weather has been perfect, with sunny blue skies and a slight breeze — perfect for outdoor painting.

The Museum of Western Film History provides its theatre for critiques and the Best Western Motel serves as the local headquarters while the group is in the area. The Lone Pine Chamber of Commerce has also been very supportive, as has local resident and professional artist Dan Dickman of Keeler who, according to Setton, has been an invaluable, facilitator and host; serving as both location finder and local guide.

June 7th - Jazz Comes West

Experience classical jazz and a love of cowboy heritage

with a New York posse of America’s leading jazz performers:

 

CLICK Here FOR DETAILS
Save_The_Date_5_00_x_4_00_72_DPI

MONTY ALEXANDER Trio

  Hassan Shakur Bass
  Jeff Hamilton Drums

    and Special Guest - Frank Vignola Guitar
 
and a Special Tribute to America’s  Last “Singing Cowboy”

The Bronze Buckaroo –
at 100 Years! Herb Jeffries


Featuring Vocalist Allan Harris
Click Names for Bios 
 


Listen to these Jazz Greats 

 Alexander   Shakur   Hamilton   Vignola   Harris 

Rex_on_Stage_06_02_2013_RWS_200 Piano_2 Dinner_2__200JG
Rex_on_Stage_3__06_02_2013_RWS200 Piano_1 Stage_PP_200


Lone Ranger Canyon


CONCERT IN THE ROCKS

Saturday  June 7th, 2014
Collage_72_dpi_600_x

Every June, the magnificent Lone Ranger Canyon, located in the Alabama Hills, is transformed into an “under the stars” venue for hosting the annual Lone Pine – “Concert in the Rocks.” The evening begins with a welcoming reception in the museum for annual members. Following the reception, members and other attendees are transported to the Alabama Hills for a country steak dinner preceding the show. 


When the entertainment starts, the evening sky is displaying early stars and the setting sun’s shadows are long on the canyon-floor as the discreetly hidden lights create unique and mysterious shadows on the canyon walls. Master of Ceremonies  for the evening - Larry Maurice
 

SCHEDULE:
boot_ImageCocktail reception for Lone Pine Film History Museum Members 4:30

boot_ImageShuttle bus starts at 5.00 from the museum. (members and other attendees)

boot_ImageSit down dinner of Steak plus vegetarian option begins at 6:00

boot_ImagePay bar (wine, beer, sprits)

boot_ImageWater and soft drinks provided

boot_ImageConcert commences at dusk

boot_ImageReturn shuttle around 9:00 pm after the concert ends


CONCERT AND DINNER IN THE ALABAMA HILLS
$80.00
per person

CALL MUSEUM FOR TICKETSl
 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Please note; Concert Ticket purchases are FINAL. There are NO refunds


Staying the Night
Check out our Visitor Guide links for 
Local Motels

Best_Western  Comfort_Inn  Dow_Villa

 ________________________________________________________________________________

History of Lone Ranger Canyon

While details differ, the basic story of the origin of the Lone Ranger is the same in most versions of the franchise. Six Texas Rangers are drawn into a remote canyon and ambushed by a band of outlaws led by Bartholomew "Butch" Cavendish. All are left for dead.

Later, a young Indian named Tonto stumbles on the scene and recognizes the lone survivor, Ranger Reid (whose first name was never given), as the man who had saved his life at some time in the past. He nurses Reid back to health after digging six graves for Reid's comrades, so that Cavendish will think there were no survivors, forgetting that Cavendish thought he had killed seven men in that canyon, including the traitorous scout who led the Rangers into the trap. Among them is Reid's brother, Captain Daniel Reid, who is a Captain of the Texas Rangers. Tonto fashions a black Domino mask using material from Captain Reid's vest to conceal the Lone Ranger's identity. Even after the Cavendish gang is brought to justice, Reid continues to fight for law and order against evil and crime under the guise of the Lone Ranger.

Yes, Kimosabes, that ambush happened in The Alabama Hills near Lone Pine, California, in what is now called Lone Ranger Canyon. Each year, the Lone Pine community and Lone Pine Film History Museum pay tribute to the heritage of the canyon’s history by transforming the dramatic canyon into a magical entertainment venue under the Eastern Sierra stars.

Manzanar_Fishing_Club_DVDSCREENING MARCH 15th - 7:00 PM
Presented by Metabolic Studios and The Eastern California Museum

Locked away in the California desert, more than 10,000 Americans of Japanese descent faced an uncertain future at the World War II internment camp at Manzanar. Armed Military Police, guard towers and barbed wire sent the clear message that they were prisoners in their own country.


The Manzanar Fishing Club is the uplifting tale of those who sought and found moments of freedom by escaping the Camp to fish the surrounding waters of the famed Eastern Sierra. And in the process, they gave new meaning to the old phrase, "Gone Fishing." Running time: 74:02 min. Directed by Cory Shiozaki. Written by Richard Imamura.




Cory Shiozaki and Richard Imamura, 
the two filmmakers behind 
“The Manzanar Fishing Club” 
will be on hand Saturday to talk 
about the film and answer questions.

Manzanar_Fishing_Club_Cory_Shiozaki_and_Richard_Imamura

THE MANZANAR FISHING CLUB began as a lecture, walking tour and artifacts exhibit to raise awareness of the internees who slipped away under the cover of night to find freedom and adventure matching wits with the prized trout of the Sierra Nevada's high-altitude lakes and streams.

This creative treatment of actual events is the brainchild of cinematographer-turned-director Cory Shiozaki. An avid fisherman whose parents were among the 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent who were rounded up in the immediate aftermath of Pearl Harbor, Cory has spent the past six years chronicling the untold story of this overlooked chapter in U.S. history.

The project moved to the next level when fellow anglers and video production company principals Lester Chung and John Gengl proposed interviewing the surviving internee fishermen for a documentary film.

Writer Richard Imamura pored over hours and hours of interviews and expanded the project from a 22-minute short into a feature length documentary. His script brought together what Shiozaki had intuitively known all along — that all of the fishermen's stories touched, in one way or another, on a yearning to be free

MANZANAR FISHING WEBSITE

  Poster_Concert_Rocks_for_2014_12_x_18_Final_72_dpi Monty_Alexander__1_Jazz_Chart

Experience classical jazz and a love of cowboy heritage

with a New York posse of America’s leading jazz performers:
 

MONTY ALEXANDER Trio

  Hassan Shakur Bass
  Jeff Hamilton Drums

    and Special Guest - Frank Vignola Guitar
 
and a Special Tribute to America’s  Last “Singing Cowboy”

The Bronze Buckaroo – at 100 Years! Herb Jeffries


Featuring Vocalist Allan Harris
Click Names for Bios 
 
Listen to these Jazz Greats 

 Alexander   Shakur   Hamilton   Vignola   Harris 

 Read more about One of America's Greatest Jazz Musicans - Monty Alexander

Rex_on_Stage_06_02_2013_RWS_200 Piano_2 Dinner_2__200JG
Rex_on_Stage_3__06_02_2013_RWS200 Piano_1 Stage_PP_200


Lone Ranger Canyon


CONCERT IN THE ROCKS

Saturday  June 7th, 2014
Collage_72_dpi_600_x

Every June, the magnificent Lone Ranger Canyon, located in the Alabama Hills, is transformed into an “under the stars” venue for hosting the annual Lone Pine – “Concert in the Rocks.” The evening begins with a welcoming reception in the museum for annual members. Following the reception, members and other attendees are transported to the Alabama Hills for dinner preceding the show. 


When the entertainment starts, the evening sky is displaying early stars and the setting sun’s shadows are long on the canyon-floor as the discreetly hidden lights create unique and mysterious shadows on the canyon walls. Master of Ceremonies for the evening - Larry Maurice
 

SCHEDULE:
boot_ImageCocktail reception for Lone Pine Film History Museum Members 4:30

boot_ImageShuttle bus starts at 5.00 from the museum. (members and other attendees)
 

boot_ImageSit down dinner of Steak plus vegetarian option begins at 6:00

boot_ImagePay bar (wine, beer, sprits)

boot_ImageWater and soft drinks provided

boot_ImageConcert commences at dusk

boot_ImageReturn shuttle around 9:00 pm after the concert ends


CONCERT AND DINNER IN THE ALABAMA HILLS
$80.00
per person DINNER SOLD OUT

A Limited Amount of
CONCERT ONLY TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE

$60.00 per person

CALL MUSEUM FOR DETAILSl
 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

A select number of tables are available with Premium Seating


Please call Museum to book (760-876-9909)

Table of  Eight - $800.00


Table of Ten - $1000.00


Please note; Concert Ticket purchases are FINAL. There are NO refunds

Staying the Night
Check out our Visitor Guide links for 
Local Motels
Best_Western  Comfort_Inn  Dow_Villa
_____________________________________

Jazz Magazines & Websites

http://www.smoothjazzmag.com/ 

History of Lone Ranger Canyon

While details differ, the basic story of the origin of the Lone Ranger is the same in most versions of the franchise. Six Texas Rangers are drawn into a remote canyon and ambushed by a band of outlaws led by Bartholomew "Butch" Cavendish. All are left for dead.

Later, a young Indian named Tonto stumbles on the scene and recognizes the lone survivor, Ranger Reid (whose first name was never given), as the man who had saved his life at some time in the past. He nurses Reid back to health after digging six graves for Reid's comrades, so that Cavendish will think there were no survivors, forgetting that Cavendish thought he had killed seven men in that canyon, including the traitorous scout who led the Rangers into the trap. Among them is Reid's brother, Captain Daniel Reid, who is a Captain of the Texas Rangers. Tonto fashions a black Domino mask using material from Captain Reid's vest to conceal the Lone Ranger's identity. Even after the Cavendish gang is brought to justice, Reid continues to fight for law and order against evil and crime under the guise of the Lone Ranger.

Yes, Kimosabes, that ambush happened in The Alabama Hills near Lone Pine, California, in what is now called Lone Ranger Canyon. Each year, the Lone Pine community and Lone Pine Film History Museum pay tribute to the heritage of the canyon’s history by transforming the dramatic canyon into a magical entertainment venue under the Eastern Sierra stars.


THANK YOU TO ALL OUR SPONSORS

Aldridge_Bonnefin_Logo_72_dpi BLM_Logo Crystal_Geyser_Logo

Dow_Villa

ALDRICH BONNEFIN & MOORE

Alabama Hills Cafe

Best Western Frontier
Bureau of Land Management
Bonanza Restaurant
Boulder Creek RV
Dow Villa

El Dorado Savings
Gardner's True Value Hardware
Jim Walters - Portal Preserve
Joseph's Bi-Rite
Lees's Frontier
Lone Pine Drugstore
Lone Star Bistro
Merry Go-Round
McDonalds
Miller's Towing
Mt. Whitney Hostel

Mt. Whitney Restaurant
Owenyo Services

Pizza Factory
Season's Restaurant
Totem Cafe
Whitney Portal Store
_________________________________________________________ 

Sharon McBryde & Carole Freeman

Kerry Powell
Martin Powell
Travis Powell
Judy & Glen Fowler
Bev & Dean VanderWall
Jaque & Art Hickman
Dick & Nan Gering
Anissa Eaton

Staff of the Lone Pine Film History Museum

Dorothy Bonnefin
Jude Greenburgh
Catherine Kravitz
Nancy Prather
Karen Stewart

Our Emcee, Larry Maurice and

and to the many others in the community that contribute their time and support to ensure a great evening.


Jazz_Comes_West_Banner

 

La France arrive à la Sierra-Orient sur la Saint Valentin

France comes to the Eastern Sierra on Valentines Day

 

Join us

BUY TICKETS NOW
Special "Stay the Night "Room Rates
See Below 

Friday February 14
when The Lone Pine Film History Museum
becomes Le Cafe de Lone Pine on the 701 Rue Principale


Enjoy a romantic Sierra evening and the culinary tastes of French haute cuisine from our own French Chef, Pierre Valeille.

Valentine_Day_Invitation_Final 
5:30 - The evening begins with selection of French Cheeses

6:30 - A traditional French Classic Coq au vin and garden salade of light greens with White Balsamic vinaigrette

8:00 - Enjoy the Academy Award winning movie - "The Artist" in our Theater

The_Arttist_2

Immediately after the Movie... ENJOY  

9:45 - Dessert - A Scrumptious Chocolate Kalua Expresso Surprise
                 served with Port & Coffee

***French Wines this evening presented by Lone Pine’s Women Wine Club

Reservations a must

Please pay and reserve on line

BUY TICKETS NOW

$45.00 per person

 Seating limited to 80

STAY THE NIGHT

A Special Evening Rate Rate is Available 
for this Event at...
The Best Western (760-876-5571)
The Comfort Inn (
760-876-8700)
The Dow Villa (
760/876-5571)

 Call Motel Directly for Reservations & Details 

 

The Artist 

The_Artist A crowd-pleasing tribute to the magic of silent cinema, The Artist is a clever, joyous film with delightful performances and visual style to spare. 

It's the late 1920s in Hollywood and handsome George Valentin is a silent movie idol. During the premiere of his latest film, Valentin meets Peppy Miller, a star-struck extra and aspiring actress. The two are attracted to each other and Peppy is given a small dancing role in his next picture. As their romance progresses, Valentin's producer has to cope with a love-struck star who is distracted on the set, Peppy's career begins to take off, and Valentin fears that a new fad in the movie business--talkies--will ruin him.

Nominated for ten Academy Awards and won five, including Best Picture, Best Director for Hazanavicius, and Best Actor for Dujardin, who was the first French actor ever to win for Best Actor. It was the first French film to ever win Best Picture and the first mainly silent film to win since 1927's Wings won at the 1st Academy Awards in 1929. It was also the first film presented in the 4:3 aspect ratio to win since 1955's Marty. Additionally, it was the first black-and-white film to win since 1993's Schindler's List, though that film contained limited colour sequences; it was the first 100% black-and-white film to win since 1960's The Apartment.

In France, it was nominated for ten César Awards, winning six, including Best Film, Best Director for Hazanavicius and Best Actress for Bejo. The Artist became the most awarded French film in history.

 

Logo

WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL SCREENING
Lone Pine - Friday December 6th   7:00 PM

Tickets

Tickets are $12 or free with a new or renewed Friends of the Inyo membership. 

Doors open at 6:15 pm; show starts at 7 pm for the Wild & Scenic Film Festival.
Friday, November 22nd in Mammoth Lakes, 

Saturday, November 23rd in Bishop, and Friday,

December 6th in Lone Pine. 
Hope to see you there!

Purchase tickets in advance at The Booky Joint, Wilson's Eastside Sports or
Friends of the Inyo or by calling 760-873-6500.

Wild__Scenic_2013

 
 

Sponsored by Friends of Inyo

Metabolic Studios to sponsor

                   100 Mule Team Trek – Owens Valley to Los Angeles

   Event commemorates 100 year anniversary opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct

By Jon Klusmire
August 9, 2013Aqueduct_construction

It’s hard to match the physical scale and impact of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, but walking 100 mules along the length of the aqueduct, from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles, might match the aqueduct for sheer audacity and could top the 100-year old structure when it comes to creating a landscape-scale artwork.

The mule caravan will also likely be the most visible, unique, and, in some situations, unavoidable event marking the 100-year anniversary of the completion of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, which started bringing water from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles on Nov. 5, 1913.

“On the centenary of the opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, Lauren Bon and the Metabolic Studio will perform ‘One Hundred Mules Walking the Los Angeles Aqueduct,’ a commemorative artist action to connect Los Angeles to its water supply,” noted a press release from the Metabolic Studio.

“Many people on Los Angeles don’t know their water comes from 240 miles away,” Bon said when announcing project at the Metabolic Studio’s studio, located in downtown Los Angeles, on July 26. 

What is a Mule?
Mule

A 100-mule caravan marching 240 miles for 27 days along the LA Aqueduct will remind Los Angeles residents of their city’s history by providing “an experience with water” that has come from the Sierra Nevada for 100 years, she noted. The sight of 100 mules walking along the Aqueduct could lead Southern California and Los Angeles residents to the conclusion that “they are passing through their neighbors’ property,” when traveling through the Owens Valley, since “that is where their water comes from,” Bon noted. 

The mule train pays homage to water history, but it is also is intended to make a statement about the future of water in Los Angeles. “One Hundred Mules Walking the Aqueduct is an action with a resolution to move forward into the next 100 years with renewed appreciation for this vital resource,” Bon said. “Let it be resolved that the citizens of Los Angeles will do everything possible to make the best use of this life giving resource in the next 100 years.” 

Aqueduct_construction_2
Trekking with mules alongside the canals and pipelines of the gravity fed aqueduct as it snakes through three counties and nearly 50 communities, is one way to raise consciousness about the city’s water infrastructure and invite “direct contact” with the resourc
e and its conveyance, she added. 

 
Many Angelenos will probably not be able to avoid “direct contact” with the mules. The final legs of the expedition will take place in the San Fernando Valley and the City of Los Angeles. The traveling troupe will arrive at the Cascades, where the Aqueduct ends, on Nov. 5, 2013, to mark the 100th anniversary of the opening of the aqueduct. The herd will then take part in a Veteran’s Day Parade in Glendale, so the mules will receive “a heroic welcome from the City of Los Angeles that is long overdue,” Bon said. 

The expedition will come to a final stop in Griffith Park at, where else, the William Mulholland Fountain. There, people can mingle with the mules, and “we’ll have a big square dance and community potluck,” Bon suggested. 

Putting the focus on the mules will honor the role mules played in shaping the west in general, and the LA Aqueduct, which “was built by the labor of mules,” she noted. 

Aqueduct_construction_3 Handling the logistics of the mass of mules will be Jen Roeser, who with husband Lee are long-time owners of the McGee Creek Pack Station. She said there will be 25-35 people on the Mule Walk, with a wrangler assigned to each string of 10 mules. A group of up to 10 support vehicles will supply feed and water for the mules and riders, portable corrals, camping gear, a veterinarian, a truck to haul off the mule manure, and other essentials outlined in the various permits and permissions for the event, she said.

The entire action has been coordinated with and approved by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, who Bon called a “more responsive agency than many people know.” 
Bon and one other member of the Metabolic Studio plan to ride the whole route. The riders and those watching will be able to enjoy “the magic of 100 mules walking” through a striking landscape. 

Once the mules stop, though, there will be opportunities for people to “drop by camp” or participate in various public events along the route. 

Aqueduct_construction_4
The mules will start their journey at the Aqueduct Intake, and the first public event will be held near Manzanar. The group will spilt in two and circle the Owens Dry Lake, and then have another event near Haiwee Reservoir, “where water and power come together,” Bon noted.

The walking art work will proceed through Red Rock Canyon, to Mojave and through the Mojave Desert. There will be a two-day stop at Holiday Lake and the California Aqueduct for a “block party” to recognize “the people taking care of our water supply,” Bon said. The convoy will then proceed to the Cascades and the final, urban leg of its journey.

 


Lone Pine


Annual High School Reunion

June 20 - 23, 2013

 

Book your hotel/motel rooms now !

EVENTS:

Thursday 20th

Golf Tournament  9 A.M.   $50.00 (cart included) 

 

Friday 21th and Saturday 22st
Reunion Registration - Lone Pine Park

 

Saturday 22nd
Bar-B.Q Dinner Lone Pine Lions Club, $12.00  5 - 8 P.M.

 

Reunion Dance 8 - 12 P.M.
Community Building, across from the Dow

Live Music featuring The Canela Band for Dancing, & Visiting

Fund Raiser for Lone Pine Film History Museum  $15.00 per person at door.

Saturday’s reunion dance will feature The Canela Band for your entertainment and dancing pleasure.  Together for over 40 years, the band mixes a repertoire of present and original music with classic songs from the 40's 50', 60's.  Outstanding three part vocal harmonies are a signature to their music but fans always love to hear, drummer, Cougar Estrada,  who toured the World  when playing with LOS LOBOS;  and the amazing  horn section with Andy on tromboneand Rosie on Sax.  A reunion you will always remember, not only for seeing good friends, but enjoying great music!

CANELA_JUNE_22_2013-1


































Sunday 23rd
V.F.W. Breakfast  8 A.M.

REUNION_2013_rev_72_dpi

Photo's above from 1997 reunion book

 

Lone Pine High School FACEBOOK Page

Lone Pine High School Alumni Page

Lone Pine High School Wep Page

 

 

 

 

Lone Pine Chamber of Commerce

Alabama_Hills_Day_2014_Poster_72_dpi

3rd Annual
Alabama Hills Day
Saturday, April 12th
Press Release:

Come celebrate the 3rd Annual “Alabama Hills Day” on Saturday, April 12th from 9am to 3pm in Lone Pine, CA. The purpose of the event is to celebrate this scenic landscape and educate the public about the wide variety of groups/activities that access & interact with the Alabama’s.

 

Over forty different sponsors/exhibitors will be lending their support for the Alabama Hills at “The Building” - Convention Center at 325 South Main Street, Lone Pine, CA. The Lone Pine Museum of Film History will also host a variety of exhibits, films and lectures for the general public to enjoy and be educated about this fantastic natural landscape. Various field trips and a stewardship event will also be taking place in the Alabama Hills themselves. 

KIBS radio will be on-hand from 10 am until noon to do a live remote broadcast and interview people that are passionate about the Alabama Hills! Food and live entertainment will also be provided.

Museum Theater Event Schedule
9:00 AM Movie History Discussion - Chris Langley
10:00 AM  Photography Presentation
11:00  Alabama Hills - Classic TV & Commercials - Bob Sigman
12:00 Alabama Hills Stewardship Group - Kevin Mazzu
1:00 PM Paiute Shoshone Cultural Resources  - Kathy Bancroft/Ray Hunter
2:00 PM Climbing in the Eastern Sierra - Myles Moser & Amy Ness
 
TO DOWNLOAD COMPLETE SCHEDULE
AND CONTACT INFO CLICK HERE

The Alabama Hills Stewardship Group, Inc. would like to invite the public to participate in this special event. Adults and children are welcome and attendance is free! Bring your family and friends and come out to show your support for the Alabama Hills and enjoy a unique learning experience!

The AHSG, Inc. is committed to the stewardship of the Alabama Hills and partnering with the BLM to protect the jaw-dropping beauty of this semi-primitive landscape with continued access for such diverse groups as hikers, motorists, photographers, rock climbers, campers and fisherman as well as allowing important economic activities like commercial filming, cattle grazing and hunting to continue. Balancing all these needs is what makes the Alabama Hills so special to so many people and necessitates its protection. 

 

So please join the Alabama Hills Stewardship Group and all our stakeholders in supporting the future of this fantastic landscape by participating in the 3rd Annual “Alabama Hills Day” on Saturday, April 12th, 2014!

 

For more information please call:

 

                    Chris Langley – AHSG, Inc. President
Kevin Mazzu – AHSG, Inc. Vice-President
 (760) 937-1189 /  (760) 784-5494

         Or go on-line at:

           alabamahillsstewardshipgroup.org

___________________________________________________________________________________________

Press Release:

 “Alabama Hills Day” shaping up to be bigger and better!

 Saturday, April 12th, 2014

 

Co-sponsored by the Alabama Hills Stewardship Group, Inc.

& the Bureau of Land Management – Bishop Field Office

In partnership with the Lone Pine Film History Museum

 Come celebrate the 3rd Annual “Alabama Hills Day” on Saturday, April 12th from 9am to 3pm in Lone Pine, CA. The purpose of the event is to celebrate this scenic landscape and educate the public about the wide variety of groups/activities that access & interact with the Alabama’s. 
 

Thirty-five different exhibitors will be lending their support for the scenic Alabama Hills at“The Building” - Convention Center at 325 South Main Street, Lone Pine, CA. The Lone Pine Film History Museum will also host a variety of exhibits, films and lectures for the general public to enjoy and be educated about this fantastic natural landscape. Various field trips and a stewardship event will also take place in the Alabama Hills themselves: Take a helicopter flight; ride your mountain bike; rock climb; join a geology, photo, natural history, birding, movie or native plant tour; learn to map read and gold mine; join in to help with a trail restoration project or just take a hike!
 

KIBS radio will be on-hand from 10 am until noon to do a live remote broadcast, MC’ed by Richard Reel who will interview people that are passionate about the Alabama Hills! ‘Smokey Bear’ will make an appearance as well as some special ‘critters’ from Eastern Sierra Wildlife Care! 
 

The Alabama Hills Stewardship Group, Inc. would like to invite the public to participate in this special event. Adults and children are welcome and attendance is free! Bring your family and friends and come out to show your support for the Alabama Hills and enjoy a unique learning experience!
 

The AHSG, Inc. is committed to the stewardship of the Alabama Hills and partnering with the BLM to protect the jaw-dropping beauty of this semi-primitive landscape with continued access for such diverse groups as hikers, motorists, photographers, rock climbers, campers and fisherman as well as allowing important economic activities like commercial filming, cattle grazing and hunting to continue. Balancing all these needs is what makes the Alabama Hills so special to so many people and necessitates its protection. 

 

Please join the Alabama Hills Stewardship Group and all our stakeholders in supporting the future of this fantastic landscape by participating in our 3rd Annual “Alabama Hills Day” on Saturday, April 12th, 2014!

For more information please call: 

Chris Langley – AHSG, Inc. President                        (760) 937-1189

Kevin Mazzu – AHSG, Inc. Vice-President                 (760) 784-5494

Special "On Location Tour” JOHN_WAYNE_72

Scheduled

for Saturday June 1, 2013


STANDARD_TOUR_72dpiThe Lone Pine Film Festival's "On Location” tours have allowed thousands of visitors over the years to step back in time and see the dramatic locations from movies featuring legendary actors, directed by many of Hollywood's top directors. These cinematic locations have allowed thousands to stand in the same place that Roy, Gene, Hoppy, The Lone Ranger and John Wayne stood. Many of the locations carry memorable names derived from scenes from movies filmed there; the Hoppy Rock, Lone Ranger Canyon and the Gene Autry Rock to name a few.

Concert_Pass_Tour_sm

Our Museum Executive Director, Chris Langley will be hosting a special Saturday morning, June 1, open to those attending the Concert in the Rocks evening. This special tour, $10.00 per person) is approximately 1.5 hours and will visit several sites. You will start with Ruiz Hill where you see Gunga Din battle locations, and where the railroad tunnel for Tycoon, starring John Wayne was located. Also sites from Tom Mix’s Riders of the Purple Sage  (1925), Gene Autry’s Cow Town and Robert Mitchum’s first starring role in Nevada are seen.

Gunga_din_1Tour cost: $10.00 per person
Tickets available through Museum desk:
Please call 760-876-9909 to schedule

Tour will leave museum at 10:00 AM sharp as a car caravan.Tickets can be picked up at Museum front desk on Friday and or after 9:00 AM on Saturday before tour.

 

 

A GREAT EVENING

To Our Guests & Sponsors... A VERY BIG "THANK YOU"
and to Rex Allen Jr. for an entertaining night and fond rememberances of his dad.

A few Pics...more to come
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Lone Ranger Canyon


CONCERT IN THE ROCKS

Save_The_Date_72_dpi_4_x_6Saturday  June 1, 2013

Starring


Rex Allen Jr
.


Every June, the magnificent Lone Ranger Canyon is transformed into an incredible venue for hosting our annual June Concert in the Rocks. The evening begins with a welcoming reception in the museum for annual members. Then, members and other attendees are transported to the Alabama Hills for a country steak dinner that precedes the show. When the entertainment starts, the evening sky is displaying early stars and the setting sun’s shadows are long on the canyon floor as the discreetly hidden lights create unique and mysterious shadows on the canyon walls.
 
Collage_72_dpi_600_xThis year’s entertainment brings an old friend, Rex Allen Jr., back to Lone Pine. Blessed with a golden voice inherited from his father, singing cowboy legend Rex Allen, demonstrates a true dedication to his own music and career. Rex Jr. is the consummate Singer/Entertainer with over 50 hit songs, including “It’s Over”, “One Lonely Night”, and “Two Less Lonely People” among others. As a regular member of the cast of The Statler Brothers Show and its spinoff Yesteryear for its full eight year run on The Nashville Network, Rex Allen Jr. is truly a “Living Legacy” of Country and Western Music.

Rex_Allen_72_dpiRex_Allen_CD_Collection








 

                          "Click Picture to enlarge"    

“Just when you think you’ve done everything, you get invited to take Western Music to China!” says Rex, “ It will always be a feather in my cowboy hat to be the first performer ever allowed to sing on The Great Wall Of China. And now The Western Music Association is inducting me into their Hall Of Fame. What an honor!!” 2012 brought another honor to Rex when the State Of Arizona declared Rex’s song “I Love You Arizona” the official song of the Arizona centennial. “Another great honor” says Rex, “ My family is so proud, and I know my father would be busting his buttons!”


Visit Rex's website -  http://www.rexallenjr.com


 

boot_Image
CALL Museum
To inquire
about ticket Availability

760-876-9909

SCHEDULE:
boot_ImageCocktail reception for Lone Pine Film History Museum Members 4:30

boot_ImageShuttle bus starts at 5.00 from the museum. (members and other attendees)

boot_ImageSit down dinner of Steak plus vegetarian option begins at 6:00

boot_ImagePay bar (wine, beer, sprits)

boot_ImageWater and soft drinks provided

boot_ImageConcert commences at dusk

boot_ImageReturn shuttle around 9:00 pm after the concert ends


CONCERT AND DINNER IN THE ALABAMA HILLS
$80.00
per person


Click on panel on right to purchase tickets

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

A select number of tables are available with Premium Seating


Please call Museum to book (760-876-9909)

Table of  Eight - $800.00


Table of Ten - $1000.00


Please note; Concert Ticket purchases are FINAL. There are NO refunds

Last of The Silver Screen Cowboys

A sampling Of Rex Allen Jr.
 

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History of Lone Ranger Canyon

While details differ, the basic story of the origin of the Lone Ranger is the same in most versions of the franchise. Six Texas Rangers are drawn into a remote canyon and ambushed by a band of outlaws led by Bartholomew "Butch" Cavendish. All are left for dead.

Later, a young Indian named Tonto stumbles on the scene and recognizes the lone survivor, Ranger Reid (whose first name was never given), as the man who had saved his life at some time in the past. He nurses Reid back to health after digging six graves for Reid's comrades, so that Cavendish will think there were no survivors, forgetting that Cavendish thought he had killed seven men in that canyon, including the traitorous scout who led the Rangers into the trap. Among them is Reid's brother, Captain Daniel Reid, who is a Captain of the Texas Rangers. Tonto fashions a black Domino mask using material from Captain Reid's vest to conceal the Lone Ranger's identity. Even after the Cavendish gang is brought to justice, Reid continues to fight for law and order against evil and crime under the guise of the Lone Ranger.

Yes, Kimosabes, that ambush happened in The Alabama Hills near Lone Pine, California, in what is now called Lone Ranger Canyon. Each year, the Lone Pine community and Lone Pine Film History Museum pay tribute to the heritage of the canyon’s history by transforming the dramatic canyon into a magical entertainment venue under the Eastern Sierra stars.


THANK YOU TO ALL OUR SPONSORS

BLM_Logo Crystal_Geyser_Logo Best_Western DWP

Alabama Hills Cafe
Best Western Frontier
Bonanza Restaurant
Boulder Creek RV
Dow Villa

El Doradoo Savings
Gardner's True Value Hardware
Joseph's Bi-Rite
Lees's Frontier
Lone Pine Drugstore
Lone Star Bistro
Merry Go-Round

Miller's Towing
Mt. Whitney Hostel
Mt. Whitmey Restaurant
Owenyo Services

Pizza Factory
Season's Restaurant
Totem Cafe
Whitney Portal Store

John & Mary Knowlton

 

Sharon McBryde & Carole Freeman

Kerry Powell
Martin Powell
Travis Powell
Judy & Glen Fowler
Bev & Dean VanderWall
Jaque & Art Hickman
Dick & Nan Gering
Anissa Eaton


Our Emcee, Larry Maurice and

The Wonderful, Rex Allen Jr.

and to the many others in the community that contributed their time and support to ensure a great evening.

















Martinez Saddle - 2013 Rose Parade

Courtesy of Bob Lorbeer and the Long Beach Mounted Police
2013_Rose_Parade_
More info and pics soon

Coming Soon

Work in Progress page

Museum_Postcards_General_small_72dpi



Membership


WHAT'S IN IT FOR YOU?

Membership has its privlidges! The first, being a member of a very special museum whose board and members are dedicated to preserving the heritage of Western Film and film-making; the heroes and heroines of the Saturday matininee silver screen and the possee of shows that graced the TV screen in the 80's; early pioneers in directing, producing; the sidekicks and stunt guys. Your membership keeps them with us!

 

 

 

And, yes, there are the more tangible benefits -unlimited free general admission, newsletters, discounts and more - see below.

 

List of benefits:

    • Free unlimited admission to the museum
    • Invitation to all "membership only"museum events, previews, concerts, exhibit openings, art show receptions, book signings
    • Email notifications of news and happenings
    • Monthly Newsletter with program, exhibit and promotional updates
    • Free movie nights
    • Bonus 4 free "visitor guest tickets" per year
    • 10% discount on books, DVDs, CDs and other memorabila and collectible merchandise in our gift shop and on-line store.
    • Special On-line Product offers
    • Free admission to June Concert - Museum Members reception
    • Members automatically become “Friends of the Festival” and receive:
      •  20% Discount on Annual Festival Tickets
      •  50% Discount on Annual Festival Reception
    • Opportunity to become a Volunteer

    • Opportunity to become a Volunteer
    • Free admission to June Concert Members reception

    • 20% Discount on Annual Festival Tickets

    • 50% Discount on Annual Festival Reception

Downloadable Application   Join Online

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AC_Banner
Celebrating the American West


American Cowboy, the cultural chronicler of the American West, provides engaging stories and gorgeous photos about all aspects of contemporary Western living, from people and travel, to history and equine pursuits. The enduring spirit of the cowboy drives content on the magazines pages and brings over 45,000 readers to their bi-monthly newsletter.

Join the Museum this month, purchasing any one of our membership programs on-line and you will receive:

1. Your selected membership with respective benefits.

2. Two FREE issues of the 2013 American Cowboy Magazine

Subscription will start within 30 days.

Click here to go to Membership page.

 

Montie_Montana_72dpiMontie Montana, whose first trick roping performance was at the 1925 Miles City, Mont., rodeo, claimed each performance was just as exciting to him as that first one. At 17 he joined the Buck Jones Show, trick roping and riding and training horses. Arena announcers had difficulty with his name – Owen Harlen Mickel – and usually introduced him as “Montie from Montana.” In 1929 he adopted the name and used it his entire career. Montana joined the professional ranks in 1938 and starred in every major arena in the United States, Mexico, and Canada, as well as many other countries. Montana’s trademark was black and white pinto horses, every one of them named Rex. He and the “Rexes” rode in every Rose Bowl Parade dating back to 1932. Montana, born June 21, 1910, near West Point, Mont., said he was more fortunate than most performers. His trick roping, along with his horses, was his business, as well as his hobby. He died May 28, 1998.

He appeared in a number of John Wayne movies and made headlines in 1953 when he roped Pres Eisenhower as a gag during his inaugural parade. He asked the President's permission first, but Secret Service agents were unamused by the incident. Mr Montana was a fixture on the rodeo circuit in the USA and Canada and also appeared in more than 60 annual Tournament of Roses parades in Pasadena, California, waving to the crowd from a silver saddle.

The saddle that is exhibited is TBD...................



Other Pages of Collection:   GT Rowell
   Paisley
   Montie Montana
   Jack Wescott
   Gunsmoke
   Horse Head, Diamond Motif

Many of the magazines and newspapers we advertise in provide exceptional background stories
on Lone Pine, surrounding cities and the myriad of great things to do along Highway 395.


Check them out below!

Scenic 395 Annual Guide Magazine



Fall 2012, American Cowboy's 2012 Collector Editon
Magazine Available in our Museum Gift Shop
American_Cowboy_Musuem_Ad_rollover GeneralStorelink

Special Subscription Offer for Lone Pine Film Museum Members & Friends
              
Publisher to Donate $10.00 per subscription to Lone Pine Film History Museum          
      
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Ranch & Reata Magazine is the newest and most authentic journal ref!ecting and celebrating the art, culture, people and places that make the American West such a special place for people around the world. More than a place the West is a state of mind and away of living.

Ranch & Reata is a limited edition, fine printed publication as well as a fully interactive online magazine. Both presentations offer content to savored. Stories and features are long form as Ranch & Reata is a “Journal” format, meaning is limited advertising. It is a format that benefits the advertiser with an uncluttered environment and benefits the reader with more to READ. Articles focus on the interesting people, places, ways and culture of the West – from some of the West’s best writers and all under the seasoned and talented eye of editor A.J. Mangum. Stories are authentic, insightful and memorable.

 

Ranch & Reata features the finest of what’s new in the west and celebrates the art and crafts of this unique place, expressing the root-based horse and cow culture that exemplifies the American West. Love western photography, R&R features extensive portfolios on the works of the West’s greatest living and historic photographers along with stories on all aspects of western culture, art and music.

On its debut in 2011, Ranch & Reata, the Journal of the American West, became one of the most acclaimed magazines in the cowboy culture. Since its launch, it's built upon that acclaim, earning the prestigious General Excellence award from American Horse Publications and providing readers with well-written, insightful and beautifully designed editorial content, all centered on the contemporary Western lifestyle.

Click Here for Special Offer
One Year Subscription
Six Issues (Bi-Monthly)
$63.00
Print Version
On-Line Version
& Ranch & Reata Radio

Highlights from the December 2012/January 2013 issue:

  • An Untold Story in the History of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show
  • Rawhide Braider Whit Olson
  • Wyoming Artist Chessney Sevier
  • Western furniture designer Steve Moulton
  • An Excerpt from Mustang Spring, by Deanna Dickinson McCall
  • Texas Horseman Buster McLaury
  • Essays by Tom Russell & Buck Brannaman
  • Ranch Photography by Kathy McCraine
  • The best in cowboy cooking, apparel, tack & decor

 
Subscribe to Ranch & Reata today, and complete your holiday shopping with gift subscriptions for all the Westerners in your life. 

 

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BONUS: Ranch & Reata Radio
     Listen_Now


On the Internet since 2004, and in over 100 countries and all 50 states, Range Radio is simply...the voice of the west. No other radio station delivers such a diverse blend of music genres. We hope you enjoy Range Radio, we look forward to your comments and we hope you tell your friends about our exclusive radio format.  Please saddle up and come along on the ride...Bruce_Pollock

 

Range Radio Café is a weekly radio show, hosted by Bruce Pollock, voted DJ of the Year-2011 by the Academy of Western Music Artists and the founder of Range Radio. The Range Radio Café is a LIVE radio show broadcast from The Ranch & Reata Roadhouse studios in downtown Santa Ynez, California.  Every Saturday from 9 AM to 12 Noon (PST), Bruce hosts intriguing local celebrities and guests, singer-songwriters, artisan craftsmen and a crackle-barrel of characters and artists that perform at the Roadhouse and featured daily on Range Radio around the world. With over 82,000 Facebook fans, listening in all states and over 100 countries the best of the West comes alive each hour. Classic Country, Real Cowboy and Western music blends with weekly themes to spark the the imagination and touch the Western Spirit in all of us.

More than the best in Western & Cowboy music, Bruce captures the thoughts and opinions of a world wide audience intrigued with the West, the values of the West and real people who live, believe and practice The Cowboy Way of life. Listen each week as we invite and ask you to relive the American West with us. It's The Cowboy Way.

Android Android App: Click Here

Apple_App Apple App:

 

If your in the Santa Ynez area - check out their new restaurant:

Ranch__Reata_Roadhouse

IT COULD NOT HAPPEN WITHOUT YOU!

It has been twenty-three years since community leaders fostered the first Lone Pine Film Festival, a weekend celebration to honor the rich history of film production that began in the region in the early 1920s. The Festival would not only pay tribute to our film heritage but also help define the community's broader long-term goals of expanding Lone Pine's economic growth through an increased pursual of film production for the area.   The Festival would also bring attention to the tourist potential for the town as the Gateway to Death Valley, the Eastern Sierra and, of course, as a portal to Mount Whitney.

The history of the Lone Pine Film Festival is a testament to the success of the annual event. A number of years ago a new vision began to take shape in the form of a museum that would illuminate and interpret the history of filming in the region by exhibiting props, costumes and film memorabilia, including posters and other collectibles. Also included would be an archive of materials to be used as a resource for research and education to further document film-making, past and present, in the Eastern Sierra. In 2006, that vision became a reality. Through the efforts of numerous community leaders, patrons and county allies, and with the generous financial support of Beverly and Jim Rogers, owners of Intermountain West Communications in Las Vegas, the land was acquired and the Lone Pine Film History Museum became a reality.

Your sponsorship and support of the Lone Pine Film Festival have provided a significant contribution to the realization of the Museum. Since it opened in 2006, we continue to see the Festival's influence in helping to build and expand a broad membership base. The Columbus Day weekend celebration and the Festival's popularity has been a stimulus for good press bringing visitors to the town throughout the year. Most importantly, the continued growth of the membership base forms the foundation that will become the basis for the Museums growth and the catalyst for expansion to continue our mission of honoring and archiving the heritage of Western films and film-making.

The Museum Board would like to thank all the sponsors for their support this year, as well as the festival’s and Museum’s staff, committees and volunteers for their continued dedication and work.

sponsorsAnisa2012

Lynn Bunn
Martin Powell
Ed Schuyler
Larry Turner
Dean & Bev Vanderwall
Margaret Warner
Tib Wilkerson

Monte & Cora Williams

Roll mouse over design to see Surprise!

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Click Here to Purchase

The Annual Lone Pine Short Film Festival
May 2 - May 5 2013

Inviting both filmmakers and the audience to experience their own relationship to the edge.

Welcoming narrative, documentary, animated and student films under 30 minutes in length.

We want films that startle the eye, filled with unique perceptions from the next generation, exploring the challenges of
modern life that seek social,political and economic connections that spread across the urban and rural landscape.

Click Below to register at withoutabox.
Lone_Pine_Short_Film_Festival_One_Sheet_2013

Celebrity Interviews 2009 with Cheryl Rogers-Barnett
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Author, Cheryl Rogers Barnett “Cowboy Princess” and “The All-American Cowboy Grill”, conducts one on one interviews with all the stars, at the 2009 Lone Pine Film Festival. The interviews have quickly become a favorite of festival goers and one of the most talked about events of the annual festival. (www.lonepinefilmfestival.org)  Cheryl the daughter of Lone Pine favorite Roy Rogers grew up in the movie industry and is close friends with many of the celebrities. Join with Cheryl and Lone Pine guests as you listen in on these intimate conversations .

Author, Cheryl Rogers Barnett “Cowboy Princess” and “The All-American Cowboy Grill”, conducts one on one interviews with all the stars, at the 2009 Lone Pine Film Festival. The interviews have quickly become a favorite of festival goers and one of the most talked about events of the annual festival. (www.lonepinefilmfestival.org)  Cheryl the daughter of Lone Pine favorite Roy Rogers grew up in the movie industry and is close friends with many of the celebrities. Join with Cheryl and Lone Pine guests in Statham Hall as you listen in on these intimate conversations .

 

A.C. Lyles
For 77 years, Lyles has been the quintessential company man, so much so that when the present head of the studio, Brad Grey took the reins of the company he asked Lyles to introduce him to the troops.

As a child in Jacksonville, Lyles handed out handbills for Paramount’s Florida Theater, before charming his way up to page. So excited by his new gig, he wrote his boss, Paramount’s founder Adolph Zukor, who eventually visited Florida, where he told the youth to “keep in touch.” Lyles took that to mean writing Zukor every Sunday for the next four years. When Zukor’s secretary told Lyles that letters every two months would be fine, he kept up the weekly letters and added the secretary to his correspondence list.

Lyles’ first trip to Hollywood was, ironically, on assignment for a Jacksonville newspaper to cover a 20th Century Fox star, Shirley Temple, with whom he remains friends to this day. Despite a meeting with Fox’s Darryl Zanuck initiated by Walter Winchell, Lyles went over to the Paramount lot, scoring a mailroom job and, at 19, was tapped to run the studio’s publicity department.

 

Ben Cooper
By the age of eight he was already involved in acting, with appearances on radio shows. In his teenage years he graduated to stage work. He put his experience to good use when attending Columbia University where he wrote a thesis on the subject of radio.

Cooper's earliest credited screen appearance was as an eighteen-year-old in 1952–1953 on the Armstrong Circle Theatre on NBC. He starred in 29 feature films, 18 were at Republic Pictures including JOHNNY GUITAR starring Joan Crawford.

Starting in 1959, Cooper began starring on dozens of television westerns; including the following shows shot on the Republic lot, "Wagon Train", "The Rifleman," "Gunsmoke," and "Rawhide."

Cooper also made many other television appearances, guest starring in over 50 series. He appeared on CBS’s "The Twilight Zone" created by Rod Serling and in five episodes of CBS’s legal drama "Perry Mason," CBS’s detective series "Mannix,"  ABC’s "Marcus Welby M.D." and from 1981 to 1983, Cooper had a recurring role on ABC's "The Fall Guy," starring Lee Majors.

Among Cooper's last television roles were as Mr. Parrish in two episodes of CBS's prime time hit series DALLAS and as a bureaucrat in the Dallas spinoff, KNOTS LANDING. He appeared as J. Howard Tucker in the episode "Gibbon Take" of the NBC legal drama LA LAW and Sheriff Dowd on KUNG FU: THE LEGEND CONTINUES.

Cooper's last film roles were in LIGHTNING JACK (1994) and in the two documentaries, JOAN CRAWFORD: ALWAYS A STAR and JOAN CRAWFORD: THE ULTIMATE MOVIE STAR.

 

Denny Miller
In his words ... "Once Upon a Dime... Remember when going to the movies was a dime. I do. All that magic for 10 cents. The movies in Bourbon, Indiana, where I spent my first 16 summers, were shown on the white washed outside wall of the hardware store. Bring your own chair and if it rains you have to wait till next Saturday night. Movies were a real treat and they still are but I never dreamed of being a cowboy or an actor or a space cadet. Basketball filled my dreams. Athletes were my heroes.

First Bloomington, Indiana was home, then Silver Springs, Maryland, then Baldwin, Long Island, New York and then Los Angeles with Mom and Professor Dad and younger brother Kent. My wife Nancy and I have lived in Las Vegas, NV, since 2002.


At UCLA I was studying to be a coach, basketball or football. Then a very HAPPY ACCIDENT happened. I was working at a summer job moving furniture. While loading a truck with office furniture in Hollywood, I heard a voice yell "Hey you!" "Me?" I said to the guy leaning out the window of his car that was stopped by the curb. "Yes" he said. "Come here and let me see your hair line."

I was sure I didn't hear what I thought I'd heard so I put down the chair I was taking to the truck and went over to the fella. "Let me see your hair line." he repeated. I thought the guy was loony tunes so I brushed the hair out of my face, said "How's that?" and turned to go back to work. Over my shoulder I heard, "Here's my card, call me at my office." I took the card and he drove off. The card said "Talent Agent."

I showed the card to my boss who said "Just load the furniture!" We did and took it to, and I'm not making this up, a Hollywood Agency. While moving the desks and chairs into the offices three more agents gave me their cards. Nothing like this had happened to me before and it hasn't happened again.

Like I said A HAPPY ACCIDENT. Who said "Life is what happens to you while you're on your way to do something else." I called the first Agent that had given me his card and that led to an interview at Review Studios and that to a screen test.

The screen test was of the "personality" variety. That means you don't have to know how to act. Just stand or sit in front of the camera and answer questions like ---"What is your name?" "Where do you live?" What do you do?" Real tough test. I didn't forget my name so I got a 7 year contract as a studio contract player. Bye bye basketball!

Lucky? You bet! Luck got me another screen test. This one was a scene from the play Voice of the Turtle. The test was directed by Oscar winning director, George Cukor. The contract that resulted was for that of a studio contract player for MGM. That led to the role of Tarzan. Thank you Mr. Cukor.    Good luck, a good agent and good health have been with me ever since."

 

Diamond Farnsworth
An active stunt coordinator, Diamond Farnsworth is an accomplished stuntman, serving as stunt coordinator on the show NCIS, and before that working on Jag and Quantum Leap. Diamond is the son of famous stuntman and actor Richard Farnsworth and began his stunt career in 1968. He has been serving as a stunt coordinator since 1980. He began with Paint Your Wagon and was stunt double for Sylvester Stallone in First Blood, Rambo and Rhinestone. He has also doubled Kevin Costner, Dennis Quid and Jeff Bridges. He has loaned to the museum his father’s “Ken Maynard chaps,” given to Richard by the famous western star.

 

Dick Jones
American actor who achieved some success as a child and as a young adult, especially in B-Westerns and in television. The son of a Texas newspaper editor, Jones was a prodigious horseman from infancy, billed at the age of four as the World's Youngest Trick Rider and Trick Roper. At the age of six, he was hired to perform riding and lariat tricks in the rodeo owned by western star Hoot Gibson. Gibson convinced young Jones and his parents that there was a place for him in Hollywood, and the boy and his mother went west. Gibson arranged for some small parts for the boy, whose good looks, energy, and pleasant voice quickly landed him more and bigger parts, both in low-budget Westerns and in more substantial productions.

In 1940, he had one of his most prominent (although invisible) roles, as the voice of Pinocchio (1940) in Walt Disney's animated film of the same name. Jones attended Hollywood High School and, at 15, took over the role of Henry Aldrich on the hit radio show "The Aldrich Family." He learned carpentry and augmented his income with jobs in that field. He served in the Army in Alaska during the final months of World War II. Gene Autry, who before the war had cast Jones in several Westerns, put him back to work in films and particularly in television, on programs produced by Autry's company. Now billed as Dick Jones, the handsome young man starred as Dick West, sidekick to the Western hero known as "The Range Rider" (1951), in a TV series that ran for 76 episodes in 1951 (and for decades in syndication). Then Autry gave Jones his own series, "Buffalo Bill, Jr." (1955)', which ran for 40 episodes. Jones continued working in films throughout the 1950s, then retired and entered the business world.

 

Geri Jewell
Geri Jewell is best known as Cousin Geri on the NBC sitcom, "The Facts of Life".  She was the first person with a disability to have a regular role on a prime time series. She began her career doing stand up comedy at the Comedy Store in 1978. In 1980 she performed at the 2nd Annual Media Access Awards, when she was introduced to Norman Lear by producer, Fern Field.  After her ground breaking role on "Facts" she has appeared on such shows as "The Great Space Coaster", the Emmy award winning movie "Two of a Kind, "Sesame Street," "Jump Street," "Young and the Restless," "Strong Medicine" and the HBO hit series, "Deadwood."

When Geri is not working in television, she is a highly sought after motivational speaker and trainer in the areas of disability and diversity. She has consulted for such companies as Hewlett Packard, Master Foods, Johnson Wax, AT&T, and Amgen. She has also trained such government agencies as The C.I.A., The U.S. Treasury Department, Defense Intelligence Agency, and the U.S. Army.  She is famous for her uncanny ability to captivate the hearts of her audiences by using humor to facilitate attitudinal change. Geri brings to her presentations her personal experiences in life, which in turn allow people to gain insight into the prospect of seeing disability in a totally different light, creating hope where there is none, and joy where there is pain.

In addition to her ongoing speaking circuits, she has never forgotten her roots in comedy. She has appeared on many of the cable comedy shows, including Evening at the Improv on A&E, and Stand Up Spotlight on VHI. She has opened for Paul Anka, Robert Goulet, and Judy Collins. She has been featured on Entertainment Tonight, E Hollywood True Story, and ABC's 20/20.

She is co-staring in a new independent film,"Night of the White Pants" released in 2008. All in all, Geri is enjoying a thriving career. She has been the recipient of many awards, including the 1992 Founders Award, the 2005 Independent Living Legacy Award, and the 2006 Victory award.


Hugh O'Brien
Born on April 19, 1923 (some references list 1925), in Rochester, New York, actor Hugh O'Brian had the term "beefcake" written about him during his nascent film years in the early 1950s, but he chose to avoid the obvious typecast as he set up his career. He first attended school at New Trier High School in Winnetka, Illinois, then Kemper Military School in Booneville, Missouri. Moving from place to place growing up, he managed to show off his athletic prowess quite early. By the time he graduated from high school, he had lettered in football, basketball, wrestling and track. Originally pursuing law, he dropped out of the University of Cincinnati in 1942 (age 19) and enlisted in the Marine Corps. Upon his discharge he ended up in Los Angeles.

Hugh joined a little theater group and a Santa Barbara stock company where he developed his acting chops and slowly built up his résumé. He was discovered for TV by director/actress Ida Lupino which opened the door to his signing with Universal Studios for films. Hugh's gentlemanly ruggedness, similar to a James Garner or a Gene Barry, was ideal for pictures, and his lean physique and exceptionally photographic mug had the modest, brown-eyed, curly-haired looker plastered all over the movie magazines. He rebelled against the image for the most part and, as a result, his years with Universal were not as fruitful as they could have been. For the duration, he was pretty much confined as a secondary player to standard action pictures such as Red Ball Express (1952), Son of Ali Baba (1952) and Seminole (1953). It was Rock Hudson who earned all of the Universal glamour guy roles and the out-and-out stardom that could easily have been Hugh's.

In 1954, he left Universal to freelance but did not fare any better until offered the starring role in "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955) on TV, a year later. It became a mainstay hit and Hugh an "overnight" star. During his six-year run on the western classic, he managed to show off his singing talents on variety shows and appeared on Broadway. The handsome bachelor remained a durable talent throughout the 60s and 70s with plentiful work on the summer stock stage and on TV, including the series "Search" (1972), but never got the one role to earn the critical attention he merited.

A sports enthusiast, his hobbies have included sailing, tennis, swimming and long-distance bicycling and his many philanthropic efforts have not gone unrecognized. His proudest achievement is the Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership (HOBY), which he founded in 1958 after spending considerable time with Dr. Albert Schweitzer and his clinic in Africa. Struck by the impassioned work being done by Schweitzer, O'Brian set up his own program to help develop young people into future leaders. O'Brian has since been awarded honorary degrees by several prestigious institutions of higher learning. The perennial bachelor finally "settled down" and tied the knot at age 81 with long-time companion Virginia Barber who is close to three decades his junior. They live in his Benedict Canyon home. He is at this time working on an autobiography.
 

Loren Janes
In 1954, Loren became a professional movie and television stuntman and stunt coordinator, making his debut in movies with an eighty-foot dive off a cliff on Catalina Island in an Esther Williams movie. In the following years, he worked with practically every major director, producer, and star in the industry, including doubling for Steve McQueen his entire 23-year career, Jack Nicholson, Kirk Douglas, Paul Newman, Michael Douglas, Charles Bronson, Robert Wagner, Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis, Yul Brunner, and Frank Sinatra. He has appeared in more than 500 movies and in over 2,200 television shows.

Loren feels fortunate that in his long career he has never been seriously injured. In fact, he has never broken a bone. He gives credit for this to his coaches for teaching him discipline and focus, his acrobatic background, staying in good shape, never smoking, drinking, or using drugs, and his faith in God.


In 1961, he was co-founder of the Stuntmen's Association of Motion Pictures and Television, the original Stuntmen's organization.  In 1992, he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), and was the National Chair of the SAG Stunt and Safety Committee. In August 2001, Loren received the coveted life time achievement award, the Golden Boot (the Oscar for Westerns). In April 2003, Loren received the “Galler

 

Paul Picerni
As a child Paul Picerni had aspirations to become an attorney until he acted in an eighth-grade play and later learned that the school principal liked his performance and called him "a born actor". He next appeared in little theater productions, then (after World War II Air Force service) on the stage at Loyola University. Picerni was acting in a play in Hollywood when he was spotted by Solly V. Bianco, head of talent at Warner Brothers; brought to the studio, the young actor was given a role in Breakthrough (1950). This WWII actioner turned out to be aptly named, as it led to a Warners contract for Picerni and a long succession of roles at that studio. Best-known for his second-banana role on the TV classic "The Untouchables" (1959) with Robert Stack, Picerni is the father of eight and grandfather of ten.


Peggy Stewart
Florida-born Peggy O'Rourke's parents divorced when she was very young. Peggy's mother eventually married a wealthy attorney named Stewart, and Peggy took his name. She grew up in Atlanta (where she developed the athletic skills she would later demonstrate in her many westerns for Republic Pictures).

On a family vacation to Los Angeles to visit her grandmother, Peggy, as a lark, attended classes at a dramatic school, but the acting bug hit her hard and when it was time to return to Atlanta, Peggy talked her mother into letting her staying with her grandmother. As luck would have it, a resident of the apartment building they lived in was character actor Henry O'Neill, who took a liking to Peggy and got her cast in her first film, Wells Fargo (1937).

She picked up a few more small roles, and acquitted herself so well the parts started getting bigger and she was working more often. She married actor Don 'Red' Barry in 1940, and was eventually signed by Republic Pictures, Barry's studio, to make westerns and serials. In three years, Peggy did almost 30 films at Republic, most of them westerns. She appeared in two of the studio's more successful serials, but when Republic assigned her to another one, she protested. She didn't particularly like working in serials, preferring the feature westerns, which didn't take as long to film. Eventually, the struggle with Republic got to the point where Peggy asked for her release, and she got it.

Although she wanted to start doing films other than westerns, she had made so many at Republic that she found herself basically unable to find work in any other genre. She freelanced for Monogram, Allied Artists, PRC and other small studios until she was picked up by Columbia--which immediately put her into serials.

She eventually decided to leave the film business, and did so in 1953. She did do some television work (mostly westerns!) while raising her family, and also performed in the Los Angeles theatrical community. She kept her hand in the film business, making occasional appearances in some lower-budget westerns, made-for-TV movies and inexpensive horror pictures.

 

Perry King
Perry King was born on April 30, 1948 in Alliance, Ohio.  He is the fourth of five children born to a physician; grandson of the famous literary editor Maxwell Perkins, and has ancestral ties to the Declaration of Independence.  Perry received a Bachelor of Arts degree in drama at Yale University and proceeded on to Julliard to study under John Houseman.  He's made over 50 films and made-for-television movies; including a few television series' and stage appearances; directed productions; contributed his voice as Han Solo in the National Public Radio's "Star Wars" series and participated in the CD-ROM game "Emergency Room". 

He is widely known for portraying 'Cody Allen' in the 1984 -1986 NBC Series Riptide; 'Hayley Armstrong' in the Fox series Melrose Place in 1995; 'Richard Williams' in the 2000 NBC Series Titans and most recently he played President Blake in 2004's The Day After Tomorrow.  In 1984 he was nominated for a Golden Globe award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion picture Made for Television for his performance in The Hasty Heart co-starring Gregory Harrison and Cheryl Ladd.  In 1997 King received a Robbie award for Best Actor for his performance in Doug Heyes, Jr.'s "Seven Out" at the Globe Playhouse in Los Angeles.

Perry married Karen Hryharrow, his college sweetheart, when he was 19 and had a daughter, Louise, on November 5, 1970.  Their marriage ended in 1980.  An avid motorcyclist with over 30 in his collection, he met Jamison [Jamie] Elvidge, an avid motorcyclist in her own right and one-time editor of the motorcycle magazine, American Woman Road Riding.  On June 9, 1990 they were married and in February 1992, daughter Hannah was born. The couple have since divorced.  He also enjoys auto racing and has competed in several celebrity/charity events. 

Perry has participated with the annual 'Love Ride' and 'Ride for Kids' in Los Angeles; on the Advisory Board at the American Academy where his most enjoyable work is unofficial coaching of students; is the national spokesperson for the Olive Crest Homes for Abused Children in Orange County, California, and remains  involved with that particular charity for over 20 years.  Perry also enjoys auto racing and has competed in several celebrity and charity races over the years. In 2004 he was the national spokesperson for the Virginia Museum of Transportation.

Perry is 'dad' first and foremost.  Daughter Louise, born in 1970, is a graduate cum laude with a juris doctorate and is presently finishing her medical residency. In February 2005 Louise gave birth to daughter Kate, making Perry a grandfather at 57.  Youngest daughter Hannah is Ivy League bound and is presently attending school in California.

Perry’s favorite times are spent exploring Death Valley and working on his 500+ acre ranch in northern California, which he purchased around the time he portrayed Clint Brannan in Family Channel’s 1998 television film, ‘The Cowboy and the Movie Star’.  In his own words, “I loved the character so much I decided to become him.”  He doesn’t like to talk about himself, watch his own work and doesn't like to dwell in the past.  He'd much rather  “look forward and up, if that makes sense.” 

More than thirty years after his debut in The Possession of Joel Delaney, Perry King is still performing a multitude of different roles for television and film and sums up his career as an actor in this manner:  "Even if I never work again I'm one of the luckiest actors who's ever lived."

 

Stella Stevens
A native of Hot Coffee, Mississippi, Stella Stevens was married at 15, a mother at 16 and divorced at 17. While attending Memphis State College, Stella became interested in acting and modeling. Her film debut was a bit part in Say One for Me (1959), but her appearance in Li'l Abner (1959) as Appassionata Von Climax is the one that got her noticed. Then her centerfold spread in Playboy was one of the most popular issues. She co-starred with some of the biggest names in movies such as Bobby Darin in Too Late Blues (1961); Elvis Presley in Girls! Girls! Girls! (1962); Glenn Ford in The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963); Jerry Lewis in The Nutty Professor (1963); and Dean Martin in The Silencers (1966). She appeared on the television series "Surfside 6" (1960); "Ben Casey" (1961) and the soap opera "General Hospital" (1963).

By the late 1960s, her career had leveled off and she was appearing in roles based on her looks. One of her best performances at that time was in the movie The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970), where she played Hildy, and showed that her talent was more than physical. But then she appeared in a poor offering like Slaughter (1972). In the 1970s and 1980s, Stella became a fixture in movies made for television and appeared in a number of television series. Her big screen career may have slowed during that time, but she has appeared in a number of movies in every decade since she debuted.

William Wellman
Rangy, sturdy-looking actor William Wellman Jr., was born in Los Angeles on January 20, 1937, one of seven children born to legendary director William A. Wellman and his fourth wife, one-time actress Dorothy Coonan Wellman, who appeared in a few of her husband's pictures. Bill Jr. spent most of his childhood surrounded by Hollywood celebrity. He got the fresh taste of a film set as a youngster when he appeared unbilled in a couple of his father's features. Following graduation, he attended Duke University but eventually abandoned that direction for a career in the movies.

Starting off in featured parts in the war pictures Lafayette Escadrille (1958) and Darby's Rangers (1958), both of which directed by his father, Bill Jr. found other work on his own in less quality films. Some of the teen exploitation he found himself in have since attained cult status, including High School Confidential! (1958), Macumba Love (1960) and College Confidential (1960). "Billy Jack" director Tom Laughlin also began using Bill prominently in his early work such as Like Father, Like Son (1965) [The Young Sinner] and The Born Losers (1967). In sparser times he managed to find some unbilled bits in several of Jerry Lewis's film slapstick of the 1960s, and fell in with the party crowd in A Swingin' Affair (1963), Winter A-Go-Go (1965) and A Swingin' Summer (1965). His TV career kicked in as the 1960s approached with a number of rugged guest roles on such established westerns as "Have Gun, Will Travel," "Rawhide," "Laramie" and "Gunsmoke."

In later years, Bill found work in a few more cult classics, including Black Caesar (1973), It's Alive (1974), and Laughlin's "Billy Jack" sequels. Establishing himself as a solid character actor, he took the lead in the apocalypse thrillers Image of the Beast (1980) and The Prodigal Planet (1983), the latter featuring daughter Cathy Wellman. While the quality of a number of his films over the years are certainly suspect, Bill has managed longevity and durability in a very difficult business. Moreover, he is credited with nearly 200 movies and television shows, 17 stage productions and some 200 commercial and industrial films. In addition to his acting work, his nearly 50-year career includes writing and producing efforts. He has occasionally appeared as a guest lecturer and has been active at autograph conventions. Of his many siblings, sister Cissy Wellman has also established herself on stage, film and TV.



Preview Lone Pine In the Movies: Celebrating the Centennials (2012)

 
Preview Lone Pine In the Movies: Roy Rogers (2011)


Preview Lone Pine In the Movies: Republic Pictures (2010)


Preview Lone Pine In the Movies:Daredevils of the West (2009)

 

Award Winning Quilt - “E. I. E. I. O.” 

WINNER
Congratulations to:

Jo Gledhill


E I E I O

Willl be Raffled Off at the
2016 Lone Pine Film Festival!

Fundraising Event for the 
Museum of Western Film History

The Museum of Western Film History, known for it's annual "Quilt Raffle" is pleased to announce this years Quilt - E I E I O.   Bonnie Keller's Award Winning Quilt Design, Ms. MacDonald's Farm ( E I E I O), has won many awards and is featured on many national quilting websites. The finished "Country Looking" Quilt is 82" x 86" with bright color farm animals using interesting fabrics and features incorporating 12 major patterns of favorite farm animals enjoying life on the farm.

The Quilt panels were made by Linda Kimball and machine quilted by Sue Handley, of Palmdale, California. The Quilt won 1st place award and a people's choice award at the 2015 Antelope Valley based, Tri - County Fair in Lancaster, California. 

The quilt will be raffled at the campfire on the last day of the 2016 Lone Pine Film Festival October 7th, 8th and 9th. Proceeds from the Quilt will benefit the Museum of Western Film History Acquisition fund.

Tickets are $1.00 per ticket or 6 for $5.00 and can be purchased at the Museum or you can call and purchase over the phone. Tickets will be mailed to you.

CLICK ON PICTURE
FOR LARGER IMAGE
E I E I O


To order over the telephone, call the Museum Gift Shop 760-876-9909.

Hours for the gift shop are: Monday - Wednesday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Thursday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Sunday 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Winner does not need to be present at drawing. For those buying over the telephone please make sure you provide e-mail and phone number.

The mission of the Museum of Western Film History is to collect, preserve, protect, archive and exhibit a variety of original materials containing information of permanent historical value relating to the history and heritage of the American Western Film for the preservation, education and enrichment of the public. The Museum actively pursues collections of personal papers, business and organizational records, as well as memorabilia that reflect and document aspects of Western film history and popular culture for successive generations to discover.  Located on Highway 395 on the south end of town, the museum’s 10,000 square feet of exhibits, an eighty-five seat movie theater and gift shop offer visitors a unique experience helping to document and interpret the cultural heritage of America’s cinematic history through film programs, artifact preservation and exhibits.

However, the museum's largest exhibit is its “Back Lot” – The Alabama Hills, just to the west of town. Since the early 1920s, these rugged, rounded rock formations and meandering gullies have played a "starring role" as Hollywood’s Western backdrop for cowboy action thrillers featuring Hopalong Cassidy, Randolph Scott, Gene Autry, Tim Holt and Roy Rogers. William Shatner, Kevin Bacon and Robert Downey Jr. have all filmed in the shadow of Mount Whitney, the highest summit in the contiguous United States, in such films as Star Trek, Tremors, and Ironman. 

Come visit and enjoy a very unique film experience … and join us each Columbus Day weekend for our annual Lone Pine Film Festival honoring the heroes and heroines of the silver screen. Mingle with celebrity guests, visit the movie sites with the "back lot tours;" enjoy classic film screenings, a Sunday Cowboy Church service; and close the weekend with an old fashion “Main Street parade" and Sunday evening's campfire roundup in the park.

See - http://www.lonepinefilmfestival.org/

 

SOLD OUT  CONCERT   SOLD OUT

PLEASE CALL MUSEUM
(760) 876-9103

or Nan Gering (760) 561-5207 for Cancellations


Thank you for your support

 

 

SCHEDULE:

Shuttle bus starts at 5.00 from the museum.

Sit down dinner of Steak plus vegetarian option

Pay bar (wine, beer, sprits)

Water and soft drinks provided.

Concert commences at dusk

Return shuttle around 9.pm

after concert ends

CONCERT AND DINNER IN THE ALABAMA HILLS $80. (Shuttle bus from the museum start at 5.pm)

Dan Hicks will present his new musical revue Kollege of Musical Knowledge for one night only at Lone Pine's "Concert in the Rock" series in the Alabama Hills. This show is the latest in a series of Dan Hicks-created musical productions that have paid homage to the Singing Cowboys, saluted the Folk Years and honored Swing Noir. Dan now pays tribute to the composers and artists he most admires including Duke Ellington, Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan, Richard Rodgers, Paul Simon and, of course, himself!

“Professor” Hicks will illuminate eager pupils to some music history as well as a variety of musical styles backed by his School's Out Orchestra and the Whiz Kids Singers. Just listen and learn! And, don’t be surprised if Dan’s very own Lickettes drop by as well as some other special guests to join him on some of those signature Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks tunes.

Dan Hicks unique songwriting and blend of styles, masterful folk-swing guitar playing, and unmistakable sense of humor have made him a cultural icon, landing Hicks on the cover of Rolling Stone twice and provoking Tom Waits to say, “Dan Hicks is fly, sly, wily and dry” while Elvis Costello proclaimed him “an American treasure.” The LA Weekly said, “Dan Hicks has plowed deep furrows  through some of the most fertile pop music territory known to man, and during it all has maintained both his own distinct, light yet emphatic touch and a pace that's always kept him more than a few steps ahead of his colleagues.


At this years 22nd Annual Lone Pine Film Festival, The Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History, will be celebrating our hero Roy Rogers 100th Birthday by presenting “The Roy Rogers Round-Up and Rodeo”. Roy’s eldest daughter, Cheryl Rogers - Barnett and her husband Larry, will be co-hosting this museum event Oct. 7 – 9, and will be on hand to reminisce of the 'good ole days' right along with all of us 'young at heart cowboys and cowgirls’. We will be blowing out the candles on the birthday cake, kicking off the weekend with an exclusive “Museum Members Only” reception Thursday Oct. 6th at 6:00. (Free to Museum Members, not open to the general public)

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Community

Western festivals

Inyo County Film Office

chris-enss083.jpgMarch 08, 2010: This coming Saturday evening Author Chris Enss will present a program on the images of women of the West in film and in real life, kicking-off the Lone Pine Film History Museum’s part of the “Celebrating Women of Eastern California” exhibit organized through the Eastern Sierra Cultural and Heritage Alliance (ESCHA).

The exhibit is actually distributed throughout the area from the Maturango Museum in Ridgecrest to the museums in the snow (whose exhibits will open later in the spring.) ESCHA has involved most of the local museums and interpretive centers in the project. To see the entire exhibit you need to visit all of the participating institutions. The exhibit will be on display through the fall and will have many events and speakers associated with the theme during that time.
The Lone Pine event starts at 6:30 with a “meet and greet” period with liquid refreshments. At 7:00 pm, Chris Enss will do her presentation with slides in the Wild West Theater. Afterwards she will answer questions and sign some of her books that will be on sale in the Museum Gift Shop. The event and refreshments are free.

Enss is an award-winning screenwriter who has written for television, short subject & feature films, and standup comedians. She is the author of “Hearts West: True Stories of Mail Order Brides on the Frontier;” “How the West Was Worn: Bustles and Buckskins on the Wild Frontier;” and “Buffalo Gals: Women of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show”. Two of her books about Roy Rogers and Dale Evans: “The Cowboy and the Senorita” and “Happy Trails,” were co-authored with film producer Howard Kazanjian.

Some other titles by Enss show the diversity of her subjects and the diversity of the role of women in the settling of the west, a partnership often overlooked in the B westerns of the 1930’s and 1940’s. Many films in this genre were shot locally. Her titles in women’s history in the West include: “Buffalo Gals: Women of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show;” “Gilded Girls: Women Entertainers of the Old West;” “Hearts West: True Stories of Mail-Order;” “Love Untamed: Romances of the Old West;” “Pistol Packin' Madams: True Stories of Notorious Women of the Old West;’ “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon: Women Soldiers and Patriots of the Western Frontier;” and “The Doctor Wore Petticoats: Women Physicians of the Old West” among others.

oakley_davis.jpgThe Museum’s exhibit is subtitled “Women of the Reel/Real West” and explores the images of women in westerns made here and compares these images with real women who lived and worked in our area. Some of the local pioneer women will be familiar to locals.

“Western films until after World War 2 reduced women to several stereotypical roles in films. They were often ‘set decoration’ looking beautiful but with little real things to do,” explained Chris Langley, the Museum film historian.
Occasionally women were ranch owners, usually left a ranch by a dead brother or father, and usually unable to actually take charge or protect the herds. That’s when the hero would ride in and save the day. We see clearly in the images of the women of our area that they were not so much ‘cowgirls’ but instead equal partners with their husbands. Not only did they work alongside them, especially during busy times of year, but they cooked, gardened, raised the kids and also did many handicrafts like quilting. Although women in the West started to gain the vote before it was won on the national stage, they worked as hard or harder than men with few of their rights guaranteed.”

The exhibit explores these facts in terms of images both on and off the screen. It is really only in the last forty years that feminist western historians have fully explored the role of women in settling the West. “With Annie Oakley played by Gail Davis and Dale Evans on the Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Show on television in the 1950’s that girls in the audience were given consistently competent and powerful images on women on the western Frontier in films and popular media,” Langley concluded.
The exhibit will be on display during the summer and fall.

March 02, 2010:

By Chris Langley, Executive Director, Lone Pine Film History Museum

            A visiting exhibit at the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History examines the film careers of three cousins: Cactus Mack, Glenn Strange, and Rex Allen. While Rex Allen has the more familiar and recognizable name of the three, Mack and Strange may actually have been seen more frequently by many western fans. Consequently, their faces may be more recognizable, while their names remain unknown. They often played henchmen, bad guys and villains, but frequently in the background or as a member of a gang.
            Julie Ann Ream created the exhibit at the Museum and she is a granddaughter to Cactus Mack. All three actors were cousins and from time to time actually worked with one or more of the other cousins. The exhibit has many photos, letters, memorabilia and costumes from their careers.
            Cactus Mack’s life in some ways is wrapped in some mystery. First of all, Cactus Mack was his stage name. His real name was probably Taylor Curtus McPeters, born on August 8, 1899 in Weed, New Mexico. All three cousins had musical talent and Cactus Mack and cousin Glenn joined a group of singing cowboys who eventually took the name “Arizona Wranglers.” Cactus Mack and his fellow musician began by supplying music for various low budget oaters in the 1930’s, playing the role of the cowboys sitting around the campfire, singing. This led to small roles in the films, frequently uncredited.            His filmography contains a list of seventeen movies with scenes made in Lone Pine. Early films made locally with Cactus Mack include I Cover the War (1937) with John Wayne; Where the Buffalo Roam (1938) with Tex Ritter; Saga of Death Valley (1939) with Roy Rogers; and In Old Monterey (1939) with Gene Autry. The exhibit contains many pictures of Cactus Mack with his musical groups, with cousin Glenn Strange in Hoot Gibson’s Rodeo and a letter from “a lonesome cowboy” signed by Mack.
            The second actor featured in the exhibit is Glenn Strange who, although he appeared in nearly 300 westerns, is probably best remembered as the Universal Frankenstein monster and the bartender in television’s long-running series Gunsmoke.
Glenn Strange appeared in fully twenty-five films with scenes made in and around Lone Pine and Inyo County.
            Records indicate Strange was also born in Weed, New Mexico in August, 1899, a few days after cousin Cactus Mack. Glenn Strange was of Cherokee Indian and Irish descent and actually grew up in Cross Cut, Texas where he learned “cowboying” skills. His musical experience grew when he teamed up with his cousin, and by the late 30’s his casting began to get better and better. However, his real fame rests on a day when he was working at Universal when make-up artist Jack Peirce (often spelled Pierce) noticed him and offered to pay him $25 to stay after. It was then that he made up Strange in the classic Universal Frankenstein make-up made famous by Boris Karloff.
            Strange’s size, over six feet five, worked perfectly with his facial features and he “became” the famous film monster.   Karloff had grown tired of playing the same character, and was also afraid he would become stereotyped. So he gladly let Strange assume the role for several films with the famous monster. In fact, Karloff played opposite Strange once.   
            When making westerns became rarer and rarer, Glenn Strange moved over to television where he assumed the role of Sam the bartender in “Gunsmoke” and worked in that series for twelve years until shortly before his death from lung cancer in 1973. The Film Museum exhibit has many pictures of Strange in his various western roles, but of most interest are the full size model of his Frankenstein make-up, as well as several pictures of him preparing for the role. 
            Finally, the exhibit features Rex Allen, credited with being the last of the popular breed of singing cowboys that dominated the screen for several decades. He has said, “My dad was a fiddle player. He used to play for all the dances and stuff, and I learned to play guitar when there was nobody to accompany him. And then I sang in all the church choirs and glee clubs in school. Basically, all I ever wanted to do was try to be a singer and make a living at that. And then, went into radio and the recording field, and had a few hits.” When Roy Rogers left Republic to go into television, Rex Allen was a natural replacement.
            Allen was born in Wilcox, Arizona in 1920 where the museum that celebrates his life and career is found today. After high school, he spent two years cowboying but had gotten tired of picking himself up off the ground. His sense of humor is caught in his famous remark about this period. “Yeah, I rode bulls and buckin’ horses for about two years when I first got out of high school, but I got tired of pickin’ myself up off the arena floor, and I found that a guitar never kicked me, never hurt me a bit, so I decided I better stick with that.” In his movie career he became known as “The Arizona Cowboy,” the title of his first starring role for Republic.
            He didn’t want to be accused of copying the famous cowboys that had preceded him so he wore his guns butt forward, had a dark brown horse name Koko. When he finished with nineteen films, the singing cowboy was also finished so Rex migrated to television to do a series called “Frontier Doctor.” His costume from that series, while not in the exhibit per se, is exhibited right next to it, permanently in the museum, a gift from Jim Rogers. Allen also developed a voice-over career narrating several Disney true-life adventures as well as doing other commercial work.
            Rex Allen performed at the Lone Pine Film Festival in one of the earliest Friday night concerts, a feat that was duplicated by his son, Rex Allen Jr. several years later. Rex Allen died tragically on December 17, 1999 in Tucson, run over by his caretaker’s car after suffering a heart attack.
            The Cactus Mack, Glenn Strange, Rex Allen Exhibit is rich in diverse film career history and worth a visit. The Museum is open everyday from 10 am. 

January 02, 2010:

COMMUNITY READS FILM SERIES STARTS JANUARY 20TH, 2010 AT 7:00 PMjill_kinmont_boothe.jpg
 
The Museum is participating again this year in the Inyo County Superintendent of School's, 2nd Annual Community Reads program. This year’s book to read is “The Other Side of the Mountain”, by Evans G. Valens. Join us here in the “Wild West Theater” for the following:
 
January 20th, 7:00 pm – “The Other Side of the Mountain” the movie.
January 27th, 7:00 pm – “Mammoth Dreams – The Story of Dave McCoy” This documentary film of the founder of Mammoth Mountain.
February 3rd, 7:00 pm – “Tracks of Passion” with author Robin Morning Slideshow and talk of the history of skiing in Inyo and Mono.
February 10th, 7:00 pm – “White Ecstasy” Watch this Austrian movie about skiing in the 30’s with breathtaking jumps and tricks. This movie is a piece of history

lesley-selander.jpg

September 12, 2009:

For the next five months, as the featured Friday night movie, the Lone Pine Film History Museum will be showing a retrospective collection of films by western director Lesley Selander, all made locally in Lone Pine or Death Valley. Selander served as a prolific series director for both William Boyd playing Hopalong Cassidy, and Tim Holt. Undoubtedly, the quality of these films are partially because of the talents of Selander.
Lesley Selander was born in Los Angeles on May 26, 1900 and he had already gotten into the film business by the age of sixteen. Film historian Harry Sanford quotes Les, speaking about his work at the Harold Bell Wright Lab, “We’ get the films wet out of the tub, and drop them over wooden racks. Smelled like hell, but it was a job, and I was glad to get it.” It could also be called paying your dues.
Long before he was to actually go on location to Lone Pine, Selander had a connection with the area. He was looking for a new job. “A friend gave me a tip that they were looking for help on a new Will Rogers film, DOUBLING FOR ROMEO (1922), and I hot-footed it over to the studio. The job turned out to be an assistant cameraman.” The connect ion with Lone Pine was that part time resident Clarence Badger was directing and, of course, Rogers vacationed in Lone Pine and worked in the Owens Valley.
 
 
By 1925 he had worked himself up to an assistant director position on a Buck Jones feature, DURAND OF THE BADLANDS, that filmed in Lone Pine. Unfortunately, the film is considered lost at this time and is not available for the film series.
Les credits his friendship with Woody Van Dyke for his success. “My first job for him was as a cameraman on a serial. We did everything in those days, you know; it wasn’t at all like it is now. I did seven pictures with a producer named Neal Hart. They were all Westerns. I was the cameraman. I remember we even shot one in Mexico.”
Les describes Buck working on DURAND. “Buck was the greatest rider I ever saw.He was so good, in fact, that you could not shoot too close on tracking shots because he was so smooth in the saddle that it would look like he was on a prop horse against a process screen.”

Les followed Van Dyke over to MGM to work, then he was loaned out to Warner. When he came back to Metro, Woody told himBuck Jones was returning there to make westerns and needed a unit director. Les Selander got the job because Jones was already familiar with him, and Buck’s fifth film in the series was SANDFLOW (1937) and it was made on location in Lone Pine. The film series begins with this picture.

Les had been friends with William Boyd for years and Boyd introduced him to the Hopalong Cassidy series producer Harry Sherman. Les’s perception of Boyd was that he was an unusual person, especially to be a cowboy hero. “He hated kids. He dislikes horses. He was convinced all that he had to do to retain his popularity was smile into the camera or make use of his enchanting laugh.” There are stories in Lone Pine that Boyd was out his costume and in the café as soon as possible and, on more than one occasion, had to switch his drink with a glass of milk if a youngster happened by outside.

lesley-selander-and-rocky-lane.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Les made many Hopalong Cassidy features, often among the best according to critics and audiences a like. Sherman did not get along well with Boyd but the series was making money, so he let it all be, But he was interested in branching out and used Selander on one of these films. It did well.
In 1938 the company made six Hoppies, as was expected. Selander made many Hopalong Cassidy films during this part of his career and the ones made in Lone Pine include HOPALONG RIDES AGAIN (1937); HEART OF ARIZONA(1938); PRIDE OF THE WEST (1938); RENEGADE TRAIL (1939) THREE MEN FROM TEXAS (1940). Three films not in the series, but produced by Sherman and Directed by Selander in Lone Pine were KNIGHTS OF THE RANGE(1940) starring Russell Hayden; THE LIGHT OF WESTERN STARS(1940) with Victor Jory and THE ROUNDUP (1941) with Richard Dix. It was a remake of the first film actually made in Lone Pine that starred Roscoe Fatty Arbuckle. All of these films will be shown at the Friday retrospective.

Harry Sherman finally abandoned the Hoppy series in 1944, and William Boyd himself made 12 more. The Lone Pine pictures directed by Lesley Selander were: PIRATES ON HORSEBACK(1941); WIDE OPEN TOWN(1941); COLT COMRADES (1943); BAR 20(1943) and RIDERS OF THE DEADLINE(1943). Altogether, Lesley made twenty-nine Hoppy Features, four Zane Greys and seven other western features for Harry Sherman.

tim-holt-richard-martin.jpgSelander explained, “My contract with ‘Pop’ (Harry Sherman) ended. I was out on my own after nearly eight years. I had to find work and I started looking around.” Sherman almost got him a job directing BUFFALO BILL at Fox but the studio balked. He did get to be assistant director for William Wellman.

Eventually, Selander landed at Republic and worked actively with many of their western stars. It was there that he directed the serial JUNGLE RAIDERS here in Lone Pine. Why they came to Lone Pine and the Alabama Hills to shoot a jungle picture is anyone’s guess. Much of Selander’s work was done down at the river where at least their were lots of bushes and enough trees to seem like a jungle. They also brought four (probably artificial) palm trees that look rather sad out in the rocks.
Selander directed Gene Autry in two pictures. Selander summed up Autry. “Gene was a funny guy. Whenever he wasn’t before the camera, he’d be on the phone to his broker.” One time he heard Autry buying a radio station when he walked into his dressing room. Selander compared Autry to J.P. Morgan, but added, “When it came to his lines, he learned the wrong script.”Selander went on to join Monogram, which had renamed itself Allied Artists and directed PANHANDLE(1947) with Rod Cameron with scenes on location in Lone Pine. “We ran out of money. A really big budget ha, it cost $100,000 and we still tapped out near the end. We had Cameron, as gunfighter John Sands, killed during the final shoot-out in the rain. But the studio wanted a happy ending, so he lived and was seen walking out of town in the rain, singing ‘The Deacon Went Down to the Cellar to Pray’ at the fade.” So if you want to see a dead man singing, be sure to check out this film and its happy rewrite.

RKO contracted with Selander and he started making Tim Holt westerns, many of them of high caliber. Four in the series were made in Lone Pine. They are GUNS OF HATE(1948); INDIAN AGENT (1948); THE MYSTERIOUS DESPERADO (1949) and RIDER FROM TUCSON(1950). Working at United Artists, Selander directed WAR PAINT(1953) almost entirely in Death Valley.
Harry Sanders described the film as a “grim drama of taut suspense…and concerned itself with a cavalry detachment led by Robert Stack and menaced from within and without.” The Boxoffice critic praised the film, writing “The veteran hand of Lesley Selander shows in the able direction which packs in many vivid action panels and holds attention constantly and a basic purpose to the plot that further bulwarks the developing drama.”

Harry Sanders described the film as a “grim drama of taut suspense…and concerned itself with a cavalry detachment led by Robert Stack and menaced from within and without.” The Boxoffice critic praised the film, writing “The veteran hand of Lesley Selander shows in the able direction which packs in many vivid action panels and holds attention constantly and a basic purpose to the plot that further bulwarks the developing drama.”

Selander’s final Lone Pine film was WAR PARTY (1965) made for Twentieth Century-Fox. Selander made five more films, some for Museum Board of Directors member A.C. Lyles at Paramount, and then he retired, having completed a wonderful diverse and interesting career of filmmaking. He retired to a well-earned rest in 1968 and passed away on December 5, 1979 at the age of 79.

SCHEDULE OF FILMS:
THE LOCAL FILMS OF DIRECTOR LESLEY SELANDER


SEPTEMBER 18: THE LIGHT OF WESTERN STARS 1940 Victor Jory
SEPTEMBER 25: THREE MEN FROM TEXAS 1940 William Boyd
OCTOBER 2: THE ROUNDUP 1941 Richard Dix
OCTOBER 16: PIRATES ON HORSEBACK 1941 William Boyd
OCTOBER 23: WIDE OPEN TOWN 1941 William Boyd
OCTOBER 30: COLT COMRADES 1943 William Boyd
NOVEMBER 6: BAR 20 1943 William Boyd
NOVEMBER 13: RIDERS OF THE DEADLINE 1943 William Boyd
NOVEMBER 20: PANHANDLE 1948 Rod Cameron
NOVEMBER 27: GUNS OF HATE 1948 Tim Holt
DECEMBER 4: INDIAN AGENT 1948 Tim Holt
DECEMBER 11: THE MYSTERIOUS DESPERADO 1949 Tim Holt
**JUNGLE RAIDERS 1945 KANE RICHMOND Chapters shown during series.

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August 20, 2009:

Owens Valley residents have been “making history” since humans first appeared here, says historian and author Jane Wehrey, who will explore how ordinary people have helped create extraordinary pasts in Lone Pine, Manzanar, and other Eastern Sierra communities. A slide show will accompany the presentations hosted by the Friends of the Lone Pine Library at the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Film History on Tuesday, September 8 starting at 7:00 PM. Ms. Wehrey has written two books about the area and will be available to sign both. Voices From This Long Brown Land: Oral Recollections of Owens Valley Lives and Manzanar Pasts (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006), showcases recollections of local residents who’s history-making dates to the late 1800s. Manzanar (Images of America Series, Arcadia Publishing, 2008) traces the long history of that site in photographs.

Wehrey is an Owens Valley native and current resident of Independence. She attended schools in Independence and graduated from Lone Pine High School. Her family’s history in the valley dates to 1918, when her maternal grandparents came to the Manzanar fruit-growing community to operate the general store. Her father’s family presence in the valley began about the same time and has long been associated with Los Angeles Aqueduct history. With a BA in English from Occidental College and MA in Public History from CalState Fullerton, Wehrey has worked extensively as an editor and interviewer in the oral history field at CSUF’s Center For Oral and Public History. She has been a consultant, exhibit writer, and part-time ranger for the National Park Service at Manzanar.


doc-denning.jpgMarch 15, 2008:

The Death Valley 49ers recently donated the guitar of musician Max H. “Doc” Dennings to the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History. It is now on display at the entrance of the Museum next to the Gift Shop.

The guitar was donated to the 49ers by Steven and Cecilia Orcutt. Nan Gering formally donated it to Rob Barron, General Manager of the Museum, at the annual Installation dinner of the Lone Pine Chamber held at Boulder Creek RV Park in January.
The artwork on the guitar, nicknamed “Old Dinah” was painted by Artist William Rushing. The leather strap, also on display, was created by artist R.P. Kidd.

“Doc” began his music career after serving in WWII in 1946 when he was under contract with 4-Star records in Hollywood making about a dozen sides on 78 rpm records.
Doc met and played with “The Reinsmen” from 1977 to 1993, except for a few months in 1981 when he took a leave-of-absence from that group and toured with the “Sons of the Peioneers.” While a member of these musical groups, he performed and made friends with stars like Rex Allen, Sr., Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, Eddie Dean, Tex Williams, Ken “Festus” Curtis, and other western movie and music stars, including songwriter Bob Nolan and fiddler Hugh Farr, originally with the “Sons of the Pioneers.”
His musical talents include vocalist, singing any part in trio or quartets, the guitar, fiddle and bass on 25 albums and numerous singles on various record labels. These include Sierra, Warner Bros., 4-Star, Superior, Comstock, and on a recent taper made in 2005.

As a “Reinsmen” and as a solo act, Doc Denning happily shared his talents for 28 years with the Death Valley 49ers. A representative commented, “We enjoyed his song writing, melodious voice, ‘Painted Lady’, poems and music.”
Doc retired in 2004. He recently wrote “It’s Been a GREAT LIFE.”

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March 14, 2008:

The Alabama Hills Stewardship Group, which you have read about in this paper, was recently selected as a recipient of the Department of Interior’s Cooperative Conservation Award. This prestigious national award was given to twenty similar partnerships across the country.

Bill Dunkelberger, of the Bishop BLM, announced the award to the group at their last meeting. Representatives from the group will fly to Washington to receive the award from secretary of the Interior Kempthorne the week of April 22 and then attend to a two-day workshop during which the group will give a half an hour presentation on the Alabama Hills work.”
Attending from the Owens Valley, besides Dunkelberger will be Chris Langley and Kathleen New representing the community, Alabama Hills Steward Dave Kirk and a representative from the BLM in the area.

The partnership was selected “because they demonstrate professionalism, dedication, and skills exemplifying the Department of Interior’s commitment of service to the public. In addition, they demonstrated how partnership efforts can achieve results that benefit local communities through the use, enhancement, and enjoyment of natural resources in a responsible manner that promotes a healthy and dynamic economy.”

The partnership consists of several community organizations working with the BLM to protect and preserve the Alabama Hills in their semi-primitive state while allowing access. The guiding vision is contained in the Vision Statement, written by the group, and read aloud each meeting. The partners are Healthy Communities of Southern Inyo County, Inyo County, Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History, Inyo County Film Commission, Lone Pine Chamber of Commerce, Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Tribe, McDonald’s of Lone Pine, Bishop and Mammoth Lakes, City of Los Angeles department of Water and Power, Central California resource Advisory Committee, U.S. Bureau of Land Management and Bishop Field Office, U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

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Feburary 14, 2008:

The Alabama Hills arch will achieve national prominence thanks to a decision to use the image on a public lands pass.
The Lone Pine Chamber and Lone Pine Film History Museum have been notified by their Alabama Hills Stewardship partner, the Bishop Regional Office of the BLM, that the Alabama Hills arch will be a lot more familiar after this summer because it has been selected to be on the America the Beautiful Interagency Pass for 2008. It was selected through a competitive process and the photographer who took the picture was honored.

This pass is available to anyone. It is good for one year from date of purchase. It is good for access to any BLM, Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, United States Bureau of Reclamation and Forest Service sites that charge entrance or standard amenity fees.

The pass costs $80 and when you buy it at a local site, most of the money stays local. So buy you pass here at the Interagency Visitors Center, Manzanar, and Death Valley to keep the money local. The BLM does not have any fee lands in Inyo County.
The Stewardship Partnership to protect and preserve the Alabama Hills in a semi-primitive state while encouraging appropriate access has been active for over a year now with various projects. The partnership developed when representatives of the community of Lone Pine ask the BLM for assistance, appeared before the RAC Committee and began working with various employees and volunteers. First they wrote a Vision statement for the area, then prioritized various projects and have worked to accomplishment them.

The Partnership had a clean-up of designated areas of the Alabama Hills and then the Healthy Communities group worked on upgrading the path out to the Arch, trying to get visitors to all use the same path. While this project had nothing to do with the choice of the Arch for the pass, it is perfect timing as it is expected there will be more visitors.
“We are very proud that this unusual landmark has been chosen, and we think many visitors now will not pass it up in their visit to the many recreational opportunities of Lone Pine and the Alabama Hills area,” stated Kathleen New, Director of the Lone Pine Chamber.

“Thousands of citizens will have our arch in their wallet or pocket during the summer,” mused Film Museum Director Chris Langley, an active member of the partnership. “It is great when something local in our beautiful landscape can be shared nationally. I am glad we have begun preparing for increased visitation to the Alabama Hills as undoubtedly this will occur now.”
The Partnership has led to a Steward position, a person who will be out meeting and greeting visitors, reminding them to “Don’t Crush the Brush.” Dave Kirk has been selected for this position. A great lover of the landscape and outdoors and an artist of note, Kirk spends his days taking care of the area and shaking a lot of visitors’ hands.

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Feburary 07, 2008:

There will be a "Rumble in the Rocks" June 7 the Lone Pine Film History Museum announced today as plans for the annual June dinner/concert fundraiser in the Alabama Hills were finalized.

The theme of this year's event is new and different. It will be 1950s in style and the organizers promise it "will be more fun than the Fifties ever were!"

The concert will be by Rumble King, a rock and roll, rhythm and blues band that has been playing regularly at Disneyland as well as other hot spots in L.A. It will be their first appearance locally in the county. The five member band has released three CDs, the most recent is called "When I Get There," and is getting a lot of notice. It will difficult not to get up and dance when they rev up their particular brand of music.

The evening will also feature a beautiful elegant dinner with the boulders of Lone Ranger Canyon illuminated as the sun sets over the Sierra Nevada. The annual fundraiser has proven a perennial favorite and will again sell-out as it has the last few years.
Earlier in the day there will be a 1950’s style movie musical screened to get everyone in the mood and special tours of the museum for those interested.

Tickets can be purchased at $80 a piece by going on line to the Museum Gift shop, or by calling 760-876-9103.

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Janurary 5, 2008: Mothers used to teach their youngsters “Fools’ names and fools’ faces often appear in public places.” Perhaps the lesson has been lost because graffiti keeps appearing in the Alabama Hills. Rich Williams and Jim Jennings worked several hours a few months back, and the paint was very resistant to cleaning up. A location on Tuttle Creek and Ruiz Hill were both desecrated by multiple attacks. No one was ever apprehended for the vandalism.

Graffiti has happened again. This time the area just west of the Gunga Din Temple site has been hit, with some racist overtones. The Alabama Hills Stewardship Partnership, including the BLM Bishop Regional Office, community of Lone Pine, LP Chamber and the LP Film Museum and Film Commission, have been working on several maintenance challenges being faced by the area. Use has created litter so twenty-five local volunteers worked cleaning high use areas one Saturday in late September.

Now, Dave Kirk has been hired to act as the Steward of the area, greeting people, answering questions and general “pressing the flesh with handshakes.” He will be looking out for the welfare of everyone including the plants and animals of the Hills.
Dave is a great interpreter of the beautiful landscape through painting. His many watercolor and oil works, both realistic and abstract, can be seen about town: at the Espresso Parlor, Seasons restaurant and on the façade of the new Thompson Hostel on Main Street.

The Stewardship Committee hopes to enlist everyone’s care and vigilance in ending the graffiti. Should anyone see people committing vandalism in the area, they should contact the Sheriffs Department, BLM Office in Bishop at 873-2400 and ask for Jim Jennings or call Chris Langley at 937-1189 as soon as possible. The BLM has special cleaning machinery and chemicals to work to clear off the vandalism as soon as possible. The LADWP also supports this work on their lands that lie next to the BLM and Forest Service lands in and near the Alabama Hills.

If you see Dave Kirk up in the Alabamas, please stop and say hello and ask any questions you might have about the various stewardship projects.

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December 31, 2007:

Two women from the Owens Valley were honored in November at the National Association for Interpretation National Workshop in Wichita, Kansas. Joy Fatooh of Bishop and Gretel Enck of Independence were recognized for excellence in the field of interpretation.

Ms. Fatooh is a wildlife biologist with the Bureau of Land Management Bishop Field Office. The BLM Excellence in Interpretation and Environmental Education award recognizes outstanding employees for their performance in enhancing the public’s understanding of the cultural and natural resources of public lands. Ms. Fatooh was selected as a finalist for this national award for her contributions to the creation of In the Alabama Hills of Lone Pine, California: Movie Road Self-Guided Tour, a guide to 10 locations that served as the setting for classic Hollywood movies. Joy also worked with partner organizations to develop a “Don’t Crush the Brush” campaign to make film crews aware of the fragility of Alabama Hills vegetation. A talented artist, Joy also contributedillustrations for the new Interagency Visitor Center in Lone Pine.

Ms. Enck is a park guide at Manzanar National Historic Site in Independence. The National Park Service Freeman Tilden Award, named for a pioneer in the field of interpretation, is an annual award recognizing outstanding contributions to the public through interpretation by an NPS employee. Ms. Enck was selected as the Pacific West Region nominee for this national award for planning, coordinating, and installing the special exhibit “GULAG: Soviet Forced Labor Camps and the Struggle for Freedom.” Gretel organized the only showing of the traveling exhibit in the western United States, hosting teacher workshops, film screenings, and a companion photo exhibit. The Gulag exhibit was on display at the Eastern California Museum for most of 2007.

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December 22, 2007:

Recently, Brent Maddock, one of the writing partners who created Tremors, stopped by the Museum and enjoyed the exhibits.
When the Director Ron Underwood, writer S.S. Wilson, and Producer Nancy Roberts visited a few years back and did a panel at the Festival, Brent was unable to attend. He is busy with projects, even though the writers' strike has slowed everything down. He comes through Lone Pine from time to time because his brother-in-law lives in Bishop and was surprised by the museum and all it had on display. He also enjoyed the orientation film immensely.

He had very kind words for the Tremors exhibit, which, of course, he had a great interest in. Looking at some production stills on display, he was surprised how much younger he was when he was here working on the film. He was particularly pleased with all the work and enthusiasm our student intern Sage Haithcoate had put into his design of the exhibit. High School Senior Sage is a great fan of the movie series and designed the entire exhibit.

Nancy Roberts facilitated the gift of the graboid puppets and other props from Universal studios. Michael Gross contributed his script, hat and chair back from the location. The Langley collection of Tremors posters from around the world have also added to the quality of the display. The Museum is always interested in more material.

When Executive Director Chris Langley spoke with Maddock about the plans to make one of the themes of the 2008 Festival "Writers of the Purple Sage," he was very enthusiastic about working on a panel focused on the art of adapting prose to movie script. During the chat, he stressed the "discipline of telling the story in 90 pages and getting everything moving quickly but entertainingly." He hopes to be able to attend the Festival October 10-12.

He and his writing partner Steve Wilson have just signed on to adapt a novel called The Adventures of Slim and Howdy, a novel to be published in early 2008, to the screen. The book is written by Kix Brooks, Ronnie Dunn and Stephen A. Bly. Bly is the writer of Christan westerns and Maddock indicated that the film project would be a western.

Maddock and Wilson wrote many other successful projects including the science fiction film Short Circuit. He has stated that the idea came out of an educational film that Wilson had written called "How to Write a Library Report." "That little film had a small robot (built and stop-motion animated by Steve) as its star. We thought we could use the film as a selling tool to raise money to do a low budget feature film about a robot. We wanted our film school buddy, Ron Underwood, who had directed this particular short, to direct the feature if and when we ever got it written and found funding."

The script turned out to be Short Circuit and everyone wanted it. It was produced but Ron was not hired as the director, so eventually the team wrote Tremors for Underwood to direct. Wilson has explained the idea came from ant lions he had observed while working on an educational film at Ridgecrest.

Brent updated us on Ron Underwood's work lately. He just directed a film for television called Holiday in Handcuffs, which was very well received. He also directed a Reaper episode titled "Magic" and two Boston Legal episodes. Brent said that William Shatner had started calling Ron "The Kid," which gave Ron a "big kick."

Hopefully we'll see this team reunited soon and back in Lone Pine working, who knows, maybe on a western.

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December 03, 2007:

The Lone Pine Community’s love and respect for the Alabama Hills was again seen in a project sponsored by Healthy Communities and BLM staff working together to make the trail to the famous arch easy to find and follow. Healthy Communities Director Charles James was able to recruit five Lo-Inyo Middle School students from Mrs. Harry’s class to spend time giving back to the land and the community one Sunday, a few weeks back by working on the Alabama Hills Arch Trail Restoration Project.

James explained, While we had anticipated and hoped for more, we did have five very good Lo-Inyo 8th grade students show up to help us with this project: Alicia Niehaus, Rachel Martin, Javier Hernandez, Neil Bhakta, and Robert (a.k.a. Bubba) Hunter.
After having breakfast at McDonalds courtesy of Kevin and Lis Mazzu, the group drove out to the work site. When we arrived  the students received a short safety talk from BLM Outdoor Recreation Planner Rich Williams and then instruction on what we were trying to accomplish today from BLM’s Scott Justham. These students hauled a lot of rocks to line the main trail leading to the Alabama Hills’ Arch

James continued, "The purpose was to try to get the foot traffic on the main trail and off the small spider web of trails that have resulted from not having a marked trail. While we got quite a bit done, we’ve discussed rescheduling another day to finish off what we started. The students seem amenable. Despite a forecast of rain, it was actually quite nice as you can see from the photosat least for the first couple of hours, but a storm front came in quickly by 1:00 p.m. as we were knocking off for the day and it started to get a little cool, blustery, and eventually began to rain."

The BLM Regional Office in Bishop has been working with the community of Lone Pine in a Stewardship project (see other stories in this issue) and this was another example of that work paying off.

Charles James reflected the feelings of the entire group when he stated, "The folks from the BLM were great to work with and I think it's safe to say that for the students that participated, that they really enjoyed working with them. The fact that these students were there says much about their character. Thanks for your support in gaining their interest."
As an added incentive for the students, Healthy Communities made a donation to the school for $100 toward the 8th Grade Graduation Catalina Trip or to whatever purpose the school chooses.

landscapesbanner.jpgOctober 24, 2007:

An art show of nearly fifty landscape painters will explore interpretations of the Eastern Sierra at the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History. The show opens November 16th and will run through January 20, 2008.

The Film Museum has taken on the mission of exploring and study the interpretation of the landscape of the mountains and desert of the Owens Valley and Death Valley. Executive Director Chris Langley commented, "Most of the films made in our area rely heavily on the landscape. In fact the land serves as a character in many western films. It is only natural we would develop context for the Museum's focus by exploring what painters and artists have done with the inspiration of the land."

The show is being organized by Albert C. Salton, a Dean at UCLA, and local artist Dan Dickman. The group in this noon-juried show includes members of the Henry Fukuhara workshop that have been working in the area for the last ten years. Dickman states that the artists are all "seasoned and mature," and the results will be varied and undoubtedly exciting. There are many styles and even different media involved in the artwork being gathered for the show.

"We are excited by the idea of the show," Langley stated. "It will be our first in the new museum, and we think the nearly fifty works of art will add an extra dimension to the movie production photos and posters that we display."

Western films are often about the individual against the backdrop of the wide-open vistas of the western viewscape. "We see the value of the background of the films as the 'epic and intimate' landscape and we have a small display that introduces the visitor to this concept. It is part of the answer to why so many films have chosen our area for location."

All the paintings that are presented by the artists will be for sale. Many would make a very special gift for the holiday season coming up and the Museum will appreciate a thirty percent donation of the price of the artwork from the artist upon sale. There are no size limitations on the work, and the exhibit will actually spread out throughout the halls of the museum so people will view it in the context of the Museum's many exhibits.

For additional information on the hours and other questions, call 876-9909 and speak with Rob Barron.

October 23, 2007:

Spellbinder Books and The Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History are pleased to be teaming up again to bring an author to the Owens Valley. Since Halloween is just around the corner, it's the perfect time for a visit from Gena Philibert-Ortega, author of the new book, Cemeteries of the Eastern Sierra. The book, published just last month by Arcadia Publishing, is a treasure trove of local history and photos, and covers a wide range of sites on the East Side, including Lone Pine, Independence, Manzanar, Bishop, Benton, Bodie and even Bridgeport, to name a few.

This is the second in a series of author appearances the Museum and Bookstore have collaborated on. Spellbinder owner Lynne Almeida believes that "part of the mission of the bookstore is to bring interesting cultural and educational events to the area through author visits. We're really pleased to be partnering with the Museum, to be able to offer authors two great locations and communities in which to present their books." "And," adds Chris Langley, the Museum's Executive Director, "the more successful and well-attended events we can put on through both venues, the more authors will find it enjoyable and worth their while to tour the East Side."

Author Gena Philibert-Ortega says, "Cemeteries are fragile windows into the past. Those of the Eastern Sierra trace the area's history back more than 100 years … This book is not meant to be an exhaustive guide to all cemeteries or grave sites in the region … [it] is but a small look at some of the many cemeteries in this region and the people who helped make its history. I hope this book will serve as a catalyst to better understanding our history and respecting those who came before us." She will be giving a presentation on the book in addition to signing copies.

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September 18, 2007:

The Lone Pine Film History Museum will publish their next book filming the West of Zane Grey by Ed Hulse at the beginning of the Lone Pine Film Festival this year. Author Ed Hulse will present a short program on the famous American West author at the Museum Members Dinner Thursday night October 4 at the Lone Pine Piute-Shoshone Community Center at 6 pm
Then during the Festival there will be screenings of several movies based on the novels and short stories of Zane Grey during the Lone Pine Film Festival at the LPHS Auditorium.

The book is very authoritative and has been developed and research over the last decade. There are two introductory essays to begin the book. One is on the life of Zane Grey and his career, and the second focuses on the making of the films based on his writing. Twenty-one of these were made in the area, the first The Border Legion filmed in Bishop in 1924.

The rest of the lengthy book describes each movie, the credits; plot summary and critical reviews at the time. The book is also crammed with photos from each of the more than one hundred films. Chris Langley, Executive Director of the Film Museum stated,” We are very proud of this book, our second published by the Museum publishing wing. The book will become the authoritative source for academics and fans to go to research Zane Grey and his films.”

Then the Film Festival weekend will celebrate the publication of book with four films based on Zane Grey’s novels being shown the LPHS Auditorium. All the films were made in Lone Pine. Langley explained, “Friday we begin at12:00 PM with Wild Horse Mesa starring Tim Holt. It involves a brilliant wild horse named Panquitch.”

pix-of-zane-greyw.jpgThe Zane Grey mini festival continues Saturday with Knights of the Range at 9:45 AM. This film also celebrates singing cowboy Eddie Dean’s centennial as he appears in the film. At 4:15 P.M. That afternoon Randolph Scott and Harry Carey star in Buffalo Stampede, which was named originally and based on Grey’s novel The Thundering Herd. Finally, on Sunday we will be screening Nevada at 2:15 PM starring Robert Mitchum. In fact, after some appearances in Hoppy films this was his first starring role.
We have also created a small exhibit on the writings and career of Zane Grey with first editions of all the Lone Pine film novels, examples of other publications including a rare Soldier’s edition of a Grey novel, comic books, original letters and photographs from Grey’s life. Come to Lone Pine and watch some great Zane Grey films film festival weekend.”

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August 27, 2007:

CONTACT: Chris Langley< > cell 760-937-1189

What was it like to be the most famous and successful singing cowboy from 1940 to 1970? Their lives were filled with one-night shows in big and small towns, at rodeos, state fairs and in large venues like Madison Square Garden in New York City. It was a time in America, which is now gone, but not forgotten.

Johnny Bond, musician, composer and friend to Gene Autry lived and remembered to write it all down in first hand recollections of the days and nights. The Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History selected his recollections as their first book of their new publishing wing. The book entitled “Thirty Years on the Road With Gene Autry” was published and June and can be purchased now. Why would you enjoy reading the memoir bringing to life a very special time in the Americana music scene?

In 1940 when Johnny Bond went to work for Gene Autry as a member of the Jimmy Wakely Trio, Autry was arguably the most popular entertainer in the country. He was Number Four on the list of Hollywood’s Top Ten Box Office stars. He had sold millions of records as one of the most popular recording artists of the 1930’s. His “Melody Ranch Show,” heard weekly over the CBS Radio Network, sold billions of sticks of Doublemint for its sponsor during a seventeen year run. He also performed before sellout crowds, two shows a day for 21 straight days, in New York’s Madison Square Garden.

Composer and musician Johnny Bond was there in every phase of Autry’s career for the next thirty years. When Bond finished the manuscript in the early 1970’s, Autry vetoed it being published at the time because he felt it was too personal and revealing for his fans. Now such celebrity biographies are a common thing, and this one is tame by comparison. However, Bond does capture the picture of a man who saw money as the center of his life and human existence, probably stemming from his poverty experienced by his family in his youth.

Not only was the music scene entirely different but the country was as well. For readers who remember those times, this book will vividly bring it all back. For the younger generation, this book will bring back to life one aspect of the music scene your parents or grandparents enjoyed.

Born in Oklahoma when author Johnny Bond was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1999 fans were surprised. Industry insiders were not. Bond had gotten his start with the Jimmy Wakely Trie and then joined Gene Autry. He never toured to promote himself and his own music. He had written many country classics, which was celebrated when he was elected to the Nashville Songwriter’s Hall of Fame. The point is he was always associated with singing cowboys and cowboy music, and he was there on the inside to know how it really was: he good times and the bad.

The book can be ordered at $29.95 by calling 760-876-9103, or by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Better yet, it can be purchased by visiting the Lone Pine Film History Museum Gift Shop at 701 South Main Street in Lone Pine.

The Lone Pine Film Festival is dedicated to the American tradition of the Singing Cowboy this year. Johnny Bond’s daughter Sherry, who was instrumental in getting her father’s story into print, will be at the Festival, appearing at the Museum and on a panel on The Singing Cowboy at 3:30 PM Saturday, October 6.

March 19, 2007: On Saturday 2nd of June the full moon will shine down on us as we enjoy a feast of a dinner in the famous Lone Ranger Canyon tucked in the Alabama Hills. This years' Dinner in the Rocks promises to be another wonderful evening and we are so proud that RW Hampton will kindly be performing for us under the stars!


rwporchcloseupmed.jpgRW was named 2006 Western Music Male Vocalist of the Year for the fourth time by the Academy of Western Artist at the ceremony held in Texas last September Hampton can be counted among America's foremost Western entertainers…his wonderfully rich baritone voice has been captured on ten CDs to date. RW is more than a gifted cowboy singer; he has performed in a dozen western movies, co-wrote and starred in the one-man show The Last Cowboy as well as being recognized eight times by various Western associations for his song-writing.Dinner will be a Taste of Lone Pine with the towns' premier restaurants each offering up one of their specialties for our delectation. Glorious local musical favorites, Sandy and Clayton, will serenade us through dinner and take to the stage prior to RW Hampton. There will be two raffles; one a fifty-fifty with the extraordinary bonus of a luxury weekend in the Bungalow at Benton Hot Springs, kindly extended by Bill and Diane Bramlette. The other is for another incredibly beautiful quilt created and executed by the Lone Pine Quilters Guild.

 

The evening is always a glorious one as who can picture anything more wonderful that the sun setting over the Easter Sierra Nevada, a full moon rising and the edges of the stars melting over a gathering of like-minded people celebrating the singing cowboy and all the good solid beliefs that come with terrain…..we look forward to our annual dinner under the stars in the unique Alabama Hills and hope to see you there!
For further information and ticket booking, call Barbara on 760 876 9103

Feburary 20, 2007:

SATURDAYS at 7pm in the Film History Museum Movie Theater. Admission: 
a suggested donation is between $3 and $5.


The schedule of other films is as follows
FEBRUARY 24:
Tremors - A small town gradually becomes aware of a strange creature which picks off people one by one. But what is this creature, and where is it? At the same time, a seismologist is working in the area, she detects….tremors….The creature lives underground, and can 'pop up' without warning. Trapped in their town, the town-folk have no escape…. (English / 96 mins)
MARCH 3:
Gunga Din - Based loosely on the poem by Rudyard Kipling, this takes place in British India during the Thuggee uprising. Three fun- loving sergeants are doing fine until one of them wants to get married and leave the service. The other two trick him into a final mission where they end up confronting the entire cult by themselves as the British Army is entering a trap. (in Hollywood English / 117 mins)
MARCH10:
Bride and Prejudice - A Bollywood update of Jane Austen's classic tale, in which Mrs. Bakshi is eager to find suitable husbands for her four unmarried daughters. When the rich single gentlemen Balraj and Darcy come to visit, the Bakshis have high hopes, though circumstance and boorish opinions threaten to get in the way of romance. Bollywood meets Hollywood... And it's a perfect match! (in English / 107 mins)
MARCH 17 :
Star Trek V: Final Frontier - When the newly-christened starship Enterprise's shakedown cruise goes poorly, Captain Kirk and crew put it into Spacedock for repairs. But an urgent mission interrupts their Earth-bound shore leave. A renegade Vulcan named Sybok has taken several ambassadors hostage on the planet Nimbus III, an event which also attracts the attention of a Klingon captain who wants to make a name for himself. Sybok's rag- tag army captures the Enterprise and takes it on a journey to the center of the galaxy in search of the Supreme Being. (in English and a touch of Klingon /107 mins)
MARCH 24:
Cuando Habla el Corazon with Pedro Infante (When the Heart Speaks) - A story of three friends from different backgrounds, they loose touch and are reunited. This is the film that brought Mexican superstar Pedro Infante to the screen. It includes eight musical numbers featuring four Infante classics....a true classic not to be missed, especially to get a taste of glorious Mexican cinema and glamorous stars! (in Spanish with English subtitles / 2hrs 10mins)
MARCH 31:
Smoke Signals - Young Indian man Thomas is a nerd in his reservation, wearing oversize glasses and telling everyone stories no-one wants to hear. His parents died in a fire in 1976, and Thomas was saved by Arnold. Arnold soon left his family (and his tough son Victor), and Victor hasn't seen his father for 10 years. When Victor hears Arnold has died, Thomas offers him funding for the trip to get Arnold's remains, but only if Thomas will also go with him. Thomas and Victor hit the road. (in English / 89 mins)

 

fedex-cavemans.jpgFeburary 09, 2007: For some not too interested in the game, this year's Super Bowl featured Clydesdale horses and a giant erector set that may prove fascinating to Owens Valley residents.
The commercials of the Super Bowl have become quite a phenomenon with companies paying millions of dollars for a minute of time. Budweiser Beer and Toyota Tundra trucks will be spotlighted on two of these commercials shot locally.
Film Commissioner Chris Langley said there is no telling when they will be aired, but hopefully it will be early in the game. "Last year we also had two commercials that were made for the Super Bowl although they were shown repeatedly in various lengths afterwards for several months."
In what has become an item of local pride, last year's Fedex and Budweiser commercials were voted the first and second most popular commercials by the viewers. The Fedex commercial featured a caveman using a pterodactyl to ship a stick. The effort ends badly when a Tyrannosaurus Rex eats the stick carrier. When his boss in a cave in the Alabamas balls him out, he leaves the "office" to get stepped on by a big dinosaur foot. Hasn't everyone felt that way at work at some point?
"The commercial went on to be honored with an Emmy," Langley explained. The Budweiser commercial, filmed in the same spot as this year's by the same company MJZ, featured the horses, a streaker and many animal spectators. "The company came back because they were happy with the help given locally, especially by Rod Ayers and the leasees of the field Smith Ranch. The DWP actually owns the land and they have been very cooperative with filming locally."
The actual storyboard of the new commercials is top secret. "We have all been asked to not talk about it," Langley explained. When you film next to a busy highway like 395, part of the mystery can be see by anyone driving the Owens Valley corridor." Anonymous Films worked for a month constructing what looked like a large tinker toy contraption. "Sheriff Bill Lutze, Notary Dorothy Bonnefin and I were asked to sign affidavits for the Guinness Book of World Records about what we saw when the apparatus actually worked."
"We'll just have to see how it turns out," Langley concluded. "One thing we know, the locations will be magnificent."

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Feburary 08, 2007:

The Duke would have been one hundred years old this year on May 26th. The Duke was a special kind of American nobility: a movie star. John Wayne is undoubtedly one of the most famous of our celebrities, know world -wide. To commemorate his fame and his connection with Lone Pine, the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History will begin a weekly film series in which all of his Lone Pine films will be shown, along with a few documentaries about his life and career.
The series will screen every Thursday night at the Museum at 7 pm. The series will be a fundraiser for the museum and to help cover costs, a donation of a minimum of $3 is suggested. The series begins on Thursday, February 8th with a John Ford /John Wayne collaboration called 3 Godfathers. A brief lecture with notes for the audience will be presented at the beginning of the evening. Much of this particular film was shot in Death Valley with stories of the cast and crew's stay at Furnace Creek classic Ford/Wayne legend. The Lone Pine sections were made north of the railroad depot and local resident Joy Anderson remembers meeting Ford there as a young girl.

 

The schedule of other films is as follows
FEBRUARY 8:
3 Godfathers (1948)
FEBRUARY 15
The New Frontier (1935) King of the Pecos (1936)
FEBRUARY 22:
I Cover the War (1937) A&E Biography of John Wayne
MARCH 1:
Somewhere In Sonora (1933), The Lawless Range (1935)
MARCH 8 :
Blue Steel (1934) Man From Utah (1934)
MARCH 15:
Westward Ho (1935) Three Faces West (1940)
MARCH 22:
Tycoon (1947)
MARCH 29:
North To Alaska (1960)
APRIL 5:
True Grit (1969)
MAY 12:
Author Chris Enss, author of The Young Duke Special event
MAY 26:
John Wayne's 100th Birthday
The series will conclude with a presentation by author Chris Enss whose new book The Young Duke was just published. There will be a wonderful dinner at Boulder Creek RV Park on May 12 when Enss will discuss her work and sign first edition copies of her book.
Additional information about any of the events in this program can be obtained by calling the Museum at 760-876-9909.

September 26, 2006:

by Chris Langley
showdown_westbaseball.jpgThe western short "The Showdown" filmed in Lone Pine and San Bernardino will be screened during the Lone Pine Film Festival on Saturday October 7 at 4 pm in the brand new Museum Wild West Movie Theatre. After the screening, producer John Mazzarella and directors Fulvio and Antonio Sestito will discuss the project, the new filmmaking methods employed and answer questions.This project is interesting for local residents and Festival fans alike for several reasons. First, it is one of the earliest projects in which the Inyo Film Commission participated and demonstrates the powerful partnership being developed between the Commission and the Film Festival. Filmmakers now can benefit from the assistance of the Commission and then come back and exhibit their film at the annual film festival. Special showings can also be arranged during the year at the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History Wild West Movie Theatre. The theatre has the very latest projection equipment and seats 85.
While many critics and fans have announced the death of the western, the genre keeps returning in new forms and guises. Considered one of the truly original American genres, whether in written or in visual format, the western once ruled the box office and the air waves, but has been absent in the last few decades except in a few unique examples.
This film is an attempt to see the genre in a new way. The production notes state, "'The Showdown' brings together two aspects that are uniquely American, Baseball and the Old West. It is a short action/drama film, about the confrontation between a pitcher and batter in the bottom of the ninth inning of a run-run baseball game, juxtaposed against a deadly duel between two gunfighters in the Old West."
At first glance, the joining of these two very American cultural expressions might seem challenging, but the directors show the parallels both through technical manipulation of the format as well as careful story construction. They state that the film "is about duels and duality, and sets out to explore and challenge the relationship between baseball and the Old West. The film portrays the story of The Batter and Jonathan C. Edwards, two men fighting for their destiny and trying to overcome their fears against the nightmares of their past. It is a story about loss and redemption, and how history can repeat itself." That is a lot of work for a fifteen minute film.Fulvio and Antonio Sestito both studied directing at Cinecita in their native city of Rome, before coming to Los Angeles and studying at UCLA Extension, Film and Television program. Having graduated in 2004 in Directing, Cinematography and Post-Production, they have written, produced and directed several narrative and documentary projects. The idea for "The Showdown" came from producer John Mazzarella. After several drafts, the script was ready but the three men decided on a rather extended preproduction period because of the demands of budget and schedule.

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Director of Photography Deland Nuse and the Sestito brothers undertook lengthy discussions and research to establish the visual tone of the film. The filmmakers' intent was to set up a decisive visual style that would play a pivotal and evolving character in the story. It would reflect the arc of emotional subtext that the two lead characters experience during the progression of the film.
The directors explained their technical approach. "The Baseball segment is characterized by a cool and desaturated color palette, longer lenses and faster camera moves. These aspects are juxtaposed against the western portion, which presents warmer tonalities, wider lenses and smooth camera movements. As the story progresses and the similarities between Baseball and the Old West become more apparent, the visual style of the two segments shifts to more natural colors and similar camera angles that bring the two periods closer together."
Another innovation from modern filmmaking relied on was detailed storyboarding and 3D previsualization techniques. Storyboard artist Jim Marquez created more than 300 boards to represent in detail each shot of the movie. The drawings were later scanned into digital files and edited together with a temporary soundtrack into an animated story-reel.
"It was like seeing the flow and rhythm of the film before it was even shot" John Mazzarella remarked. "In addition, illustrator David Zohm collaborated with the directors to render many illustrations that would help establish the look and feel of the film. This extensive preparation was essential to ensure a fast and smooth production process." Stills, the storyboard, script and other materials are on display in the window of the Lone Pine Chamber of Commerce.
The directors were drawn to Lone Pine because of the sand dunes of the dry Owens Lake juxtaposed against the snowy Sierra Nevada Mountain range. "Lone Pine is one of the most beautiful and suggestive locations in California. And as soon as we arrived there, while scouting for a desert plateau, we immediately knew we had found what we were looking for."
Film historian and critic Philip French has written, "The western genre is a great grab bag, a hungry cuckoo of a genre, a voracious bastard of a form, open equally to visionaries and opportunists, ready to seize anything in the air from juvenile delinquency to ecology. Yet despite this, or in some ways because of it, one of the things the Western is always about is America rewriting and reinterpreting her own past, however honestly or dishonestly it may be done."
"The Showdown" in fifteen minutes illustrates the ongoing effort of the western genre attempting to reinvent itself. How successful it is will be determined by the audience. The event is free with a Film Festival Souvenir Button, or a ticket costs $5, with limited seating.

August 15, 2006:

pouring-sidewalks.jpgA question being asked a lot during this year around Lone Pine is when will the Film History Museum be finished. The answer from the folks behind the project is "Never."
The answer for the question might seem a little facetious but the explanation makes sense. Hopefully, a museum is a living, growing organism, not a static, unchanging building of old dusty artifacts. History is a living story and the Board of Directors and volunteers intend for the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History to be different each time a visitor returns.When the Museum was dedicated in June, many of the exhibits were just prototypes, indications of what material and content items and text would be in that particular area. Already, modifications have begun and Chris Langley, Executive Director and Claiborne Mitchell, the new director of the museum who is now on-board, are changing exhibits, rethinking how to tell the story of filming in Inyo County since it began in 1915.
Actually, the history is also growing as new research continues to uncover more information about the activities of Hollywood here particularly in the early years. Langley's regular columns in The Inyo Register have described this early history, pushing the date of the beginning of filming back to 1915 in the area and uncovering additional films that filmed scenes here before 1920.
As far as the museum building itself is concerned, recently the sidewalks and curbs were poured and this week the asphalt for the parking lots is being added, giving the museum the finished look. Additional neon will be added to the façade as well.
Inside three full-scale resin horses, lifelike in detail, have been added to the exhibit area. They will be used to display silver parade saddles that have been loaned from the James E. Rogers collection. Since the dedication on June 17th, six framed three sheets; a large six sheet and other posters from the Rogers collection have also been mounted in the lobby area. By the middle of August, installation of all the theater projection equipment, screen and curtains will be completed and regular showings of the museum orientation film The Reel West will begin as well as additional movie screenings for locals and visitors alike.
The Museum store will be open Monday through Saturday from 12 until 4 after the parking lot is finished and often there are personnel all day and the doors unlocked for those who want to stop in and take a peek at the exhibit construction often underway.
Besides, the Museum has the best air conditioning in town these hot summer days.

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July 10, 2006:

It was all about community and cowboys when Lone Pine and surrounding towns in Inyo County gathered on Friday and Saturday, June 16th and 17th to dedicate the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History.
The event was surrounded by a series of celebrations and fundraisers that culminated in the banquet and concert entitled "A Celebration with Chaparral," held in famous Lone Ranger Canyon. Guests were treated to an elegant sit-down dinner co catered by two restaurants in town, the Merry-Go-Round and Bonanza, which featured a choice of tri-tip with burgundy mushroom sauce, chicken marsala or a vegetarian pasta.
Friday the community of supporters who have worked for more than five years and faced varied obstacles to get the 10,5000 square foot museum built and filled with exhibits, were invited in for a first "sneak peek." The museum is an outgrowth of the Lone Pine Film Festival, which has its 17th annual celebration October 6-8th 2006.
71006_5_5.jpgWhen the doors opened after weeks of intense and frenetic preparation, the crowd saw exhibits, posters, vehicles and artifacts, which told the rich story of filming in and around Lone Pine and Inyo County, California since 1920. The building was made possible by a gift of one million dollars from Mr. and Mrs. Rogers.Jim Rogers also offered his extensive western collection to the museum designers. He has been purchasing additional items over the last several years to inaugurate the museum's collection.
The small desert community, nestled between Mt. Whitney and Death Valley, fundraised an additional $400,000 to buy the land on Highway 395, which will accommodate additional museum construction in the future.
The museum itself has a large lobby, which has the 20th Century Fox stagecoach used in several film features made in the area. The vehicle is fully restored. The lobby walls are lined with huge three sheets and a six sheet for The Hitch-hiker, one of the many non-westerns made in the famous Alabama Hills. The posters introduce the visitor to the diverse films genres that have been filmed in the area. Off one side of the lobby is the brand new Museum Store with western wear and jewelry, movie souvenirs and on the other side down a poster lined hallway is the 85 seat Wild West Movie theater which will keep B westerns flickering on a large screen.
The main exhibit area contains two wonderful vintage cars associated with films of the area. There is the Plymouth coupe that Humphrey drove up to Mt. Whitney as Roy "Mad Dog" Earle to meet his destiny on High Sierra. On the other side is the Buick Eight convertible that contained Peggy Stewart over which Gene Autry (doubled by Joe Yrogoyen) jumped Champion in Trail to San Antone. Exhibits nearby focus on the careers of Roy Rogers and Gene Autry, the making of Gunga Din, Villains, and nine other western reel heroes all of whom worked in Lone Pine multiple times.

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The large science fiction area contains the actually large worm from Tremors, along with miniatures and artifacts from other Lone Pine films including Star Treks 5 and 7, Crossworlds and the cult classic Bamboo Saucer.
A hat display contains headwear from people who worked in Lone Pine such as Barbara Stanwyck, Tom Mix, Ken Maynard, Hopalong Cassidy, Tex Ritter and many more. The costume wardrobe has the beaded dress given by Ruth Terry and costumes from westerns including Hallelujah Trail. There is also the On Location Wardrobe of Emmy winning designer Joie Hutchinson. The Stuntmen section contains Loren Janes' valise and stunt equipment, and the director's chair, director's script and frames one sheet from William A. Wellman, a gift of the Wellman family.
A Children's Discovery Room rounds out the rooms but many surprises await the visitor for the museum will continue to grow and change.
At the dedication ceremony, Board member Cheryl Rogers Barnett offered the invocation, and Board member Jaque Hickman and Executive Director Chris Langley spoke of the community's work in coming together with many partners to make the museum a reality.

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After the symbolic ribbon was cut, a Lone Pine Home and Garden Tour, another fundraiser for the museum, took place.Fundraising continues for the movie theater with seat sponsorship available for $150 and larger donations are welcome. The museum is also interested in obtaining artifacts and memorabilia of the stars and movies that worked in the area to preserve them and use them to tell the unique story of filming done in the area. Nearly 400 feature films have shot in the area and 100 television show episodes. Countless commercials have also used the area and filming continues today.
For additional information on becoming part of this on-going project call 760-876-9909 or go on-line to the websites:lonepinefilmfestival.org and lonepinefilmhistorymuseum.org. You too can become part of the community of fans and western enthusiasts supporting the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History

 

Museum_FP3The Beverly and Jim Rogers Lone Pine Film History Museum’s, located at 701 South Main Street in Lone Pine, California, celebrates and preserves the diverse movie history of Lone Pine, Death Valley and the Eastern Sierra. 

Film fans will be following the “Trail to Lone Pine” this year on the Columbus Day weekend, October 8-10th. Those are the dates for the twenty-first annual Lone Pine Film Festival. The now world famous film festival focuses on the films made in Lone Pine, Death Valley and the eastern Sierra and has been favorite for film buffs in the know for more than two decades.


This year the trail leads to Lone Pine for those celebrating the 75th anniversary of Republic Pictures which begins on September 25th at the CBS Studios (the old Republic Studios lot.) Republic producers and directors loved going on location to Lone Pine as one of their favorite locations for nearly thirty years. The first Republic film, Westward Ho! starring John Wayne, in fact was their first released B western, a genre of film for which they became famous.

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Mark 16, 2006: Imagine having to set up a company of strangers who immediately have to set to work on a complex task in the rocks involving expensive equipment, long hours and lots of physical labor. Add waiting around for everything to be ready at the same time, often long hours punctuated by tense activity, and you have a movie company on location.

Throw in animals (a wolf and dog in this case), dust, weather, a limited budget, colds and changing light and you begin to understand the challenges facing the Hallmark Channel film like "Winter White" now working in and around Lone Pine and Independence. Undoubtedly, the crew of sixty-five and the cast, not to mention director Mark Griffiths, producers Jeff Kloss and Al Dickerson, the Production Designer, Location Manager, wardrobe, make-up , and all the rest of specialists needed to bring together a movie know each other much better by now.

Hallmark Channel programming is well established as "family fare," and this film is no different. A modern California ranching family story, the film focuses on a city boy who falls in love with a small town girl who wants to return to the town of Pine Gap where the family ranch is located. The town needs a doctor and Sadie Ryder just happens to be one. Whether her boy friend / lawyer can fit into small town life, not to mention make a living is at the heart of the plot. Sadie's father Karl is still grieving for his wife who died three years before, and does not want to give James a chance.

Besides the personal conflicts that help power the plot, the contrasts between city life and country life are at issue here. At first scriptwriter Marjorie Sweeney stereotypically presents these contrasts. Life is good in Pine Gap where the people go to craft classes, have a quilting guild, and support each other when challenges arise. Those of us who live in the small towns of the Owens Valley love where we live. However, the romantic enthusiasm of "flatlanders" for getting out of the rat race of Los Angeles to live here sometimes brings a cynical response from locals. Or am I just talking about myself?

winter-what-wolf.jpgWhen I started to read the script, my first reaction was amusement. "Oh, really, is life that perfect here? If they only knew." As I read on, I found that it was a description of life here in Lone Pine. Being a Hallmark Film, the script skipped over some of the challenges that families and individuals face here: drugs, alcohol, lack of economic opportunity. People do support each other here; we do enjoy simple things like watching tule elk or quail feed, rather than rushing off to the mall in our spare time. Life really is pretty good here, and this film celebrates that fact in a simple straight forward manner. It's nice to have Hollywood here to remind us of that occasionally.
Mark Griffiths is directing the film. His filmography includes familiar films like "Beethoven's 5th," "Behind Enemy Lines," " Tactical Assault" and "Hardbodies 1 and 2." He has also helmed several television films including "Max Is Missing," " The Cowboy and Movie Movie Star," "Jane Doe: The Wrong Face" and already in 2006 "Our House."

Griffths is one of those people you are soon calling by his first name. On one of the tech scouts while we were looking at ranches, Mark told me he had already shot footage outside of Bishop for a film of his called "Cheyenne Warrior." I was not familiar with the film. It was made in 1994 as a Roger Corman very low budget film. He said he had come up to shoot footage to add to the look of the film and had gotten three local cowboys to dress like Cheyenne braves on a very cold morning.

I immediately got a copy of the film and watched it. Sure enough there was footage of the Owens Valley and the Sierra, and I found myself enjoying the story very much. Starring Kelly Preston, the film's cast included Bo Hopkins, Dan Haggerty and Clint Howard and was mostly filmed in Simi Valley. It has a great story, very effective acting and a good script. I really liked it. Then I listened to the director's commentary and I discovered how they "cheated" the shots, skimped on the set and generally made up for the lack of budget.

It reminded once again that it is not big budgets that make fine films. It takes craftsmen, dedicated actors, and a good story. Throwing money at a bad film never makes it better.

Chances are you have run into the film company working somewhere in Southern Inyo during the last two weeks. They shot in the Alabamas, in Independence, and in Lone Pine at George Brown welding business, at the Totem, on Main Street, and in the park. It was at the Park that Pine Gap had its town Christmas tree lighting event. With all the familiar faces as extras playing the town's people of the fictional small town, it was just like Lone Pine's Christmas tree lighting ceremony that was held two months ago. It was a case of art imitating life.

"Winter White" will be finishing location work in the next day or so.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 1, 2006
Contact: Chris Langley
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Cell: (760) 937-1189
Office: (760) 876-9909
Fax: (760) 876-9910

March 13, 2006:

lone-pine-quilt.jpgThe rocky terrain of Lone Ranger Canyon in the Alabama Hills Recreation Area in Lone Pine, California, has been compared to many things. In certain light, the lines and curves of the rocks suggests a quilted pattern.

Master quilter, Valerie Bahl, saw this likeness and took on the challenge of capturing it in a "real" quilt. She worked from a picture taken after dark during the June 2005 "Under Western Stars" concert featuring western musical group, True West. Her design captures the patterns and textures of the rocks perfectly. Her quilt, Concert in the Rocks, was juried into the 2006 Road to California Quilt Show held in January of this year. The quilt may be viewed by visiting www.quartermoonquilts.com.

Ms. Bahl has donated her work to the Lone Pine Film History Museum to be used as a fundraiser through a drawing. Tickets are available at $1 donation for one, or six for $5. The drawing will be held at the June 17 dinner/concert.
The area depicted in the quilt is famous as a movie location site. Here is where the Lone Ranger was first ambushed on film in 1938. Such notables as Errol Flynn, John Wayne, Randolph Scott and Roy Rogers have filmed there as well.

Valerie lives in Sparks, Nevada but has a close contact with the Alabama Hills because her mother-in-law, Barbara Bahl, lives in Lone Pine and is co-chairman of the ticket and tour office for the Film Festival. Barb also happens to be an Audie Murphy enthusiast, who has located many sites used in the three films Murphy made in Lone Pine. Quilter Valerie Bahl, a graduate of Sacramento City College, is the owner of Quartermoon Quilts and has won two blue ribbons at the Nevada State Fair for her work. She is a Washoe County employee and a member of the Washoe Express Toastmasters.

The Lone Ranger Canyon site is where the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History holds an annual benefit gala out under the western stars. This year, "A Celebration With The Chaparral" will be held June 17, featuring a gourmet menu and western concert with The Chaparral to celebrate the completion of the Museum.
For information on the quilt and dinner/concert tickets, call (760) 876-9909 or check back here at the website.

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Construction Progress on The Museum January 12, 2006

February 19, 2006:

A weekend celebration of the completion of the Jim and Beverly Rogers Building for the Lone Pine Film History Museum will take place on June 16th and 17th in conjunction with the annual dinner-concert in the Alabama Hills at Lone Ranger Canyon.

Plans for various actrivities are now being made and will be announced soon.

The museum will be open in April with a small commemorative ceremony. This will be the beginning of the "soft" or shakedown operations. Many of the exhibits will be installed but finally details and testing of the projection and technical equipment will be underway.

In the evening there will be the gourmet banquet out in the rocks at the location where the Lone Ranger made his first film appearance, right where John Wayne, Randolph Scott, Errol Flynn and Gary Cooper all worked. The event will be capped by a concert out under the western stars.

Be sure to save this weekend for a once in a lifetime experience: the Grand Opening of the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History. Check the back at this site as plans are announced.

Many have wondered what a visit to the Museum will be like. What follows explains the plans for the museum in more detail.
As you approach the museum it is like walking back in time to the Saturday afternoon Bijou of the past. The façade is modeled after a real western art deco theater in Montana. A movie palace restoration artist created the neon sign and bands along with the six illuminated poster cases.

As you walk in, the beautiful fully restored movie stagecoach actually used in Lone Pine dominates the lobby. An interpretive exhibit explains the history of the stagecoach in settling the west, as well as Lone Pine film that feature a stagecoach. To you left is the Museum Store feature unique western gifts and film history memorabilia. Behind the store is the Museum Director's Office. To the right there are poster displays and exhibits on western film on the

wall of the Wild West Movie Theater.
As you enter the west exhibit area, you see a display featuring a Lone Ranger costume with benches on all sides. To your right you explore a major theme of westerns, the struggle to control water and land. The exhibit explored this theme in Roy Rogers's first starring role: Under Western Stars and other B westerns. The exhibit also tells the history of water in the local area.

As the visitor moves to the left, an exhibit explores the making of Gunga Din, Lone Pine's Hallmark film. "From Classic Poem to Classic Film: the Process of Creating a Movie" explores the many stepped process in creating a film from beginning to end using Gunga Din as an example.

Next is the Rogers Western Art Gallery featuring thematic selections from the Jim Rogers western art collection, displayed on a rotating basis.
The Badmen of Lone Pine: Villains from Black Hats to Psychos tells the story of the many villainous actors and actresses who made us his, boo and shudder when they appeared on the screen. Wallace Beery, Roy Barcroft, Pierce Leyden, Robert Mitchum, gangster Humphrey Bogart, The Hitchhiker William Talman, and Brad Pitt in Kalifornia are all there, Of special interest to film and car buffs alike is the car seen prominently in High Sierra driven by Bogart up the mountain to his death,

Science Fiction films are featured next. Costumes, posters, props and stills tell the story of Star Trek 5 and 7, Crossworlds and the Lone Pine connection to the Star Wars saga, Then you turn to your left just in time to jump at the actual "exploding head graboid," the Tremors worm given to us by Universal Studios. The Chang's store miniature and other props and pictures tell the story of how Hollywood makes the horrific very believable.

As we turn south, we see the Rogers Collection Of Silver Saddles in front of the flag from the fort of The Charge of the Light Brigade starring Errol Flynn and David Niven. Lone Pine hero Tex Ritter's saddle is on display as well.
The visitor rides on to the Red Dog Ghost Town named after the famous set from the 1930 sound musical Song of the West made here. You enter the Ghost Town to meet many of our western heroes, their stories told on a rotating basis with pictures, artifacts and film clips.

Nestled in front of the Ghost Town is the car from Trail to San Antone, from the Rogers Automobile Museum in Las Vegas. The work of stunt man Joe Yrigoyen, star Queen of the West Peggy Stewart and the singing cowboy Gene Autry are limned in this exhibit with posters, props and stills from their careers.

Now straight ahead is the Historic Costume Wardrobe Department, featuring the actual wardrobe from the career of Joie Hutchinson, Emmy winning designer as well as costumes from the B westerns and Asian epics including King of the Khyber Rifles.

Our films have always been about the kids in the audience and the future of the western remains with them. The Children's Discovery Room encourages kids to work on projects to understand better the principles of optics that make films work, doing crayon rubbings of props and western artifacts, as well as lounging on bean bag chairs while their parents explore their memories of the films of and heroes of yesteryear.

The final exhibits, Behind the Action and Behind the Camera, explore two aspects of the movie business: Stunt Men and Women and the directors. Loren Janes has given the Museum many pieces of his equipment he used preparing for stunts. The exhibit also illuminates the eight-step process from concept to final performance of a stunt for the movie How the West Was Won. Two directors are highlighted in the second exhibit. The Wellman family has made William A. Wellman's director's chair, annotated script for Yellow Sky and several other objects available. The William Witney family has presented several pieces as well including a director's chair, prop box and other material to explain Witney's development of the choreographed fight, that Quentin Tarrantino credits with making possible the popular action films today.

Many other stages of construction remain to be accomplished by the town of Lone Pine. The Museum site and the town property next door will become known as the Heritage Hub, a set of outdoor displays that further explain the local historical and cultural heritage of the area. The Heritage Park area will also include a baseball park, abuts the Willy Bonham Memorial Rodeo Grounds and will be the center of bike and walking trails called the Southern Inyo Heritage Trail. The Film History Museum becomes the central "anchor" to the development of the southern area of the town. Eventually an outdoor amphitheatre for summer walk in outdoor movies and various campfire performances will be constructed on the Museum lands itself.

Truly, the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine History will become the showplace of the area, a community center, and a cultural and recreationally attraction to the many tourists visiting the area.

 

November 14, 2005:

Dave Holland died on Monday, November 14 after a brave fight against cancer. He was surrounded by his wife Holly and close, long-time friends Dave and Kirsten Smirnoff at his home.

Dave was a friend of many in Lone Pine and around the world, having been a co-founder of the Lone Pine Film Festival in 1990, and an author and film historian with a special focus on the B westerns.

dave holland 1a.jpgDave was born on January 22, 1935 in Raleigh , North Caroilina and grew up in Birmingham, Alabama.He moved to Los Angeles in 1938 after two years at Auburn University.. Dave had many jobs during his life including photographic journalist in the Navy, Theatrical Press Agent, and Unit Production Manager. It was while working on location on commercials in the Lone Pine area that Dave recognized several landscapes from B westerns he had watched several times. This discovery led him to purchase movie stills from classic films and westerns, then come on location to the Alabama Hills to find the exct location where the camera was placed.

As his discoveries found during weekends spent roaming the scenic area accumulated, he made friends with local residents and the idea of a film festival focused on this unique history was created. Local resident Kerry Powell was the first Festival director in 1990, and Dave supplied the knowledge of locations, contacts with Hollywood and the event management expertise to begin the first film festival. Present director Chris Langley met with the team before that first event. Several local businesspersons have been deeply involved over the years, including Dow Villa owners Jeanne Willey and Lynne Bunn, Frotnier Best Western owner Ray Powell, Dean and Bev Vander Wall, Dorothy Bonnefin, and Jaque Hickman.

"Dave was the greatest thing that ever happened to the Lone Pine Film Festival," regular guest Loren Janes, a founder of the Stuntmen's Association of motion pictures said in the L.A. Times last week. " He had great enthusiasm for Lone Pine and these films."

Kerry Powell commented, "Dave was the film festival, basically. He couldn't have done it without hundreds of volunteers, but he had a lot of ideas. He put it together, and we all backed him up as best we could."

dave holland 4c.jpgChris Langley remarked, "Dave was very generous with his time, sharing his knowledge and enthusiasm with all of us. He was in his element when he was hiking up in the rocks looking for specific movie sites. Now, it is common on almost any weekend to run into film enthusiasts following in his footsteps looking for favorite movie locations."

The success of the Festival attracted the attention of Jim Rogers of Sunbelt Communications, who suggested a museum. While initial planning for the project was done by Holland, he moved to Santa Clarita in 2003 to be nearer his children. While the museum is in final construction, Dave Holland did not live to see this dream come true.

His passion for Lone Pine films and "The Alabama Rocks" will be missed by all who came in contact with him over the years. The Festival he began and the museum he dreamed about for many years will be his legacy.

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CONTACT: Chris Langley Office: 760-876-9103   Cell: 760-937-1189   Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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September 09, 2005:


Western artist John Knowlton knows western art and has captured the special local flavor of the Eastern Sierra Nevada area in many of his paintings. No painting better demonstrates this understanding than Knowlton's "Mr. Burro- Mayor of Bodie."

Knowlton has contributed this painting to the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History and the painting will be given away at the 16th annual Lone Pine Film Festival to some lucky ticket holder. Tickets for the painting can be purchased at various businesses around town, and from Film Festival volunteers now and during the Festival. All donations will be contributed to the Museum coffers to be used in its work celebrating and preserving Inyo County's rich and diverse film heritage.

The Museum will be having its building inaugural on October 6 beginning at four o'clock on the museum grounds at 701 South Main Street. The short ceremony will be followed by a cocktail party and a dinner for members. William Wellman Jr. will be the guest speaker at the dinner and will be discussing his father's work. Director Wiulliam A. Wellman directed many classic films including Wings, the first movie ever awarded an Oscar for Best picture. Wellman's first feature directorial assignment was The Man Who Won, made in Lone Pine. Yellow Sky, starring Gregory Peck, Richard Widmark and Ann Baxter was made by Wellman on location in Lone Pine in the summer of 1948. Two other Wellman films shot scenes on location locally.

John Knowlton's painting is `18 x 24 inches and would be perfect on any wall. It shows a desert landscape, two red gasoline pumps and the "Mayor" himself posed near one. Tongue-in-cheek in style, the picture captures the quiet light and long shadows of a desert afternoon.

Tickets are availablable for five dollars a piece, three for ten dollars from Film Festival personnel, at the temporary museum office, Chamber of Commerce, La Florista or by calling 760-876-9103. The winner will be selected at the Closing Campfire Sunday night of the Festival, but the winner need not be present to win.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Chris Langley
Office: 760-876-9909 Cell: 760-937-1189 
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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September 09, 2005:

The question on Highway 395, Main Street Lone Pine has changed from "When will they start the Museum?" to "Will it be finished in time for the Festival?" Mike Keith of M and L Keith Construction, overseeing the project's progress, still feels the building will be finished in time. However, a slight problem had cropped up.

The 10,500 square foot Butler Building, a gift from Beverly and Jim Rogers of Sunbelt Communications to the community of Lone Pine and Inyo County, as well as western film fans across the world, is awaiting one structural piece: the walls. Mr. Rogers fell in love with the Lone Pine Film Festival several years ago, supporting the expense of guests for a few years.

Then one Sunday after a Festival more than five years ago, he suggested, "How about we build a museum to preserve and celebrate this wonderful American film heritage." With his enthusiasm, the town rallied around. Now Lone Pine is in the final stages of completing the first stage of the project. The Rogers Building is a structurally complete building except there WERE no walls.
When the special walls, being manufactured in Nashville did not arrive, it became apparent immediately that something had gone wrong. Keith informed the Museum Board that the truck carrying the three walls for this building, along with walls for two others, lost the load from the truck trailer and all the walls were destroyed. The walls would need to be manufactured again and shipped west, a delay of three weeks.
When Mike called to check up on the walls progress, he was told to look out his office window in Victorville. The manufacturer had been encouraged to put a rush on them. The truck driver drove across the country to make a three weeks delay into a miraculous three days. The walls were there!

The fourth wall is the old western film façade with the forty-foot tower proclaiming "Film Museum" for all to see as they drive by. The sign with be soft pastel neon and two strips of neon will cross the façade to create the feeling so reminiscent of those western film theaters of the 1930's and 1940's.

After having been through so many challenges, the Board is philosophical about it. Chris Langley, Executive Director, remarked, "We have struggled through one challenge after another. We are lucky we have so many talented people dedicating time and money to the project. We feel bad when the delays could have been AVOIDED.

There will be a celebration October 6th at 4 pm at the site. "Like a Hollywood thriller, we don't know what will be there on that day. We haven't seen the last reel of the film to see how it comes out." It was will be an exciting time, with a Ceremony at four, a cocktail party following and a sit down dinner for Museum members. The guest speakers will include Paramount Producer A.C. Lyles, a Museum Board member, and William Wellman, Jr. Bill Wellman will present a preview of his book The First Best Picture being published in January which tells the story of his director father's early career including his work in Lone Pine. He will also focus on the creation of Wings, which was the first film to win a Best Film Oscar. The Museum Board invites all our neighbors to come and celebrate with us. Call 760-876-9103 for dinner tickets.

Most of all, it will be a celebration of friends and supporters and a pause before the final push to the grand opening in early 2006. Until then there will be a "soft" opening as the Board likes to call it. Visitors will be allowed in as the museum tests the 12 video viewing areas, brings the sixty seat movie house on line and fine tunes the exhibits.

Many local individuals and businesses have helped along the way. Removing the diseased trees from the lot and building the pad for the slab was a large task and Art Hickman and Dave Haas were instrumental in getting that done. Brian Webb, a member of the Museum Board has served as an architectural consultant and he has had the answers when the questions arose. Jaque Hickman has been instrumental in overseeing the project and working through the permits and engineering.

Some of the other locals who have given hours of volunteer time and shared their professional expertise include Ron Bursell, Jim Petropolis, Jan Larsen, Miller's Towing, Alan Butler, Vic Jackson and many more. "It has truly been a community project," Jaque Hickman remarked.
The Museum has begun an on-going fundraising project and several sponsors have stepped forward with major donations to continue the work of assembling a Museum from scratch, creating exhibits and adding to the collection of artifacts through acquisition.

Of course, Beverly and Jim Rogers pledge one million dollars to see the building to completion and the opening of the facility. The Dow Villa Motel is a Premier Sponsor, Kerry Powell an Associate Sponsor, Carole Freeman and Sharon McBryde Supporting sponsors. The Museum Film Buff Sponsors include Gardner's True Value, Hickman Construction, Lone Pine Drug and La Florista. The Hollywood Foreign Press contributed $9000 in the form of a grant to make the Wild West Movie Theater possible.

Information on how you or your business can become a Museum sponsor or how to become active in on-going fundraising projects as a member of the museum can be obtained by calling the offices at 760-876-9909, e-mailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or going on-line to www.museumoflonepinefilmhistory.org.

By Chris Langley, Inyo Film Commission

August 31, 2005

(Note: This is the second part of a series on the set of Bone Dry which filmed recently in Death Valley.)

As the director called again and again for retakes, the bees began to gather around the actor. He stayed in character, but concentration became more and more difficult as the bees landed on his arms and even on his face. He had joked, "I hope they aren't killer bees," but the insects were about to ruin getting the scene on film the way the director wished.hendricksen-on-location-.jpg
The star of the film is Lance Hendricksen who was doing his scene perched on the front of the monster machine overlooking Panamint. Hendricksen has a long filmography but you are most likely to remember him as the android Bishop from the film Aliens or Frank Black from the television series Millennium. He had a role in Into the West, which was on TNT a few weeks ago. The crew had laid down tracks for a dolly shot, and Director Bret Hart was riding the camera cart as Hendrickson delivered his monologue about the desert and his experiences in Desert Storm and the retreat from Baghdad.

The clapboard said "Scene 83, take one" and so it went. Director Hart reshot and reshot with feedback each time from the monitors about sound, speed of the dolly movement and focus. He knew exactly what he wanted on the screen and he was not willing to compromise even as the light began to fade over the Sierra and Lone Pine to the west.
Hendricksen has a deep resonant voice. Even though he was speaking in a quiet voice, his words carried across the silent landscape. His character had clearly suffered. There was a determined, if exhausted quality to his speech. Although this scene was in the middle of the film, it was clear that the two characters were locked in a bloody battle to the end.
In the scene, Hendricksen was to grab a canvas water bag, wet his kerchief and wipe his face and neck. The ever present make-up girl was ready to check his hair and make sure the fake scar on his forehead looked right even as he repeatedly took off his hat and wet his face in take after take.
As the shooting proceeded, the actor became wetter and wetter, a not unpleasant experience on a July afternoon near Towne's Pass. Unfortunately, yellow jackets (not bees) were slowly gathering, attracted to the moisture and finally a swarm of up to fifty were buzzing around him and landing on his sleeve and skin. The tension rose as Hendricksen began to swat away the pesky bees in between takes until he leapt off the hood, cursing the insects. I told him it was his wet shirt and the jacket he was wearing that were creating the problem. With fading light, the actor in retreat and no scene satisfactory to the director yet on film, everyone was on edge.
With a young crew of twenty-six, everyone seemed very enthusiastic on the project and ready to take on the challenges that lay ahead. Greg and Bret had both spoken glowingly of the crew. In the first few days they already proven their reliability and flexibility. They had gone about setting up for the shots framed in Bret's head, placing the equipment almost intuitively.

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They were almost ready for first rehearsals when a white SUV drove up and everyone turned to welcome second lead Luke Goss who made a very Hollywood entrance. He'd hugged and, in the case of the few women on the crew, kissed his way across the location to say hello to Director Hart, Hendricksen and other crewmembers. He wasn't filming but had just showed up to offer greetings and support. Everyone seemed to know him; perhaps no more than in a Hollywood acquaintance way, but there was a brief sense of frivolity before they got back to work.
Goss had made his mark with his band Bros in England where his debut album sold almost five million. He followed his success in music with a book called I Owe You Nothing, which went to three printings. Then he turned to acting and had success as the vampire "suckhead" Nomak in Blade 2. When he announced he had just gotten off his cell to London, everyone, but particularly Hendricksen, expressed his or her jealousy and frustration with the cell service. None of them had been able to "get out," and they were clearly feeling "cut-off" and isolated, the feeling Hart was trying to evoke in the film.
When Goss turned to drive back to the motel, several crewmembers warned him about taking the short cut off the location because of his "sissy Hollywood car." He hesitated then turned and followed the regular dirt road back to 190.
To try discouraging the bees swarming around the actor, and get the Hendricksen scene finally finished, the car was moved and the coat was removed, a breeze came up and that helped. Hendricksen took his place again and they quickly yelled "Action!" Things went better, and in the fading light, the cinematographer "ok'd" the take and Director Hart called for the crane shots. The crew had been assembling the crane and the lighting director assured the director, that if need be, he could light the scene to get it finished.
The gentle breeze at 3000 feet on the side of the valley and the waning intensity of that sun made the shoot almost comfortable. The crew and actor were getting really tired, but they were ready to stay with the director and get what he wanted on film before they wrapped for the day.
With the two mantras of filming on location repeating in my mind: "Hurry up and wait," and "Time is money," my hopes were that the little thriller film Bone Dry would further the careers of those involved and provide the audience tense entertainment.
READ PART ONE OF THIS STORY

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August 31, 2005:

"Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the noonday sun," quoted Noel Coward of an old East Indian saying. It turns out so do a young director and production group making their first feature length film. This noonday sun is the strongest too, because it is the noonday sun of Panamint and Death Valley in July.

When I arrived at the Panamint Resort, the crew and actor were just finishing lunch. It was after four o'clock. They had been shooting near Father Crowley Point and they were about to depart for the first dialogue shot on Route 190 not too far from Towne's Pass. It was hot at the resort, but this was the first real day of "film in the can" although the company had been at Stovepipe Wells for a couple of days, and were returning tomorrow to shoot at Ubehebe Crater, among other places.

Bone Dry is the story of a confrontation between two men, Jimmy and Eddie, in the desert, when they take turns as hunter and the hunted. The synopsis reads, "Within the climax, hunter and hunted come face to face when they reach their rendezvous: an open grave. The lines of justice are reversed on the audience in an unexpected twist revealed in the final flashback-predator becomes prey in the blink of an eye, for Eddie the hunted was once the hunter, a ruthless killer who annihilated Jimmy's family and left them in this very same shallow desert grave…. But Jimmy survived, crawling his way out of the desert in order to get even."
I had made friends with Greg Hughs, the producer, a few weeks before when he had contacted me for some locations in Inyo. When he arrived in town, it was late in the day and he had been on the road for several weeks. He was clearly exhausted. He had deadlines though, so I offered to drive him around. While focused on his work for the film, I soon learned his heart was back in Texas where his girl friend was waiting for him. He had plans to rendezvous with her for Memorial Day weekend: this was clearly a man in love. He wanted to use Viking Mine out towards Darwin, but the BLM refused film access until an environmental assessment could be completed, to be paid for by the production company. Greg said they had the money but not the six months time it would take.

Instead of shooting across the southwest, when I arrived on set, Greg informed me they were shooting all in California except one scene in Arizona and one in Nevada. He also introduced me to his fiancée who was working for a few days with him on the film. He told me he had proposed here because "he couldn't wait," but they had been so busy they barely had had time to celebrate.

Greg has the passion for film that the young have. Inyo County historically has been a great place for new directors and actors to cut their professional teeth. For Greg and his friends, the challenges of shooting on location in Death Valley in July were all in a day's work. I couldn't help think about the simllarities between this film and Greed so many years ago.

While Greg and I had traveled looking at locations he had talked about his years working on commercial projects and music videos in Austin Texas. His life is changing and so is the market and he is hoping not to be on the road traveling from place to place so much. When as a student Greg had written a script for the show "Growing Pains," he had been discovered by Alan Thicke The star also encouraged Greg "never to give up." With many projects and accolades to his credit, Greg now owns BIG LOOK! Productions in Austin, Texas.

Bret A. Hart is the director of Bone Dry and I had only spoken to him on the phone but he was welcoming and enthusiastic out in the valley when we met. Bret decided early on to be a director, using an 8mm camera in the sixth grade. He finished his first suspense film, a thirty minute movie entitled "The Tone Of Murder," when only a junior in high school.

Bret has continued to "pay his dues" with automobile commercial projects, karaoke videos and two short films "A Fine Line" and "Dead End" which can be viewed at his website bretahart.com. This will whet your appetite for Bone Dry. A preview of that film is available at www.bonedryfilm.com

Everyone was very proud of the car; an ominous bulky truck with "horns" on the side and art department created scars and rusted spots. A sinister grey with a deep rumble, the car reminded me of the truck in the first twenty minutes of the film Jeepers Creepers. I didn't have the heart to tell them I had seen several vehicles like it in Darwin, Keeler and the back streets of Lone Pine the last several years.

The film has the feeling of "the touch of the lizard's tail," a term a friend used once to describe the ominous and menacing feeling the desert and its isolated inhabitants can produce. Many films recently have used the "lizard's tail" and a desert setting to create a sub-genre of "noir" film style. The prop car was meant to evoke this feeling throughout this film.

When Lance Hendriksen, the star of the film, had run through his scene several times, bees began to swarm on him. As more insects gathered it looked like he might be attacked and the scene was going to be scrapped. The harshness of the desert environment had reared its head. (Next time, we will continue the story of on location with the Bone Dry crew in Death Valley.)

READ PART TWO OF THIS STORY

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August 21, 2005

An antique camera car slowly pulls a piece of movie film out of the rocky terrain of the Alabama Hills in Lone Pine. As the film unfurls frame by frame, the viewer sees one scene after another from the classic films that have been made in Inyo County over the last ninety years.

 

The panoramic picture is still in artist John Knowlton's visual imagination, but slowly he is sketching it out. The preliminary drawings will be the basis of a magnificent mural that will dominate the south wall of the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History. The mural will cover most of the one hundred foot wall and will rise nearly nine feet. The individual scenes based on actually scenes from the various movies will be created by a number of local artists as their contribution to the museum focused on the cinematic interpretations of the local western landscape.

 

John is well known in Bishop, being a main stay of the mural society there and responsible for six of the ten murals around town. He also created the mural on the Lone Pine McDonalds, which is a combination of historic local ranching and the film history that has shaped the growth of the town for eighty-five years.

 

John Knowlton has a long history with the American West about which he writes; "The American West was long considered a blank slate, a land of opportunity where cowboys could fulfill their dreams." This is where John Knowlton fulfilled his dreams.

John Knowlton is recognized for traditional westerns, plein air paintings in oils and historical murals on local walls. He spent thirty years in the live stock business after graduating from U.C. Davis and studied art as well at the California Art Institute. He has won several awards including "Cattlemen Western Artist of the Year" and C.M. Russell Quick Draw Artist. He has been published in several art magazines and his studio is located in Bakersfield.

 

Rather than merely painting the artwork for the mural and having it transferred to Mylar and mounting it on the wall, Knowlton is an advocate of it being a community project. He hopes several local artists will create and paint several of the frames of film. He also wants volunteers from the community involved with the painting so it is truly a community project. When he has worked on other murals, people have stopped by constantly to talk, critique, appreciate and finally to get their hands dirty helping paint.

 

In Bishop, people would drop by with cakes and other food. It became a social event.

 

It is the community building aspect of the project that is particularly appealing to the Museum Board. When the project is begun, everyone will be invited to drop by and take a hand in it: "no artistic experience required."

 

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Phillip Berk, Brad Pitt and Emmy Rossum

August 03, 2005:

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced recently they will partner with the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History by sponsoring the purchase of sixty new seats for the Old West Museum Movie Theater being constructed as part of the Museum building.

 

In a letter dated July 7, 2005 from president Phillip Berk, the HFPA announced, "On behalf of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, it gives me great pleasure to inform you that we have approved a grant for $8,940 to purchase seating for the newly constructed 'Old West Museum Movie Theater' which is part of the museum of film history preserving this region's history as one of Hollywood's principle locales for shooting western movies."

 

The check was presented to Dorothy Bonnefin and Bonnie McCarthy who represented Lone Pine at the star-studded luncheon held July 20th at the Beverly Hills Hotel. The Museum was in a group of grant recipients of some note. Brad Pitt accepted a check on behalf of The Film Foundation, Sally Field on behalf of Sundance Institute, and Kevin Bacon on behalf of Independent Feature Project, New York. Interestingly, all the actors had worked in Lone Pine at some point during their careers.

 

 

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Peter Falk

Peter Falk was kind enough to represent Lone Pine Film Festival, Los Angeles Conservancy, California State Summer School and the Latin-American Cinemateca of Los Angeles on the stage. Mr. Falk worked in Lone Pine on The Great Race and a Wagon Train episode entitled "The Gus Morgan Story."

The HFPA gave more than $1 million dollars to twenty-seven film schools and non-profit organizations. "Members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association always look forward to our annual summer luncheon," said Berk. "Not only do we celebrate the installment of the organizations' new officers and board members, we take pride in donating over $1,000,000 in charitable contributions to many outstanding film related charities and educational institutions. We are fortunate that the success of the Golden Globes allows us to do so."

 

Joel A. Goodman, small movie theater and home theater consultant, has designed a package of projection and sound equipment that will make the theater state-of-the-art. While most of the projection will be done digitally, the theater will have a small performance area for music and panel discussions, as well as educational lectures for an intimate audience of about sixty.

 

Eventually the theater interior will be decorated with interesting murals, art and fixtures from old time theaters that will carry on the theme of the museum façade.

 

Additional information about the theater, rental of the facility or other information can be obtained by calling 760-876-9909 or emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

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MTV Italy's Giorgia and Alessandro

July 14, 2005

The towering clouds of dust were rising by sunrise. By ten am when the three car caravan containing the MTV Italy production crew and television hosts was scheduled to pull into Lone Pine, the Inyo and Sierra Nevada Mountains were obscured by dust. The wind was pushing the small gritty particles into your eyes and mouth whenever you tried to speak. Not a great time to present the landscapes that have attracted film companies since 1920, but the show must go on.

 

The two video disc jockeys came only with first names: Giorgia and Alessandro. She had beautiful, delicate features under the straw cowboy hat and a figure to match. He was similar dressed in the latest youth fashions, even to the tops of his boxer shorts showing over his baggy pants.

 

The producer of the show took me aside to let me know they were big stars in the Italian youth market. After all they were on MTV Italy, the television channel with the largest youth audience there. Giorgia had been a successful model, then after an appearance on JTV, a talent scout had discovered her. She now was an established star on MTV, having just left TLR after four years to try a new program called "Absolutely 90's."

 

 

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Alessandro posing in the Red Car

Alessandro was newer to the MTV fans, having moved from ALL MUSIC to MTV recently. Before that he had established himself as the Italian Ju Jitsu champion and a successful soccer athlete.

 

Today they were all business, but off camera they lacked any star pretensions. It was a small crew: producer, director, writer, cameraman, make-up; and a couple of liaison workers. Some spoke fluent English, but most didn't.

 

When American Locations Manager Dawn Dennis called me a few weeks before, she had explained MTV Italy was producing a travel show based on the adventures of two young stars, who happened to be traveling together through the American West in a red convertible with flame decals.

 

The show would contain about twenty minutes of their travels interlaced with the latest music videos. The hour long shows had been developed for at least thirty-two episodes, and they wanted to do the west, working out of Las Vegas. They wanted to branch out, and she had arranged for them to go to places like the Grand Canyon. They wanted to come to the real west, the Owens Valley.

 

I told her that besides Death Valley and the historic film region of the Alabamas, the timing was right for the Mule Days weekend. We developed that idea and she was enthusiastic, but it was not to be because the Italian production company was delayed in Italy.

 

It looked like they wouldn't make it even to Death Valley because they had trouble contacting Dave Rinehart, the ranger in charge of movie permits. Then came the call. They wanted to spend a few hours in Lone Pine the next day after visiting the Death Valley sand dunes, Bad Water and Ubehebe Crater. "Do you mind speaking on camera?" I immediately thought this would give a great boost to my budding MTV career, so I said I was ready and willing.

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Giorgia and Alessandro were the epitome of professionals as they would come alive before the camera. Their enthusiasm and glibness made me want to join in, but my Italian was non-existent. Then they would turn to me speaking in English and we were off and running. The conversation would swing from English to Italian and back again, as they made my discussion of the film history that stretches for eighty-five years palatable to people who think Gladiator marks the beginning of the story.

 

The next day brought the worst dust storm I can remember in the last few years, and it was difficult to talk about the movie landscapes that you couldn't see, but we managed. The creative group would talk through the scene, the dialogue and the "blocking" of the action, all in Italian. Then just before filming, they would gesture me onto the set with Giorgia and Alessandro and we would film.

 

It was when we came to John Wayne's room in the Dow Villa, the one he occupied during his last appearance in Lone Pine, that their enthusiasm seemed greatest. It turned out to be his last appearance before a camera, for a Great Western bank ad. Owner Lynne Bunn had filled me in about the details, which I was able to retell for my new pals on camera, even adding the hint of a ghost, if I recall correctly.

 

Then we were filmed with me introducing the two hosts to the Totem and Indian Trading Post with its autographed walls. Alessandro was driving down Main Street and Marco the cameraman was perched on the back of the red convertible while we discussed the high points. The wind and dust were whipping around. The production's writer was dying to see a tumbleweed, but that day all we had were the sweeping clouds of dust. Still, everyone was very pleased with the atmosphere of the Old West we had blowing by. I can hardly wait for my first request for an autograph from my new Italian fans.

 

Still from Fighting Fury

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February 06, 2005:

Just when we think we're nearing the end of the list we find four more films that can be added to the list of films with scenes shot in Lone Pine. Some of these have been identified through stills others through stories discovered in the archives of the local paper, the Inyo Independent.

 

We just saw a still on eBay for a Jack Hoxie film called Fighting Fury. Packy Smith bought the still for his collection but he will share it with the archives of the Museum. The film was released on August 24 1924 and the still clearly shows Hoxie in front of the Alabamas and the Sierra and it is clearly labeled with a snipe on the back. We keep adding to our Hoxie list and in all likelihood, there are still more Hoxie films with Lone Pine locations to be identified. If only more of them still existed.

 

The second film we have added to the list is called The Eagle's feather and it was released in 1923. The still comes from a Film Fun magazine at the time of release and show the film company in a pasture with an erosion bank behind. The pictures is not the best but appears to be located north of Lone Pine in Manzanar looking south with the Alabama Hills appearing as a blurry mound and the Sierra to the right. We are now searching for other stills or material from this film that will prove once and for all it was shot near Lone Pine. It starred Mary Alden and James Kirkwood, who for a long time worked as a well know director before he went to acting as his directing jobs dried up. He directed several Mary Pickford films but went on in later years to work in several Lone Pine films as a character actor including The Untamed Breed (1948), The Nevadan (1949), Stage to Tucson (1950), Man in the Saddle (1951) and The Last Posse (1953). Anyone who has stills in their collection, please check them to see if we can be sure of this identification.

 

 

Still from The Eagle's Feather

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We found a still at Danny Schwartz wonderful shop from a 1928 Universal Picture starring Fred Humes called Arizona Cyclone that is clearly Lone Pine. In fact, if you walk straight back from the Museum site on Hopalong Cassidy Lane to the DWP leases, you will find the location, maybe even the tree, now a tortured dead stump in the still. That location is what is called The Old Place where filming began in Lone Pine in the 1920's on the land used by Russ Spainhower and family before they purchased what is now the Anchor Ranch, just south of there. The film was directed by Edgar Lewis and starred George B. French and Margaret Grey as well.

 

The final film is Sundown Jim (1942) starring John Kimbrough. It was the same year as his other film Lone Star Ranger. While prints of the second film exist they are rare. We would like to show it at a Festival if we could locate it as several scenes were shot on the streets of Lone Pine it has been reported. The Independent carried a story o0n January 9, 1942 that Fox was in town making the picture. The articles stated, "More than 75 members of the 20th century Fox studios arrived in Lone Pine Monday morning to begin location work on Sundown Jim, a semi-western picture starring John Kimbrough, former all-American football star."

 

At the time the company expected to be in the Alabama Hills about a week according to the director James Tinling. Interestingly, the article concluded, "Sunday several in the cast shot pictures on a humor short entitled "Ski Whiz" taken on the Palisade Ski slopes near Big Pine.

 

Again if any collector can find a copy of Sundown Jim or stills from it, we would appreciate hearing from them.

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View of Museum Facade

February 05, 2005:

Lone Pine will be a hub of activity the first weekend of October when the town's citizens and out-of-town fans open their Film History Museum That event will be followed by the sixteenth film festival celebrating Inyo County's long movie history.

 

The grand opening of the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History will take place the afternoon of October 6th with various guests, dignitaries and celebrities in attendance. The celebration will continue into the evening with a dinner and then will dovetail into the annual three-day celebration of western heritage, films and fun in a small town. The event has gained worldwide notoriety and has become the premier western film festival. Recently, "western life style" has attained noteworthy popularity in Europe.

 

Final negotiations and contract signing are now complete with M and L Keith in Victorville to provide the ten thousand five hundred square foot Butler building which will house the film history collection and exhibits, as well as a museum store and movie theatre. Beverly and Jim Rogers of Sunbelt Communications have championed the project from the beginning, supporting the Festival and then the concept of the Museum with enthusiasm and financial sponsorship. Mr., Rogers guaranteed one million dollars if the building was completed by October 1st, an opportunity for the small town that is too good to be passed up.

 

In a meeting on Wednesday, February 2 in Las Vegas, Mr. Rogers signed off on the plan presented by the Building Committee. Representatives there from Lone Pine were Jaque Hickman, Brian Webb, Chris Langley, Lynne Bunn, Dave Haas, and Acquisitions Director and exhibit designer Bill Hunter. The first check has been cut and sent to M and L Keith to purchase the building components.

 

Clearly that makes for a very challenging timeline. Present plans call for site preparation in March to be accomplished by Hickman Construction and various local subcontractors. Building elements arrive on site April 1 and the building will be finished by September 1st. That allows for two months of exhibit installation and a "soft" or test opening before the big day. The timeline is based on no significant delays during construction.

 

"It's a challenge, but our local and non-resident volunteers, fans and enthusiasts are definitely ready. Support has been growing continually for the Museum since we raised over three hundred thousand dollars to purchase the land and create a reserve fund to support initial operating expenses," Chris Langley, Executive Director of the Museum explained. "I guess I like to think of it as an old time barn raising but with all the complications of life our times have placed on us."

 

The inspiration has always been the diverse and rich film history of Lone Pine and Inyo County. The group of volunteers have worked year round to create the Festival. This year's edition of the Festival will have "Our Cowboy Heroes and Their Horses" as its theme and will feature Tom Mix and his horse Tony on the button. Mix and Tony worked here several times; with the first film starring Tony called simply Just Tony in 1923. Jack Hoxie actually found Scout on a ranch here and Roy Rogers "met" Trigger in Lone Pine.

 

Petrine Mitchum who will soon publish a book on the subject will be a guest premiering her book at the Festival. Petrine is the daughter of Robert Mitchum who rode Steel here in West of the Pecos. The Festival will have many of its old favorites with new events penciled in as well. The very popular Geology Tour will be expanded and a tour combining science fiction film locations with the birds of Owens Lake will be added and led by local authority Mike Prather.

 

The Friday night concert will feature recording star Belinda Gail and Curley Musgrave.

 

Because of the extended combination of the Museum opening and the Festival, many more volunteers will be needed. "Clearly we will need lots of very practical help in the crunch time of September to get the exhibits up and functioning. Construction of the exhibits will begin in May, but you know we will need painters, and crafts people to get everything done. Remember those old Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney films? 'My Dad has a barn, let's put on the show!' That's our group. It will be fun and a little crazy getting ready," Langley enthused.

 

The Museum will have seventy-five hundred feet of exhibition space with exhibits celebrating the heroes, the films, the locations and critical issues concerning the films as cultural artifacts. The museum façade is based on an actual 1930's western movie theatre in Montana. It will have a forty-foot art deco tower, a lobby area and large faux movie posters down both flanks that will advertise exhibits and events inside.

 

However, the Museum will not just tell a western film history story of bygone days. Exhibits will also include the car from High Sierra, graboid worms from Tremors, and the gate to Paradise from Star Trek 5 The Final Frontier. The Museum and Film Festival Board are planning other events and fundraisers during the year including the annual Concert and Dinner in the Rocks on June 11.

 

January 19, 2005:

There is nothing like coming to where the action is, in rock climbing as well as film and video. So when Mike Strassman relocated his video business from Mammoth to a house in the Alabama Hills, it made perfect sense.

 

Strassman is one of those technical experts with specific film resumes that make filming in Inyo County attractive for film companies coming on location. It is not only the varied locations, predominantly sunny days, and inexpensive permitting. Inyo County also has a small cadre of experienced people to make filming here successful.

 

strassman-in-studios.jpgFor Mike, several of his interests come together near Lone Pine. Not only is he trained in film making, but he is a climber and author who published A Rockclimber's Guide to the Alabama Hills in 2002. Film Festival personnel gave movie names to specific geologic formation like the Hoppy Rocks, Cattle Pocket and Gunga Din Bridge to identify movies that shot scenes there. Strassman has give evocative climbing names to many areas of the Alabamas. In his book he gives specific instruction how to ascend The Poodle Wall, The Eye of Horus and Schamaltz/ Friday the 13th.

 

 

Born in 1959, Mike is the son of a Beverly Hills psychiatrist, but spent his youth in Illinois where his father took a teaching position. He attended high school in Winnetka where he became involved with a fully equipped studio on the campus. Eventually his path through life led to the UCLA Film School, but when employment beckoned to work in Mammoth, he jumped at the chance. There he was shooting footage for Bennett Kessler and working at the local television station, but he wanted to go in new directions.

 

 

 

Doug Robinson, the owner of Patagonia, put up $30,000 and Mike's first video Moving Across Stone was created. It was an instant success. Mike formed Range of Light Productions in 1986. At present Strassman offers ten videos for sale on his website. Some of the titles include Bullet, Groms, Know Limits, Victims of Gravity and Kamikaze-10 Year Anniversary. As Mike admits, life was pretty good. He was an independent producer, living in the mountains having achieved his goal at the age of 26.

 

Having accumulated a library of marvelous footage of skiing, snowboarding and extreme sports, his business expanded to stock footage for programs like Real TV. "By the 1990's Mammoth was the extreme sports capital of the world" Strassman offers. But it went from sports to "eye candy" as Mike calls it, and they wanted more and more violent footage, to the point where the audience (and thus the producers) were calling for real blood.

 

Then the demand other stock footage collapsed and so did business for Mike.

 

Mike was drawn to the Alabamas. He would spend more and more time pioneering routes up the various climbing rocks and formations. This led Mike to help sponsor the first climbing festival a year ago. Recently he founded Friends of the Alabama Hills, a group that includes all the stakeholders and parties of interest for the area. The Organization works to keep the Alabamas in its primitive state, while not excluding anyone who wants appropriate access to this unique spot. As Mike stated in a recent press release, "The Friends re-iterated their commitment to preservation of existing uses in the Hills; be it grazing, OHV use on trails or target shooting. It is not the intent of the friends of the Alabama Hills to advocate the elimination of any current activities, but educate users to what is appropriate in keeping the hills a semi-primitive area that everyone can enjoy."

 

 

 

strassman-on-top-of-boulder.jpgRange of Light Productions here in Lone Pine offers many production services where production companies need them. Services include graphic design, tape dubs, voice-over sessions, editing, sound recording, screening room, on-line editing; the list goes on and on. Mike also is an experienced mountain rigger and has already worked with National Geographic up at Walt's Point in his new location.

 

Behind Mike's house there are typically large Alabama Hills boulders and somehow he talked me into free climbing them. I thought it was a bad idea, but Mike is the kind of instructor who supports and coaches you to do something you think you might be able to do, but are not sure. So there I was up above and behind his studio with the beautiful Owens Valley before me. I felt very accomplished, if stiff and sore, the next day.

 

I had experienced first hand another one of Mike's skills. Filmmakers on location are lucky to have Mike Strassman to depend upon here in Inyo County.

 

(This is the first of a series of occasional articles on the professionals who work with the film industry on location here in Inyo County.)

 

 

 

The Lone Pine Film Festival bought its annual table at the Golden Boot Award, held this year at the Universal Sheraton. Festival Director Dorothy Bonnefin and her daughter Donna, and President Chris Langley and his wife Sandy entertained several friends of the Festival at the evening event. House Peters Jr. and his wife Lucy sat at the table. House attended the Festival two years ago. He told us that night he was the original MR. CLEAN! one among his many other roles.

 

 

 

a.c.-lyles.jpgWoody Wise who oversees much of the digital projection at the Festival, locate DVD and vhs vesions of rare films was at our table with his wife Sandy as well. The Golden Boots wentdorothy-and-house-peters-jr.jpg to Val Kilmer, Scott Glenn, Robert Horton, Pat Hingle and Randy Quaid among others. Presenters included Fess Parker, Sydney Poitier and Robert Osborne to name a few.

 

The night before members of the Festival group attended the "Pre-Boot" Party put on by Jim Roberts at the Sportsman Lodge. We got to say hello to Dave Holland, Loren Janes, Mark Bedor, A.C. Lyles and Neil Summers there. Jerry Rosenthal, owner of Sagebrush Entertainment, told us about a 35mm nitrate print of stock footage of Lone Pine shot for Hopalong Cassidy films. He gave it to Packy Smith and it will be converted into digi-beta format perhaps to be shown at the Festival this Fall. Jerry promised we would see him once again at the Festival and was excited about the progress being made on the museum.sandy-and-woody-wisejpg.jpg

 

 

 

Dave Snowden told us of many gifts to the museum from Burt Kennedy's estate and Dave's own collection including scripts, posters and personal items. He said that there would be several items from old friend Pierce Leyden's estate as well. Al Frisch told us he was donating the Hopalong Cassidy holsters from the first two films. He hopes to be able to film a few scenes in Lone Pine soon.two-sandys.jpg

 

All in all, it was a fun and productive weekend for Lone Pine.

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August 14, 2004

What is it they say in the movies? "Cut. That's a take! Print it!" The Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History has reached that stage after several years of fundraising, planning, designs, exhibit research and collection gathering. The Building Committee has been given the go ahead to locate a contractor and complete the permitting process to begin construction.

On Tuesday, July 20th group of Lone Pine residents met with Mr. Rogers at his offices in Las Vegas to present their proposal, exhibit designs, floor plans and model for the Museum. The representatives included Jaque Hickman, co-director of the project, architect Brian Webb, Advisory Board member Beverly Vanderwall and Museum Executive Director Chris Langley.

"From our perspective, it was a very successful meeting, " Hickman remarked enthusiastically. "We and the community have worked very hard on this project. It is wonderful to finally reach the point where we will have something tangible to show everyone." She continued, "The Museum will be a great addition to our area and a boon to the entire community in terms of attracting tourism here." The first step will be to move temporary offices and a construction office onto the site as soon as possible.

Jim and Beverly Rogers of Sunbelt Communications, a company that operates several NBC Television affiliates across the west had promised, when all the initial planning and work was completed by Lone Pine, to build a museum that celebrated and preserved the community's film history.

The Film Festival Board, which has lead the organization through fourteen festivals, during which the event has grown in stature and reputation, embraced the idea of a museum. Kerry Powell and Dave Holland had met with Jim Rogers after one such event at his request. They listened while Jim told of his vision for a museum that would preserve the film history that the Festival celebrated each year. Then Jim volunteered to donate the funds for the building and the process began.

Like most complex yet worthwhile projects, the challenges have been many, the learning curve for the local board steep, and a lot of volunteer hours of work expended to get to this stage. Each time a deadline was set, many obstacles appeared and progress lagged, much to everyone's disappointment.

Procuring the land required $229,000 fundraising and the cooperation of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power as well as the help of Rene Mendez and the Inyo Board of Supervisors to accomplish. The Museum Board raised an additional $100,000, established an Acquisitions account, and worked diligently to make certain the museum was based in sound business practices.

Jim Rogers, along with the Lone Pine Board of Directors members, have persisted and on Tuesday a group of local residents met with Jim at his offices in Las Vegas. Mr. Rogers has recently become the chancellor of the University of Nevada Reno Campus, adding one more worthwhile project to his already full plate.

Sunbelt Communications hired Bill Hunter to aid in collections acquisition and Bill has been working with Chris Langley, Executive Director of the Museum, and the entire Film Festival crew to create exhibits and plan the exhibition space. Bill is a graphic artist and a very active volunteer with the Golden Boot Fundraising Event, another of Jim Rogers' charitable activities.

The group presented all the plans, including a floor plan model of the museum to Mr. Rogers. After asking about the placement of the movie stagecoach which he bought for the museum, he expressed his enthusiasm for all the work that had been done and said he wanted the Museum group to proceed immediately to construction for an eight thousand square foot exhibit space.

During the meeting Rogers called one contractor with whom he had done several projects. The group spoke with him on speakerphone. Rogers also offered his collection of western artifacts, movie memorabilia, guns and costumes on a rotating loan basis to be used in the museum exhibits.

joy-anderson-and-belt2.jpgAugust 08, 2004:

Joy Anderson of Lone Pine, daughter of Russ Spainhower who worked with so many early films in Lone Pine, recently presented the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History with a very special gift, a belt used by Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle here in his first feature film, The Round Up.

Film historians are certain that filming began in Lone Pine in 1919 although it appears movie companies had been coming to Inyo County for a few years before.

The Fatty Arbuckle feature film The Round Up began work on the streets and hills around Lone Pine in December of 1919 and finished at the end of January 1920. The belt present by Mrs. Anderson is tooled leather and quite wide with patterns of flowers worked into the pattern. She received the belt from her mother Jean who identified it as one used by Arbuckle. Although Russ Spainhower was in town at the time, Joy thinks someone else actually served as liaison for the movie company locally. There are several candid shots of the star working in Lone Pine in the family album however.

The town newspaper at the time stated on January 3, 1920 " The Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle Motion Picture Company is in Lone Pine where big preparations are underway for the production of pictures. The hotel and lodging house accommodations in Lone Pine will be taxed to their utmost when all the company shall have arrived."

One of the great pieces of film history luck is that the film has survived in a 16 mm negative held at the Library of Congress Film Archive. A print was struck from this negative, funded by Jim Rogers of Sunbelt Communications and it well be screened during the Festival this coming October. An actual 35 mm, tinted nitrate copy was at the UCLA Archive twenty years ago, but it decomposed before it could be restored, an expensive process. This is why preservation of our film heritage is a job that cannot wait.

The film was actually screened on its first run at the end of 1920 in the Independence Theater at Christmas time. Expecting a large crowd of interested local residents, the theater had scheduled two showings at 7 pm and 8:30.

The local newspaper was enthusiastic in its praise of the film. "The Roundup is best described as six reels of undiluted laughs and hair raising thrills, for it shows the corpulent comedian in comedy situations that characterized his former short funfests, as well as dramatic portrayer extraordinary." 

The film was based on a famous stage play that was actually turned into a novel before the film was made. The Museum owns a copy of the original novel by the same name published in 1905. It uses the standby plot of two pals in love with the same gal. The reporter explains further, "How one man double-crosses his chum, and married the girl, then seeks to atone for his misdeeds, forms the theme of the story."

Arbuckle's character is named William Henry Harrington Hoover, better known as "Slim," the sheriff. Tom Forman, Wallace Beery, Irving Cummings and Mabel Julienne Scott are in the supporting cast. Tom Forman would return three years later to direct The Virginian screened recently at the Mt. Whitney Film Fest. He also has ranch outside of Bishop and many friends in the valley.

Clarence Badger would have known Fatty Arbuckle well since both of them worked at the Keystone Studios under Mack Sennett and since Badger bought property in the area as early as 1917, he probably was the one who encouraged the film company to come to Lone Pine for most of the location work on this movie.

The Arbuckle belt will be on display in the silent film section of the Museum when it opens next year.

highsierra.gifJuly 07, 2004:

As part of the Mt. Whitney Trail Centennial celebration the Lone Pine Film Festival will be screening films that contain scenes either made at the Portals or in the high country around Mt. Whitney. The evnt will take place on July 17th and 18th and the films will be shown in the Lone Pine High School Auditorium free of charge.

 

"We think this event is an important part of our local culture and economy, and the Film Festival wanted to contribute its part to the celebration," commented Chris Langley, President of the Festival. "We had a surprising number of films to choose from and we had a difficult time narrowing the field to some very representative films from the different genres."

 

The history of filming goes back to the 1923 production of The Virginian, which just happens to survive in a very respectable version. Much of the film was made in the high country of the area. Another silent film is Tom Mix's 1925 version of The Riders of the Purple Sage, which filmed extensively at the edge of the mountains and at the falls at the Whitney Portals.

 

There will also be several documentaries shown as well. The popular Counting Sheep about the program to balance the big horn sheep and mountain lion populations which proved so popular among local audiences in February will be screened, as well as a premier of a film called 5 Million Footsteps, which tells the story John Muir's Whitney ascent. The biography covers his environmental work while several filmmakers and biologists duplicate the route Muir followed. The film is so new it was actually being edited at press time.

 

Huell Howser's documentary about the reenactment of the Wedding of the Waters describes the famous 1937 event and has many local Southern Inyo personalities shown. Included in the film are Bill Michaels, Joy Anderson, Mrs. Grace (Hopalong Cassidy) Boyd, Myron Alexander and Ray Powell to name a few.

Mike Straussman who wrote the book on bouldering in the Alabamas has contributed to shorts on Climbing Mt. Whitney he originally made for the Outdoor Channel. One piece is has a historical viewpoint while the other pictures a fourteen year old boy's attempt to pioneer a new route up the challenging east face.

 

Of course, no film festival of Mt. Whitney films would be complete without High Sierra, the hallmark film being shown Saturday night, preceded by the remake I Died a Thousand Times that starred Jack Palance and Shelly Winters. They make an interesting study of two films that reflect somewhat different periods in our country's culture.

 

The Festival will also show a television episode of Have Gun Will Travel and Man in the Saddle, a remarkable film starring Randolph Scott, which has a spectacular fight, staged on the frozen Portal's waterfall with three actors slipping and tumbling down the frozen water. The Festival closes with Brigham Young, Frontiersman starring Tyrone Power.

 

"We are excited by the diversity of the program, and without the help of Woody Wise who is supplying the equipment and technical expertise it wouldn't be happening for free. Local sound man Butch Berry will be using his own sound system for the weekend as well." Langley concluded. "There is truly something for every interest being shown. Everyone is invited and it is all free!"

 

The Lone Pine Chamber has information - Phone: 760-876-4444

COWBOY POET DOCUMENTARY, "Owen Badgett, The Gypsy Cowman",
A documentary about a cowboy poet who lives and works on a ranch in Eastern Montana.

Owen Badgett...The Gypsy Cowman tells the tale of Badgett, who, like his father before him, runs his herd of cattle on land he does not own. As the guide through the documentary, Badgett takes viewers on a journey back to a time that has been easily forgotten by many. He lives without electricity, he takes a 33-hour one-way bus ride once a year to visit friends in California, his horse is his best friend, and his word is his bond.To celebrate life as he knows it, Badgett has written and self-published three books of his poetry and stories, which have been enjoyed by many across the country. Badgett has appeared at a number of cowboy poetry gatherings, including Elko, Nevada; Lewiston, Montana; Salinas, Ridgecrest and Lone Pine, "The 'Gypsy Cowman' is a tribute to those who helped establish the West as an integral part of America's cultural heritage and to those who carry on those values today,"

Owen Badgett...The Gypsy Cowman was produced by Linda Lou Crosby with the support and encouragement  from the Lone Pine Film Festival Foundation and funding from the LEF Foundation. LEF is a private foundation that supports the creation and presentation of contemporary work in the visual and performing arts fields. Through its activities and programming, LEF funds projects of creative merit, cultural resonance, and timeliness. LEF's efforts reflect a belief in the value of experimentation and in the important role that art and its practice hold in society.

Click Here to listen to Radio Interview with Linda Crosy and Owen

Rick Huff reviews Western music and cowboy poetry releases in his "Rick Huff's Best of the West Reviews" column in Rope Burns,The Western Way from the Western Music Association, the Backforty Bunkhouse Newsletter, CowboyLegacy.org and at CowboyPoetry.com. Read Rick's  review that appeared on cowboypoetry.com and The Western Way magazine….really great  @: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/rickhuffreviews4.htm#gypsy

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Click here to Order your copy....

"The Gypsy Cowman is an intimate story packed with moving interviews and captivating footage that will preserve and promote the heritage of the American West," said Chris Langley, executive director of The Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History.

June 19, 2004:

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By Chris Langley, Inyo County Film Commission

A unique film presents an instructive opportunity to understand creativity in human imagination. While great Hollywood classics might first spring to mind, the film Tremors has gained in popularity since it was filmed in Lone Pine and presents an interesting study. It spawned two sequels, one prequel and a television series. Nancy Roberts, one of the producers and creative minds behind the franchise, called recently to let me know she and her partners had finally retired the series, that she had moved to Kanab, Utah and was pursuing other film projects.

Now is a good time to reflect back on the creative origins of the film. Producer and "mother" of Tremors Nancy Roberts, director Ron Underwood and writer-producer-director of the sequels, Steve Wilson attended the 13th Film Festival and I had an opportunity to explore with them how the movie came to be made.

Originally, Nancy was the talent agent for Steve and his partner Brent Maddux However, she functioned more as a "producer," in Steve's words, in getting the film pitched, written and "greenlighted." ("Greenlighted" means getting permission from the executives to go ahead with filming the project.)

Explaining her passion for the project, Nancy told me "What appealed to me is that I love westerns and it is basically a western, a horror western. It takes place in the daytime. It is not murky, it is not aliens, not atmospheric in the classic horror genre." I remember during filming that one of the production people told me that the challenge was to do Jaws in the daylight. He had said that the film would be as effective and scary as the creatures. He called it "Jaws in the desert."

Nancy had continued by citing the writing of the characters by Steve and Brent. "I loved the people. I thought the people were real people, every day people who were faced with an extraordinary situation. They used real tools to solve their problems by using their wits. I think that might be why the sophisticated executives took so long to get it. They used different methods of solving problems."

I asked Steve specifically about how he had come up with the original idea. He explained, "The original scrap of paper was written while I worked down at the China Lake Naval base as a film editor, one of my first jobs. I was hiking out there. I had been aware of the ant lions. There are a lot right here in town. They make cone shaped holes in sand. When an ant comes by they flick dirt up and the ant is sucked under.

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"I happened to watch this happen. I was hiking on some big rocks, similar to but not as cool as the ones up here in the Alabama Hills. I just jotted a note down, 'Gee what would happen if I was under the sand and I couldn't get off of this rock.'" The basic premise of the film was born.

Steve continued, "That note sat in a file folder for five or six years till we sold Short Circuit." At that point Nancy had asked the writing team to come in with ten of the their favorite ideas. They had worked on the idea, got the characters established, focusing on two "ne'er-do-well" characters. Usually they would be eaten in a horror picture by the end of the first reel, but the creative idea was to turn them into the heroes of the piece.

"When we pitched it to Nancy she said "oh, land sharks." We never called it that but she did. Then Saturday Night Live did a skit called that. It was a long time before we came up with the name 'graboid.' We had as much trouble coming up with that name as the characters in the movie."

When Nancy had called me, she also had wonderful news for the Lone Pine Film History Museum now in final design stages. I had told her that weekend that at some future time, should the opportunity present itself, I would love to have one of the graboids, as they are called, for the museum. She told me that during the call that she had procured from Universal the "bursting head graboid" from the first film that appeared in all the others, and we could have it for the museum. It is fourteen feet of delicate latex, but it will spend the rest of its days in Lone Pine. She also got the miniature of Chang's store used in the special effects for the last movie, and told us we could also have her own personal mounted specimen of a "shreiker" from the second movie. Other props and memorabilia are pending.

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February 34, 2004:

The premier screenings of the documentary Counting Sheep in Inyo County and Mammoth sponsored by the Lone Pine Film Festival are now history. Clearly the response indicates the film’s subject concerning the balancing of two populations of important animals in their natural habitat struck a cord in the local audiences as every screening was sold out and additional screenings had to be offered. Word of mouth has been strong on the quality of the film.

The screenings were held because the Lone Pine personnel of the Festival felt people would be interested in the film and because the film had been made on a shoestring budget and still had remaining debt. Producer, director and cinematographer Frank Green and Chris Langley, president of the Festival, had set an optimistic goal of having GreenTV of San Francisco walk away with $2000 to put towards the final edit and marketing of the film.

Frank Green stated recently that the gross receipts from ticket sales and sales of the vhs and dvd copies of the film exceeded $11,000. Much of that will be profit as the biggest expense for the showings was the rental of the “state of the art” rear view projection system. The cost of that was covered by sponsorship from Wilson’s Sports and Mountain Light Gallery in Bishop and by the Film Festival Board in Lone Pine.

Green summed it up, “It goes without saying I’m flabbergasted by this income. Far beyond my wildest expectations. Profound, heartfelt thanks.”

A great deal of interest has been shown in future showings of the film for all those who missed it. There have been numerous inquires where the film can be purchased. Although discounted at the original screenings, the film is available at Spellbinder Books in Bishop and soon at the Interagency Visitor’s Center and the Drug Store in Lone Pine. It can also be purchased by calling GreenTV at 415 255 4797 or visiting their website at www.Greentv.org.

The Lone Pine Film Festival wants to sponsor inexpensive events for the local residents as well as the fundraising events it needs to do to survive financial. The Festival and its parent organization the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History also intends, when possible, to champion and support little films which need “adoption” to exist. Obviously, local audiences are willing to help.

With the new income, Frank Green intends to do some additional editing and “tweaking” of the film. He hopes to get a “name” actress to do the narration for the film to improve its marketability. The film remains a full-time project for him for the time being.

Future screenings in Independence and Ridgecrest are being discussed. Counting Sheep will also screen Sunday morning of the Film Festival, October 12th as part of a series of nature documentaries all made locally. Other possible films, on the environmental impact of the DWP’s Owens Lake Project, are either shooting now or in the final stages of editing.

The Festival has already seen and accepted a second film entitled 5 Million Footsteps, directed by Jay Chapman, which will screen as part of this nature documentary “mini-festival”in October. This documentary tells the story of John Muir and his work against the story of his ascent of Mt. Whitney which is being reenacted in the film by a group of environmentalists and filmmakers. The modern ascent is de[icted as the story of Muir’s experiences are retold. Again, this film has still not found a home and was written and produced as the first of a series on the history of the environmental movement in the U.S. Other films are pending.

The Festival is now exploring bringing several short films made at the Camp site and about the Manzanar experience “on tour,” in conjunction with the Park store and the Inyo Council for the Arts. Stay tuned for announcements.

January 06, 2004:

Lone Pine's town sign used to say "Little Town, Lots of Charms." Men's Health magazine called it one of the fifty Healthiest Towns last year. Then Lone Pine was one of the one hundred "2003 Tourist Destinations" of the American Bus Association.

Now Lone Pine has earned the title of one of the "West's 100 Most Western Towns." The cowboy bars, western films, ranches and sauntering cowboys have given the town an official new definition. Undoubtedly, the Lone Pine Film Festival has helped. Of course, Lone Pine has always worn its western traditions proudly. We didn't need a magazine to tell us that.

The magazine, True West, made the selection to include Lone Pine in its April 2004 Travel issue. We will have to wait to see what they have to say about the town.

This is not the first time the magazine which says it is "celebrating the American west," has awarded Lone Pine as part of a "best" before. In the December 2003 50th Anniversary Issue, Best of the West section, the magazine editors chose as the best "Scenic Road Trip Under 500 Miles" Yosemite National Park to Lone Pine, California. Anyone who has driven that trip would probably agree.

The editors wrote, "The drive from Yosemite Village alongside the Merced River will have you craning your neck as you attempt to take in the towering granite walls that define Yosemite Valley." The story continues, "Once on U.S. 395, heading south toward Lone Pine, you'll think you're in Switzerland as you gaze at the Sierra Nevada Mountains rugged eastern escarpment."

The magazine has already explained how they choose their most western towns. "We started with the town whose links to western history are so strong, they could pave over Boot Hill and still belong on the list. None have, of course, because they honor and respect their heritage. Many capitalize on their history for the benefit of new generations…. When we talk Western towns, we mean places that are proud of the title."

badgerhouse.jpgLone Pine, California December 31, 2003: The images danced a bit, not because the people were having fun in the snow, but because the sprockets of the old 35 mm nitrate film were brittle, the film a bit shrunken. Jere Guldin of the UCLA Film Archive was leaning in over my shoulder getting joy from the images that he had worked so laboriously to retrieve from the reels of deteriorating film.

Next to me sat David Stenn, author of biographies on Jean Harlow and Clara Bow, through whose persistence what we were viewing was retrieved from the masses of film. He would exclaim, "That's Leatrice Joy in that group! Her hair is shorter."


There was no order to the clips on the reel. The film hummed a bit as it wound itself around through the large console before us to produce the small image we strained to see. At one point a group of Mr. Badger's guests were up in the snow, at the edge of the Sierra where the pinion start to hug the rough landscape. Snowballs flew and it was clear these refugees from Hollywood were having a rare experience in the snow. Another sequence showed the cars (David Stenn thought they dated from 1924 or 1925) parked by the main lodge. Now surrounded by trees, the building rested out on those empty foothills, exposed to the harsh desert winds. A negative labeled "Woman In a Hat" showed a woman in what appeared a Mexican hat by Lone Pine Creek, the creek just below full flood stage.

Faces, we can only assume Badger family faces, would reappear. The woman in the hat had the look of either Mr. or Mrs. Badger's mother, but at this time we are unsure. There was a baby, and a young boy who seemed be older in some of the clips. Sadly, we have no program by which to tell the players. The clips are often short, occasionally damaged by decomposition. Clarence Badger seldom appears so we have to assume he was behind the camera. Obscure titles appear as if a professionally produced film, but their meaning is not obvious. One can imagine the people in the films sitting around, laughing at their meaning. Today we are merely puzzled. You had to be there to understand it and see the humor.

The films are wonderful, if tantalizingly short and rough. In terms of similar home movies, Guldin explained you had to go to the William Randolph Hearst home movies a couple of years later to see anything like them. Silent film stars were on vacation here in Lone Pine.

For Lone Pine these films provide a unique and rare view into one aspect of the history of the town. Clarence Badger building his ranch here, definitely made the town familiar to the "cream" of Hollywood society The movies have partially shaped the character of Lone Pine.

A few clips may lurk still in the massive amounts of film in the cache turned over to UCLA. The labels on the cans turned out often to be misleading. It is surmised that Badger left the film behind when he sold the property to Lesley and Irene Cuffe and immigrated to Australia. Apparently as the film decayed, often at different rates in different cans, Cuffe would dispose of the contents and use the can for his own project, which was Mysteries of the Universe. From his own family photo album we have pictures labeled 1926 where he is at the Wilson Observatory working on the documentary. It was made into many half hour parts to be shown at theatres. Though Cuffe was Badger's camera technician and projectionist, he also at times in his career ran movie theaters, one at Lake Arrowhead and, before his death, one in Lone Pine.


badgeraircraft.jpgIt was because of David Stenn's persistence that the clips were uncovered. The archivists at UCLA were excited about the can labeled Red Hair, but when it turned out to be Mysteries of the Universe, their attention went to other projects. Stenn admits that his search for the missing Clara Bow film Red Hair (1928) has been a personal search for his "Holy Grail." Finally the test color scenes for Red Hair were actually discovered on another reel. Then a whole reel of another lost Bow film Three Week Ends (1928) was also uncovered. It was, however, in very bad decay and after tedious and dedicated work, Guldun was able to salvage about a minute and one half.

Stenn arranged to have the Bow pictures preserved at his own expense. He used the royalties from his Bow biography Running Wild to pay for this work. A successful scriptwriter for hit shows like Beverly Hills 90210 and Hill Street Blues, he lives on his television work. He explained, "Without the Bow films, all his research and writing on film history is pointless."

The film clips are wonderful and it is obvious why Clara Bow became the first sexy mega star in the 1920's. The pieces that remain appear to be extended shots rather than edited scenes from the finished film. With the color section that began Red Hair, the clapboard shows and then the actress becomes the on screen persona Clara Bow, the "It" girl. Badger must order "Cut!" from off screen for Bow then relaxes back to a human being from her on screen siren role. Other scenes also preserved would have been tinted blue and yellow, but the Archive has not finished this process of restoration. Why Badger had unedited sections up at the ranch is a mystery unless he was working on editing the film there. We may never know. The clips were shown in Italy at a silent film festival and in L.A. at the Cinecon Festival in September to rave reviews from the film buff audience.

It is so very little. Perhaps much more had existed stored in that pump house in Lone Pine where the films were recovered. Stenn has adopted a healthy attitude. "You can't focus on what you have lost, but what you have found. And who knows where more of this film, one of the 'missing' films most sought after by film historians might still show up." Stenn told a story of his based on a report by a man who said he had been shown a copy by his college film professor. After ten years, Stenn finally found the professor in Louisiana. The man told him he had a list of all the films he had seen during his career and he had never shown Red Hair to a class or seen it himself. Apparently the story was fabricated for attention. Then Stenn told a similar story except this time the search ended in the recovery of another minor Bow film, The Primrose Path (1925), which Stenn was having preserved.

This story ends with a simple bottom line. The Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History has begun raising the funds to have the Badger Lone Pine home movies preserved. The process is measured by the foot and the price tag will be a hefty $5500. If we don't act quickly, a piece of Lone Pine's film history that we could have saved will be lost forever.

You will be hearing much more about our efforts to raise the money to save the film. If you are interested in saving Lone Pine's film history, won't you donate to the fund or call about how you can help in the fundraising process.

Chris Langley, Executive Director

December 31, 2003

The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Museum Riders will be representing the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History in this year's Rose parade. In the past, the riders have represented their namesakes museum in Victorville. When that museum closed and moved to Branson. Missouri, Cheryl Rogers Barnett, daughter of Roy and Dale, a long time attendee at the annual Lone Pine Film Festival and Board member of our museum, decided to continue riding and from now on to represent the Lone Pine Film History Museum.

Dorothy Bonnefin, Festival Director and Museum Board member, stated "We are excited about it. The telecast goes all over the world. The Riders are pegged to be entry 60, a little over the half way mark and scheduled to ride directly behind the mayor of Pasadena. Besides Cheryl and her husband Larry, Jim and Beverly Rogers of Sunbelt Communications have been pivotal in the project. There are sixteen riders scheduled to be in the equestrian ensemble. "It's hard to get in that parade," Bonnefin said. "It's very hard to even be included in it!"

December 14, 2003:

The Lone Pine Film Festival and the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History have agreed to work with Linda Lou Crosby to produce a one hour documentary on cowboy poet Owen Badgett. The Museum/Festival will be an umbrella nonprofit organization to help the production company procure grants and other financial aid for the project. The film will be titled "Owen Badgett: The Gypsy Cowman."

In part, the project description reads, "This is a proposal for a one-hour documentary telling the tale of a cowboy poet who lives and works on a ranch in Eastern Montana. Like his father before him, Owen calls himself a 'Gypsy Cowman.' A gypsy cowman is one who runs his herd of cattle on land he does not own."

The proposal continues, "To celebrate life as he knows it, Owen has written and self-published three books of his poetry and stories, which have been enjoyed by many across the country. Owen has appeared at a number of cowboy poetry gatherings, including the 'Granddaddy of them all' Elko, Nevada; Lewiston, Montana; Salinas; Ridgecrest; and Lone Pine, California (appearing during the Lone Pine Film Festival)."

While the Museum/Film Festival will not provide funding, Chris Langley, Inyo County Film Commission will provide services to the company when they film in and around Lone Pine and in the Alabama Hills. The Festival will also screen the final film at this or next year's fall classic

Additional information can be reached at Linda Lou Crosby at 760-377-5001, or Chris Langley at 760-937-1189 or by emailing through this website.

Getting the celebrity guests to where they belong on time at the Film festivalis the task of the “Star Wrangler.” It often requires the combined talents of a mother, a first grade teacher and a psychologist to keep all the talented yet disparate people on schedule It was one of those busy days at Lo-Inyo School in Lone Pine when everyone was trying to get every lesson covered in an effective way. Schools function on schedules, organization and efficiency. When I found out my classroom was going to be disrupted by a trip to the Lone Pine Airport, I was a little unsettled. So a world-class celebrity was going to stop by. What learning would come of that? I had to admit, however, I was curious.rand brooks.jpg

The day was busy and things were going ok but the Star Wrangler at the Lone Pine Film Festival was feeling tired, a little harried and frustrated. To someone sensitive or perceptive, the telltale droop of the shoulders and wrinkled brow were noticeable. The star came in, took one look and whisked the woman around the room in an elegant waltz, cheering her up and energizing her for the next couple of hours.

With a laugh, a twinkle of the eye and a kind voice, Rand Brooks, a playful gentleman, helped Sandy Langley get everyone where they needed to be..

Rand died on September first of cancer at the age of 84. He will be remembered fondly in Lone Pine where he worked many times in the movies.

Rand was born a Los Angelino and died at his ranch in Santa Inez, where he had retired with his wife Hermine to raise horses following an award winning second career with his company Professional Ambulance Service of Glendale, which he started in 1966.

In films, Rand’s most famous role was as Charles Hamilton, Scarlet O’Hara’s first husband in Gone with the Wind. Here in Lone Pine, we best remember him as Lucky, the eternally-smitten-with-love-at-first-sight sidekick to Hopalong Cassidy in the last 12 of the film series.

Rand broke into movies in an uncredited role in Love Finds Andy Hardy in 1938.

He made it to Lone Pine in the second of his Hoppy films, The Devil’s Playground (1946) as the famous Lucky Jenkins. The film is being shown Friday October 10th, 10:00 am at the High School Auditorium and you can see for yourself if it was the Lucky role that Rand was talking about when referring to the struggle to overcome his GWTW character.

“Charlie didn’t help my career. It hurt it. At the time it was such an asinine role. He was so in love it was sickening. I got typecast that way.”

Other Hoppy films made in Lone Pine with Rand include: Unexpected Guest (1947), Dangerous Venture (1947), Silent Conflict (1948), The Dead Don’t Dream (1948), Borrowed Trouble (1948), False Paradise (1948), and Strange Gamble (1948).

Rand was back in Lone Pine in 1949, starring with Roddy McDowell in the classic horse story Black Midnight. Again, in 1953, he played John Grant in Born to the Saddle with Chuck Courtney and then again in Comanche Station (1960) playing the Station Man with lead Randolph Scott.

Rand was present in Lone Pine for a first in television history, the first color episode of The Lone Ranger series. He played Al Sommers in an episode called “The Wooden Gun” about a boy and a wooden rifle and some real rifles.

Rand television credits are long and range from various western series like The Roy Rogers Show, Adventures of Wild Bill Hickock to Perry Mason and Adam 12. While he did seem to resent the romantic stero-type he was cast into, Rand did get to give Marilyn Monroe her first screen kiss in Ladies of the Chorus (1948).

Rand’s playful nature was always on view to anyone who knew him here in Lone Pine. Friendly, outgoing yet gentle, Rand was the perfect gentleman at the Hopalong celebration, both at the dinner at Ruiz Hill and later at the screening of the movie not far from Cooper Rock. However, he began to realize that he was getting a little too old still to be tromping around the Alabamas.

Rand began his ambulance service with two used ambulances and a credit card, but the company grew to the largest private ambulance 9-1-1 paramedic provider in Los Angeles County. During his ownership the ambulance service won several awards, commendations and was considered one of the best in the country. Rand and his wife Hermine, an executive with the company, sold the company in 1995. They had two children, a daughter and a son, Rand Brooks, Jr.

Lone Pine audiences will remember Rand as Lucky Jenkins, sweet and constantly lovelorn, but those of us who work behind the scenes at the Festival will remember him as a playful gentleman, always ready with positive or kind words of encouragement.

(Chris Langley can be reached at 760-937-1189 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

July 28, 2003:

Bob Hope came to Inyo County several years ago to film a Texaco commercial for one of his television specials. That’s not exactly news now except that Mr. Hope’s death inspires fond memories of a man who made our country laugh most of his life.
It was one of those busy days at Lo-Inyo School in Lone Pine when everyone was trying to get every lesson covered in an effective way. Schools function on schedules, organization and efficiency. When I found out my classroom was going to be disrupted by a trip to the Lone Pine Airport, I was a little unsettled. So a world-class celebrity was going to stop by. What learning would come of that? I had to admit, however, I was curious.      

Our principal, Duncan Hobbs, managed to get every student from every class out to Lone Pine Airport in an orderly manner. We waited and a plane flew in and out stepped that familiar face. I don’t remember now how it all went, what he said, but I remember quite a crowd of kids and a man who had taken time out of a busy day to stop by. It was fun and interesting and after the little ceremony with the kids saying hello and greeting him, we returned to the classroom.

My wife was teaching first grade at the time and to use the experience for as much educational value as possible, she had each child draw a picture and then do a language experience with their thoughts recorded at the bottom of the picture. After school she bound the booklet of drawings to make a nice souvenir. We decided that I would give it to one of his assistants when Mr. Hope returned to the airport after filming the commercial in Death Valley.

It was winter, one of those crystal clear days, with warm sunshine, that deteriorates into a sharp cold night as soon as the sun drops below the mountains in the afternoon. Mr. Hope’s plane was late, as filming had dragged on.

Finally, a radio message said he was coming in. The airport terminal was surprisingly empty now and when he landed, an assistant took me to him. He was friendly, excited to see someone, or at least so it seemed. I told him that my wife’s class had prepared a present for him, a booklet of their thoughts about meeting him earlier in the day.

"That's great! I would love to sit down and look at it, but first I have to call my wife Delores and tell her it looks like I am going to be a little late for dinner, but I am coming." Instead of having an assistant or secretary make the call, he went over to the phone himself and called his wife.


Coming back in full make-up still, wrapped in a heavy coat, he looked fatigued but brightened up as soon as he took the booklet in his hands.

bob hopeandcar.jpgHe sat down with me and looked at each picture, read each language experience, laughed, smiled and commented. He clearly loved kids and understood their unique points of view.

He took the booklet with him as he went to board his plane for his return home and dinner. He thanked me enthusiastically as if I had given him some kind of humanitarian award for a lifetime of work.

A few weeks later a packet of over three hundred signed pictures arrived at the school for the students. That may not seem so amazing, except that each picture was individually addressed to a student using his or her name. Someone had asked for a complete list of names from the school and Mr. Hope had made sure each student had a personal small token of his appreciation for their welcome at the airport that day.

group-1 copy.jpgJune 4, 2003:

Mark Griggs wrote recently from Australia wondering if the Clarence Badger we have on our website from Lone Pine is the same movie director he lived with in Sydney, Australia when he was a boy. He was ten and describes Badger as a kindly, grandfather type in his last years. Badger man and dog-1 copy.jpghad moved to Australia permanently for reasons that still remain a mystery. There he directed two films and worked on two others. Mark has supplied us with archival picture images that his family had kept showing Mr. Badger professionally engaged in directing and meeting people in Australia. Some of the photos are from the Lone Pine Ranch that we had never seen before.

two people-1 copy.jpgLast week, Mark discovered a 16mm film in his shed that belonged to Mr. Badger, Enlargements of the frames identify it as all being up at the ranch or around the hills in Lone Pine. He estimates it to be about 6 minutes in length. Several people appear in it that we have not been able to identify. They could be visiting celebrities, Badger family or friends, or local Lone Pine people. If anyone can help us identify the people, we would be very grateful.

two men-1 copy.jpgEventually we hope to show the film at one of the festivals. There has been no word on the home movies that appear to be part of the cache of films now at the UCLA Archive. Because combining them all, we can get a good picture of what life was like at the Badger ranch during its early years.

SOME HIGHLIGHTS ON THE TRAIL TO THE 2010 LONE PINE FILM FESTIVAL

By Chris Langley, Executive Director, Lone Pine Film History Museum

The Lone Pine Film Festival is upon us again, when we celebrate the rich film history of our areas: Lone Pine, Death Valley and the Eastern Sierra areas. This will be the twenty-first time we have rolled out the welcome mat to celebrities, fans and the curious who just happen by. Some highlights include a rare silent film primarily shot on Lubken Canyon Road, several new location tours and one-on-one interviews/ panels where some new faces will talk about their careers, experiences before and behind the camera and answer your questions. More ->


hopalong-hop-on-thumb.jpgFOR FILM BUFFS ,THE “TRAIL LEADS TO LONE PINE, CALIFORNIA FOR THE 21ST ANNUAL FILM FESTIVAL ON OCTOBER 8-10TH

By Chris Langley, Executive Director, Lone Pine Film History Museum

Film fans will be following the “Trail to Lone Pine” this year on the Columbus Day weekend, October 8-10th. Those are the dates for the twenty-first annual Lone Pine Film Festival. The now world famous film festival focuses on the films made in Lone Pine, Death Valley and the eastern Sierra and has been a favorite for film buffs in the know for more than two decades. More ->


annieoakley_gaildavis_thumb.jpgFILM MUSEUM EXHIBIT ON REEL/REAL WOMEN OF EASTERN CALIFORNIA OPENS WITH AUTHOR EVENT SATURDAY

By Chris Langley, Executive Director, Lone Pine Film History Museum

This coming Saturday evening Author Chris Enss will present a program on the images of women of the West in film and in real life, kicking-off the Lone Pine Film History Museum’s part of the “Celebrating Women of Eastern California” exhibit organized through the Eastern Sierra Cultural and Heritage Alliance (ESCHA). More ->


rex_allen_exhib_thumb.jpgVISITING FILM MUSEUM EXHIBIT TELLS LIFE OF THREE MOVIE COWBOY STARS FROM ONE FAMILY

By Chris Langley, Executive Director, Lone Pine Film History Museum

A visiting exhibit at the Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film History examines the film careers of three cousins: Cactus Mack, Glenn Strange, and Rex Allen. While Rex Allen has the more familiar and recognizable name of the three, Mack and Strange may actually have been seen more frequently by many western fans. Consequently, their faces may be more recognizable, while their names remain unknown. They often played henchmen, bad guys and villains, but frequently in the background or as a member of a gang More ->

 

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